Arlene’s statement on Irish may be crucial to the defusing of the nasty culture bomb that is blocking NI democracy 

One of the most depressing milestones in the pre Christmas crisis was Paul Given’s pointless and counterproductive cutting of the tiny Liofa bursary fund for funding poorer kids to attend Gaeltacht courses in the summer colleges in Donegal (predominantly attended by kids from NI).

Even for those of us determined to resist the casual vilification of unionist politics that’s so commonplace amongst the NI commentatiat that was a hard one to take. 

The health of the language in NI has not been dependent on government support, in fact it has flourished in many places in spite of the general inertia, not least in SF run departments whose ministers have lacked dynamism on the most basic of issues, like busses for Meanscoil students.

Most of the progress has been down to the work of genuine social entrepreneurs, like those families who set up the first genuine city based Gaeltacht community on Shaw’s Road on the edge of Andersonstown in the west, and more recently the pioneering work of Linda Ervine in the east.

So, nearly ten years after the first British Ambassador to Ireland attended his first Gaeltacht course in Donegal it was good to hear what sounds like a change of heart from the DUP leader Arlene Foster:

We do want to respect and indeed better understand the language and culture which we are not a part of and to that end over the next short period of time I do intend to listen and to engage with those from the Gaelic/Irish background, those without party political baggage or indeed demands, people who genuinely love the Irish language and don’t want to use it as a political weapon.

For those of us whose roots remain close to the Gaeltacht life source of the language it is as much a tie to speakers of the language in the Scottish islands (which remarkably similar to Donegal Irish – and English) as to our own sense of belonging to Ulster and Ireland. 

Maybe it’s a prelude to something deeper in the negotiation process, maybe not. Such broadening of human feeling, however, is crucial to the defusing of a nasty little culture bomb that’s still periodically capable of causing huge damage to our fledgling democracy.

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  • MainlandUlsterman

    There are so many. The “public square” encompasses public discourses as well as the use of visual imagery etc. We live in a world in which “Ireland” and “Irish” are dominant in discourse, outside unionist circles, over “Northern Ireland” and “British” in relation to Northern Ireland. I could write a treatise, but won’t, on the negative portrayal of pan-UK symbols and identities as somehow controversial or disputed in a Northern Ireland context. But to your point …

    So a few examples of nationalist symbolism in the public square – bearing in mind I’m not arguing they shouldn’t be there, just that they are there.
    1. Starting point has to be political framework within which we all operate, the Good Friday (happy anniversary) inter-locking institutions and the agreement itself. This included all sorts of nationalist language about “the people of Ireland” etc and set out a case in Irish nationalist terms for why Northern Ireland has to continue until further notice. The document met widespread acceptance within Irish nationalism North and South.
    2. Then if you look at film output on Northern Ireland, the narratives are overwhelmingly nationalist-leaning (in the early 90s an ex-pat academic of cinema, Prof Brian McIlroy wrote a pretty devastating and comprehensive survey of the output to that point, “Shooting to Kill” – and it certainly hasn’t improved since then).
    3. In literature, Stephen Howe has written brilliantly in “Ireland and Empire” about the heavily nationalist cultural assumptions and assertions contained in a lot of the writings of literature academics about N Ireland (Field Day etc but not just that). More broadly, there seems to me (having met some of them at dinner parties – my wife is a historian) to be a broad pro-nationalist set of assumptions among a lot of the academic elite. That area of the public square has a nationalist flag planted somewhere near the middle of it.
    4. Some other random examples: as a parent these last 13 years I’ve been a regular visitor to the W5 (actually not for the last couple of years). The geography learning bits are split into areas that look at N Ireland specifically and all-Ireland bits. Or we can get into all the false “balance” now seen across media, where pro-violence Republican explanations of the Troubles are treated as equally worthy of respect as those against violence, with unionists being portrayed as stupid, stubborn and mean – with the routine use of an Orangemen or a random street interview to give the unionist voice, juxtaposed with someone urbane and educated to give the nationalist perspective.

