Sean Quinn: “I am not dishonest.”

Dublin High Court, however, disagrees, finding the bankrupt Sean Quinn snr, his son Sean Quinn, and his nephew Peter Darragh Quinn in contempt of court for putting assets beyond the reach of the former Anglo-Irish Bank, now the state-owned Irish Bank Resolution Corporation (IBRC).  From the BBC report

In her ruling, Judge Elizabeth Dunne described Peter Darragh Quinn’s evidence as “evasive, uncooperative and, at times, untruthful.”

She said he gave the impression that he would do anything to put assets beyond reach.

The judge said Sean Quinn Junior did not give the truth in evidence and overall was not credible.

Sean Quinn Senior’s evidence was also evasive and not credible, she said.

It was “impossible to accept the evidence of Sean Quinn Senior that he had no hand, act or part in Quinn business after April 2011”, she said.

The Irish Times report, which also has the ruling embedded, notes

The [judge] found the three men continued efforts to put assets beyond the reach of the Irish Bank Resolution Corporation, which now incorporates Anglo Irish Bank, after orders were made by Mr Justice Frank Clark in the High Court last year that they desist from doing so.

The behaviour of the three outlined in the evidence put before her by the bank was “as far removed form the concept of honour and respectability as it is possible to be”, Ms Justice Dunne said.

The judge will decide on Friday the sanctions to be imposed on the three who were in court for today’s ruling in which she described the evidence of all three as unbelievable and evasive in many respects.

Given her findings, and while she thought the coercive aspect of the sanction should be to the fore, it would be “very difficult” to persuade her there should not be a punitive element to the sanction, the judge said.

The bank’s action against the three men included the suggestion that they be committed to prison.

The bank is to indicate to the Quinn side by 8pm tomorrow what sanctions it is seeking and the judge will hear from both sides on that issue on Friday before making her decision.

The BBC NI business editor, Jim Fitzpatrick, who presented a detailed Spolight report on the story in May, has more here.

And Namawinelake has a detailed post on the Spotlight investigation.

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  • Mister_Joe

    Pete, I tried to access the Spotlight story but, as usual, could not access it outside the UK. However, your last link included details on how to circumvent this. Thank you.

  • quality

    Maybe he meant “I am not not dishonest”?

  • Rory Carr

    While Judge Dunne has stated that it would be “very difficult” to persuade her that there should not be a punitive element to any sanction she might impose, that is that she not be persuaded to send these three evasive fellows to chokey, I just bet that somehow she will overcome that difficulty and that our three boyos, whatever sanctionsthey may be obliged to endure, whatever punishments are meted out to them, will walk free from the court, all fear of imprisonment dispelled.

    This of course is as it should be, for our heroes are very wealthy men and, as we all know, prisons were not intended for very wealthy men.

  • SDLP supporter

    Rory Carr, time will tell if you are right and there’s not long to wait till Friday. My feeling is that the man/woman in the street, “an fear ar an cnoc” in the south is seething and that he/she wants a victim. I honestly think a lot of people would love to string up the likes of Seanie Fitzpatrick, Charlie McCreevey and the former heads of AIB/BoI.

    One way or another, there’ll be no more pro-Quinn demos in Fermanagh.

  • Barnshee

    An inevitable deal along the lines of bring (some of) the money back and no jail time.

    No balls for the alternative?

    Stiff sentences all round and seizure of assets under Proceeds of Crime legislation

    As R says
    “This of course is as it should be, for our heroes are very wealthy men and, as we all know, prisons were not intended for very wealthy men.”

  • slanghammer

    I think Sean Quinn is hitting the banks with an equal measure of the contempt with which they treat humanity and the commercial courts do not like it.
    It’s fine when the banks misplace billions and just can’t seem to remember what pocket they put it into, has any judge called the CEO’s of the international banks “dishonest” or similar ?
    Everything seems to be on the side of the banksters.
    Anyone think the system including the legal system a little one sided or am I the odd one out?

  • Alias

    “I think Sean Quinn is hitting the banks with an equal measure of the contempt with which they treat humanity and the commercial courts do not like it.”

    It is the taxpayers who must repay 100% of the Mr Quinn’s debts that Mr Quinn has guaranteed but it unwilling to repay.

    Call me old-fashioned, but I’d rather see taxpayers’ money used to finance hospitals or schools for example that used to keep the Quinn family in a style that they do not deserve.