    We are not in a place where unionists feel the public square is even a balanced place, let alone one in which nationalists are absent as you suggest.

    We tend not to notice what’s familiar or normal to us and pick up on what jars. And I do accept nationalists in NI have to live with fairly ubiquitous UK symbols such as the union flag, the lion and unicorn, red post boxes, Queen on stamps etc. Yet those are all the result of N Ireland’s democratically legitimate – as agreed by SF in 1998 and by everyone else some generations earlier – choice to be in the UK. We are where we are with which state we’re in, whatever your preference – and states cannot *not* have symbols attached. Those unhappy with them nevertheless have to accept the overall democratic choice.

    What we can do, and which I think has happened to some degree, is for the state to be restrained in its outward expression of its Britishness and not ladle it on. Where there is ladling on, it’s invariably at a popular level by people in N Ireland, like at the 12th, jubilee celebrations and so on – and they are perfectly entitled to do that, as are nationalists.

    As we all know, the trick is for those expressing themselves to do so with awareness of the reasonable feelings of others and for those others not to go out of our way to take offence where none is intended. So the good citizen might for example let a peaceful Orange parade go past quietly rather than getting up at 5.30am to be offended by it; and might let a GAA game proceed in a ground named after a sectarian murderer, rather than seeking to disrupt it.

    I’m actually on a call later this morning with a semiotician who’s writing about national identities in the UK – yes semioticians are actual people – so I may have some more interesting things to add after that.

  • Madra Uisce

    Nonsense. Parity of esteem means equality and respect for the symbols and culture of the Nationalist community and we are no where near that in the context of the North.

  • johnny lately

    Its simple Granni. Your obsession with finding a chink in Sinn Feins armour leaves you blind to what they actually say. They have been clear as day from the first moment they walked out of Stormont that it wasn’t only about the RHI scandal, that it was about unresolved issues promised and agreed in both the GFA and St Andrews ie like an ILA, Bill of Rights etc. The RHI scandal was the straw that broke the camels back but it wasn’t the only reason and I think you know like everyone else that the RHI scandal will be resolved by that promised inquiry but those other unresolved matters are now the focus of those talks that are going on at present.

  • johnny lately

    If you could point us to a link where Orange order parades took place at 5.30 in the morning that might help your one sided narrative but I doubt if you could. On the point of residents opposing Orange order parades, do those residents who oppose parades that are accompanied by lodges carrying banners glorifying the sectarian murderer who murdered innocent residents from the area they are parading by not entitled to the same rights not to be offended as those residents of Wootton Bassett ?

  • Old Mortality

    You don’t see Gaelic road signs in Scotland outside the highlands & islands. You do see Welsh signs everywhere in Wales but Welsh speaking is far more diffused there.

  • Old Mortality

    It’s strange but I’ve just been delving into early medieval European history and have yet to find any mention of Irish monks, let alone Ulster ones.

  • Am Ghobsmacht

    I certainly will Nevin! You’ve intrigued me!

  • Old Mortality

    That is complete nonsense. Almost every Catholic secondary school has taught Irish for decades, albeit often as a ‘foreign’ language, at the expense of Spanish or German.

  • Fear Éireannach

    Ah the old trick of contending that whatever has been established after 400 years of British rule and anti Irish discrimination is “neutral”. What we have we hold, eh?

    Division and rancour in this case would come form those who wish to signal that they do not want Irish about the place. It is not acceptable that NI continues to be run on this basis, but it seems that many people still want it to be be, and this is depressing. Such people are now in a minority though and they will not get their way for much longer.

  • Old Mortality

    So we can assume that, left to its own devices, the Irish would always have been a pre-eminent European nation which others vainly sought to emulate. Hmmm.

  • Korhomme

    “All the world is queer save thee and me, and even thou art a little queer.”;)

  • Nevin

    Always appeal to folk’s natural curiosity! And compare the handwriting!

    As usual, there are variant spellings for this townland – and its hidden clachan.

  • Trasna

    Is that you Arlene?

  • 05OCT68

    I’d have some respect for Gavin if he did object to all indigenous languages in the UK being funded, protected or promoted. His objections to Irish are in fact un-British.

  • 05OCT68

    Playing devils advocate, If I accept that the Northern six counties of Ireland are part of the UK, then in fact Irish is an indigenous language of the UK

  • 05OCT68

    Was taught Irish in a CBS the 70’s

  • 05OCT68

    More likely the Irish left alone would have formed good relations with it’s larger neighbor to the east. Remember it was the English that for centuries was the poor relation in Europe & who emulated France & Spain to become an empire. England wasn’t always a pre-eminent European nation.

  • 05OCT68

    So certain parts of the community are happy, I dare say proud to live in an Irish place name say the Shankill for example, but would object to dual signage? Could it not spark an interest in the origin of place names? Maybe that’s the fear, innate human curiosity

  • Am Ghobsmacht

    On that note, there’s an entire clachan near killough, co down. It’s just a few stump walls now but clearly visible.
    I’ll have a hoke online for it.

  • Nevin

    “Continue through longer grass to Sheepland, an abandoned settlement that was once home to a corn mill. The path now returns to sea level and continues to the wooden cross and enclosure surrounding St Patrick’s Well, a site associated with the saint’s arrival in County Down in 432 AD.” It’s near Killough in the Lecale district.

  • Trasna

    Irish doesn’t exist in NI, as the last native speaker died decades ago and with him, NI’s only native language.

    The Irish that’s been promoted today is a foreign language but native to the ROI.

  • Trasna

    Un-British, Jesus Christ almighty. It’s as fucking British as it gets.

    Jesus wept.

  • Trasna

    Really? Yet few in NI speak Irish. Amazing.

  • Ciaran O’Neill

    I think thats part of the real danger and fear that people, especially a few on here, have – once you learn the language then you move on to learning the history. A slippery slope some see it as

  • Ciaran O’Neill

    I was told by unionist on here last week that I should appreciate and be thankful of the people who murdered my cousin. This isnt an exaggeration at all. They were deadly serious

  • Peggy kelly

    Then condemn the covenant, accept and condemn the discrimination, condemn the udr and ruc violence against catholics, etc. etc.

  • Peggy kelly

    Nothing in the GFA stops the flying of both flags side by side as a show of unity and mutual respect.

  • Am Ghobsmacht

    Thanks to Nevin for reminding me of this tool: http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/search/#searchmore

    For anyone in any kind of denial or doubt about Protestants speaking Irish in 1911 simply select the desired religion from the drop down menu and ‘Irish’ from the language menu and then ‘search’.

    Watch as hundreds (if not thousands) of them appear on your screen.

  • Devil Éire

    The fact that you had to use so broad a definition of ‘public square’ just to encompass a smattering of ersatz ‘examples’ (spread across a bloated verbosity) rather demonstrates my point.

    I was particularly amused to see that references to the island of Ireland in a discussion of geography in a classroom setting were counted in the ‘plus’ column for nationalists.

    By the way, you should note that simply referencing the fact that people have written about things is a classic logical fallacy – the ‘appeal to authority’. It is not an argument in itself and has no persuasive power.

    I’m actually on a call later this morning with a semiotician who’s writing about national identities in the UK – yes semioticians are actual people – so I may have some more interesting things to add after that.

    Yes, it is painfully obvious from your recent output that you have just discovered semiotics. On the substantive question, however, of Irish-language signs in Northern Ireland:

    I do accept nationalists in NI have to live with fairly ubiquitous UK symbols such as the union flag, the lion and unicorn, red post boxes, Queen on stamps etc. Yet those are all the result of N Ireland’s democratically legitimate – as agreed by SF in 1998 and by everyone else some generations earlier – choice to be in the UK.

    So your point is that yes, Northern Ireland is awash with British symbols but since nationalists signed up to the Good Friday Agreement they just have to lump it.

    That is very clear. However, as those from an Irish cultural background increase in numbers and political strength in Northern Ireland, it is likely that they will seek greater representation of ‘Irishness’ in civic life.

    The fact that this will be fought, tooth and nail, by unionists like yourself, further increasing the alienation of a group that will be critically important to the survival of the union, only helps the greater nationalist project.

  • Ciaran74

    Join a library.

  • Ciaran74

    ‘They ignore, and do not particularly wish to know of the grievous sufferings which have been inflicted on the Irish people in the course of the British conquest and occupation of Ireland. Whenever this is mentioned, they just complain that our memories are too long as that we should forget the past….’

    Seán MacBride.

  • file

    And who elected Conradh na Gaeilge to speak for me?

  • MainlandUlsterman

    I commissioned my first piece of semiotics in 2008. So, late to the party yes but not that late.

    But do people really feel Irish culture, in terms of music, dance and language programmes on the Beeb for example, is under-represented generally in the NI mainstream? A legitimate gripe 30 years ago, sure – but not really now surely. But look I’m all for helping Irish survive and thrive and giving some funding to that and even having legislation on it, though whether it needs its own act purely for it and no other cultural promotion measures, I’m not so sure.

  • file

    Ach she wasn’t really that much of a native speaker at the end – just remembered a few aul prayers and the usual lá deas ann and cé mar tá tú. She left Rathlin when she was about 12 or 14.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    The reference to the odd book here and there by the way is not supposed to prove any point but just bring in a wider frame of reference and give a few pointers to anyone interested in reading something more detailed and better expressed than my efforts.

  • file

    Because, my dear, as you well know, some of the Irish speakers in Norn Iron do it precisely to be anti-British, i.e. that is the motivation for learning and speaking Irish for them. And that is part of the problem.

  • file

    Yeah it leaves us where we are factually: outside of Britain, which is the island immediately to our east.

  • file

    It is not a foreign language – it is a heritage language in NI, if you like, but it is still native to NI even in the absence of living native speakers. But what do you call children who are brought up speaking Irish as their first language by parents who learnt the language? When such children subsequently learn English, they learn it as a second language, and it is not their native language.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    What I’d like to see is a new Northern Ireland flag we can all fly and get behind.

  • file

    Define few, Trasna. You might find that ‘few’ in relation to overall population is more appropriate for ROI than for NI in terms of Irish speakers.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    You might need to be more specific about the bits that were wrong. The thrust behind the covenant was right though I wouldn’t agree with using force except in legal self-defence. Discrimination by both sides obviously wrong. UDR much maligned and did lots of great work, RUC even more so, but obviously I have no problem condemning – and have genuine anger towards – those in uniform who let the country down by resorting to criminality or illegal violence in contravention of duty. Mercifully few, I should add.

  • file

    Is the Orange Order an organisation of a Protestant Church?

  • file

    This thing about people being offended has to be knocked on the head. People do not have a ‘right’ to be offended; they can be offended if they choose to be, but that does not carry with it a responsibility for other people to stop offending them or to do away with the source of the offence. I am offended, for example, by the poor quality of journalistic rigour when questioning our politicians – but I do not expect the BBC to have to react to my offence by sending them on a training course or something. A guy in a bar once approached me to tell me that his girlfriend found my T-shirt offensive. I advised him to tell her to stop looking at it then.

  • file

    Well, I find the missing fada offensive, but please do not feel under any obligation to do anything about it,

  • file

    Individual communities do not own their road signs: the executive does. Individual communities have no say on the English words that the executive puts on their roads = sure they even put Toomebridge on some of them, when the place has been called Toome since before bridges were invented.

  • Thomas Girvan

    Here’s a surprise. it is a Protestant organisation.

  • Peggy kelly

    The Ulster flag covers it.

  • Thomas Girvan

    The same way as having a statue of Daniel O’Connell in Dublin.

  • file

    But I want an answer to the question: is it actually a Protestant Church organisation, in the way say that a Confraternity is an organisation of the Catholic Church.

  • Fear Éireannach

    with unionists being portrayed as stupid, stubborn and mean
    is this inaccurate, when they appoint Arlene Foster to represent them? Is this inaccurate when they voted for Brexit, which would wreck the NI economy, in the hope of annoying nationalists? Is that not the gist of Alex Kane’s article posted here, and he a unionist?

  • file

    She was my Granny, Keep it real.

  • Trasna

    Who knew that O’Conell presided over genocide, ethnic cleansing and mass forced evictions and emigration. The loss of six million people and Protestant people supported the genocide and the German. Sure why wouldn’t they eh, she did what Protestants always wanted to do?

  • Trasna

    It is the way it is because you say so.

  • grumpy oul man

    Sometimes reading Mick threads it seems that unionists never run a nasty secterian state or worked with terrorists or ignored the Irish culture,
    You would think that the crocodile lady was just having a bad day and was outside the norm of unionist polticians views on Irish.

  • grumpy oul man

    Excellent, so there is no problem among unionisms about the Irish language .
    Oh unionisms did not adopt Irish symbols they were Irish in the times you talk about.
    Modern unionisms don’t think they are Irish and that is part of the problem.

  • Concubhar O Liathain

    That would be Foras na Gaeilge, after a publicly advertised competition.

  • file

    I don’t recall electing Foras na Gaeilge either, but yeah, I suppose so, Conradh na Gaeilge is appointed by Foras na Gaeilge for Ardú Feasachta, Cosaint Teanga agus Ionadaíocht (thar ceann na teanga le húdaráis stáit) … so they were acting within their remit, although I would argue that anirihs Language Act may not actually protect the language but do damage to it – no argument with the other 2 parts of their brief: raising awareness (certainly have done that) and representation to state (both states) authorities.

  • file

    Indeed. Courses in truth recognition and history are much needed here in the Annex.

  • file

    Thank you for recognising my omniscience. Very perspicacious of you, Trasna.

  • file

    *doh* really, keep it real? Was it? Sorry for sarcasm … I understood your comment; I was just providing evidence that I know whereof I speak as she spent the last 20 odd years of her life with us.

  • Trasna

    Are you a former Mayor of Belfast by chance?

  • file

    Not yet.

  • Tochais Siorai

    Nope. It’s due to a local provincial thing – I think the white jersey was Prussian and the green Saxony or something like that. The usual urban myth is that the green jersey was due to the FAI being the first to send a team to play West Germany after WW2. (And they weren’t anyway).

  • Thomas Girvan

    I don’t know anything about Confraternaties but the O.O. isn’t affiliated to a specific denomonation as far as I know.
    If you are are a Roman Catholic, Mormon, or Unitarian, and some branches of Quaker I don’t think you would be eligible for membership.
    If you fit one of these categories and wanted to join a fraternal organisation I would suggest the R.A.O.B.
    (aka the Buffs,) might be your best bet.
    They are a very creditable organisation and do a lot for worthwhile causes, and have a very active social side to them, unfortunately, if you are so inclined, they don’t do marching, as far as I know.

  • file

    Hi An Ghobsmacht. Interesting asides on the hurling thing. There is a theory of the ‘two games’ sort in the history of hurlng [Scéal na hIomána, a rare book whihc I bought recently but failed to read yet] and apart form the geographic factor you mention, there was also a seasonal one, ie there was winter hurling and summer hurling. Those bastards down south with the better weather, the harder ground and the sunshine on their backs (the Sunny Southeast), were always more adept at the Summer hurling – and still are. The odd time Antrim makes some inroads during the league, in the sliotar-extracting, muddy field type of game. Come the Summer, with the sun blazing and the sliotar flying off the turf, it is like our top gear is second or third, while Tipp, Kilkenny, Galway (sometimes), Waterford etc have 5 and sometimes 6 gears available to them. But anyway, do you want to go to a hurling match with me?

  • file

    Why are y’all so into flags? The only flag I have is a Brazil one, which I take out every four years and hang out an upstairs window to confuse the postman.

  • file

    The Ulster flag covers two thirds of it.

  • file

    a mhuc.
    (complicated linguistic joke there for the cogiscenti)

  • file

    Thomas, I was querying Mainland Ulsterman’s comment above about the Orange Order and his retort that Protestants cannot join Catholic Organisations.He fails to realise that what he sees as Catholic cultural organisations/movements, are not actually part of the Catholic Church and do not require any religious affiliation for membership. So, Irish language movement and GAA are completely open for Protestants to join; Orange Order and Catholic Church confraternities are NOT open to people of other religious affiliations.

  • Am Ghobsmacht

    Yes, if I recall correctly the now default hurly stick is the ‘summer’ version and the ‘winter’ version was more akin to the shinty stick, I’ll look out for that book as it should compliment what little I know most of which was gleaned from ‘Camanachd!’ by Roger Hutchison (great read).

    I should certainly like to go to a hurling game with you. I will not be back in NI for a few months though (August methinks) but if you keep it in mind then I’m up for it.

    If it’s an ambush by an array of all the people that I’ve bothered on slugger over the years then it’ll be a fitting end:

    “THIS is a hurly stick!!!” *WHACK!*

    “THIS is a shinty stick!!!” *WHACK!*

    “and this is a Slieve Luchra style jig performed with hob-nailed boots. ON YOUR HEAD!!!!”

    Can we make it a Slugger day out?

  • MainlandUlsterman

    That’s another good approach!

  • Madra Uisce

    What was it you were saying about parity of esteem yesterday?

  • MainlandUlsterman

    The parity of esteem principle is consistent with the rest of the Good Friday Agreement, not in opposition to it. And in that, we all agreed that NI is part of the UK state until NI people want otherwise. And we all agreed that parity of esteem is to be respected for both national identities within that framework.

  • Madra Uisce

    I the case of the UDR it was more than a few. One in six according to the British government. https://sluggerotoole.com/2006/05/03/details_on_that_udr_and_collusion_story/

  • Madra Uisce

    So the natural outworkings of parity of esteem would see both communities symbols displayed.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    It says these people had “links” to Loyalists but that’s a very broad term. Fair to say some of the vetting was pretty loose early on and I note the report is from the early years of the UDR. Things tightened up considerably as a result – the UDR did not approve of soldiers operating that way. It would be interesting to know what actual crimes were committed by UDR soldiers that were not acted upon. We know there were some rogue operators but there is no evidence of them being allowed to operate that way, they had to operate covertly in contravention of their duties to do so. So writing off the entire UDR – especially when that regiment lost more than 250 people to terrorist attacks – is not warranted and is more than a little insensitive to the families of the murdered, nearly all of whom were utterly blameless public servants doing their bit to protect the public from terrorism. They had to face the daily threat of death for their trouble and it was thankless work. And now all they get is a heap of abuse, led by some of the very people who were murdering them. It really stinks.

  • Nevin

    AG, the ‘Irish’ response was for those who spoke Irish but couldn’t speak English. Here are the figures for Irish monoglot speakers in County Antrim, by main denomination:

    1901

    Presbyterian: 3312 out of 166,607 > 1.99%
    Roman Catholic: 699 out of 110,462 > 0.63%
    Church of Ireland: 3726 out of 106,147 > 3.51%

    1911

    Presbyterian: 2786 out of 179,689 > 1.55%
    Roman Catholic: 408 out of 116,331 > 0.35%
    Church of Ireland: 3123 out of 117972 > 2.65%

    I wonder how many folk didn’t understand the question.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    That doesn’t allow for that part of the public use of symbols which is to do with the state you’re in – official flags, crests etc. As we’re in the U.K. there are going to be UK symbols used in public buildings that flow from the UK institutions involved, e.g. courts, NHS etc. We have chosen to be in the U.K. and it does have consequences. In any future United Ireland presumably there would be different state symbols and people would be expected to accept that as part of being in that country. I’m not sure how reasonable it is to expect symbols to be dealt with as if there is joint sovereignty, when there isn’t. Parity of esteem means that we accept each other as British, Irish or neither, treat those things as of equal value and don’t presume to tell other people our identity is better or more valid or more real than theirs. It means we should be tolerant of other people’s expression of their identity. But it is different with institutions. Some can and should adopt neutral symbolism, but you can’t expect parity of symbolism across the board. The NHS shouldn’t have to change its logo for NI, the national flag is still the union flag and so on. What I would like to see is a new shared Northern Ireland flag as that could incorporate more nationalist-friendly symbolism. And we should have our own anthem for NI matches, not GSTQ.

  • Am Ghobsmacht

    Given that i didn’t I’d hope ‘quite a lot…’

  • Nevin

    For the good folk down at the East Belfast Mission it was probably a case of Mission Impossible!

  • Dónall

    That is quite a subjective outlook file.

  • file

    Aren’t all personal outlooks subjective, and most general ones too?

  • Dónall

    Tá sin fíor, sin ráite, seans ann nach ndéanfadh Acht Ghaeilge difear i do shaol féin go pearsanta ach thiocfadh liom smaointiú ar chuid mhór a mbainfidh an-leas as a leithéid d’Acht. Daoine atá ag tógáil páistí le Gaeilge, múinteoirí, páistí atá ag freastal ar Ghaelscoileanna srl. Tá sé seo fíor ó thaobh clubanna óige, achmhainní scoile, fás agus forbairt na Gaelscolaíochta agus oideachas tríú leibhéil tríd an Ghaeilge amach anseo. (PS. If you need a translation let me know)

  • file

    Níl Acht de dhíth fá choinne ceann ar bith de na grúpaí ná de na gníomhartha atá luaite agat thuas. Ní chluinim fá Acht ach cead a bheith ag MLAs Gaeilge a labahirt sa Tionól agus cead dul i dteagmháil le haegaraíochtaí stáit i nGaeilge agus cead Gaeilge a labhairt sa chúirt. Agus ní ar leas na Gaeilge na bearta sin; níl iontu ach maisíocht.

  • Dónall

    Beidh le feiceáil cad é a bheidh san Acht ach is cinnte nach ndéanfaidh sé dochar an Ghaeilge a bheith giota beag níos feiceálaí. Tá a fhios agam go maith go mbíonn ana-chuid deacrachtaí ag múinteoirí Gaelscoileanna teacht ar achmhainní cuí. Agus cúpla seachtain ó shin bhí ar dhaoine tabhairt faoi na sráideanna de bhrí gur gearradh an t-airgead ó na clubanna óige Gaeilge i mBéal Feirste. Ní aithnítear seoltaí Gaeilge, is minic litreacha a bhfuil ainm Gaeilge orthu bheith stróichthe agus i gcás amháin seoladh litir anonn chun na Síne http://www.thejournal.ie/so-a-statement-for-irish-language-mag-ended-up-in-macau-china-936268-Jun2013/ Fiú in áiteanna a bhfuil móramh ar son na comharthaíochta i nGaeilge tá na Breithimh ag iarraidh go mbeadh daoine nár bhac le vóta a chaitheamh tugtha san áireamh Táthar ag súil go mbeadh fadhbanna mar seo réitithe nuair a thiocfaidh Acht Gaeilge i bhfeidhm.