McCausland says a Culture Act is worth considering

Former DUP MLA and Culture Minister, Nelson McCausland has made some interesting comments to the News Letter in response to Arlene Foster’s engagement with the Irish Language Community.

Former Culture Minister Nelson McCausland yesterday told the News Letter that an inclusive cultural Act “could well be the way forward”. He added: “It would recognise that there is more than one indigenous minority language in Northern Ireland and more than one cultural tradition.”

Mr McCausland believes a culture Act could help to rectify what he described as “the cultural wrongs imposed on Northern Ireland”.

He added: “The Belfast Agreement embedded preferential treatment for the Irish language to the neglect of other cultural traditions and enshrined that inequality in law. “Ulster-Scots language and culture, Orange culture and Ulster-British culture are part of our cultural wealth, as is the Irish language, and all should be respected.

“Unfortunately Sinn Fein have been demanding a stand-alone Irish Language Act that takes Irish Gaelic culture out of that diversity and places it above the other cultural traditions.”

Mr McCausland felt the current impasse at Stormont could be resolved by “recognising that the issue of cultural identity lies at the heart of the matter”.

“A Culture Act that values and affirms our indigenous cultural identities and cultural traditions, all of them, including Ulster-Scots, could well be the way forward. It is certainly worth exploring,” he added.

 

, ,

  • MainlandUlsterman

    Does it not bother you that SF offices doubled up as “community justice” centres where local residents were summoned to be judged by Scapaticci and his cronies? Or that witnesses have testified to Adams being present?

  • MainlandUlsterman

    Why haven’t people done that? Is it not seen as a problem?

  • Skibo

    MU for so long in Nationalist areas, there was no impartial policing. The police were the recognised defenders of the Unionist state. Their aims were the preservation of the Unionist hold on power and would do anything to oppose Nationalist thinking and support.
    When there is no justice to be found from the state, the people resolved things themselves. the actions of Scap as a British agent shows they were right not to trust British Justice.

  • Roger

    His preference was the to keep all of the former Ireland in the Union. Would that have been your preference too? He was the same as all other Unionists in that regard. Hardly surprising. When that was out which is when a Northern Ireland came into the frame he was 100% for it. His statue is in front of Stormont House, signaling his stature as a founding father.

  • Jimmyz

    Hello

    Mick do you find death threats acceptable ?

    “Some of my best friends are dead Protestants, Care to join
    them?”

    But don’t bother yourself, I have taken it up with Disqus.

  • file

    Are you sure he was 100% for it? He disappeared quite shortly after its foundation and left the mess to Craig while he went back to Dublin.

  • file

    Not by the people who are members currently, no. But take the An Gobsmacht line, join the GAA in drives in North Down and create a club in your own image called Britons United or something.

  • Roger

    He was 100% for it. That didn’t stop him remaining a Dubliner.

  • file

    If so, that would not be the first error in judgment he made.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    I’m more of a football man

  • MainlandUlsterman

    But they were right to trust Sinn Fein justice? It doesn’t look like it.

  • file

    Do you mean soccer, because there is football within the GAA you know. But hurling is the real game, and one of the illustrations of how outsiders will never understand us.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    I mean football, futbol, voetbal, nogomet, pel-droed. Soccer tends to be used by non-football people, so I insist on football. Lots of other sports claim the word but there is only one football in my eyes.

  • file

    What about rugby football, American football ??? it is a handy word when you need to differentiate which one you are talking about. But normally for me football = soccer right enough.

  • Skibo

    In some ways the justice system in Republican areas worked very well. In some ways it was abused by elements in control, just as it happens in British justice also. As Scap was a British agent, I would actually consider his actions as an element of British justice.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    [jaw drops]

  • Skibo

    Well pick it up. If you had the opportunity of listening the the Nolan programme when such actions are used to control hoodlums in their area, there is surprisingly quite alot of support for it as police action is normally recognised as inaction.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    Is it democratic though on the flags, when people voted in huge numbers for the Good Friday Agreement? The deal was and is UK sovereignty in NI until there’s a change in public opinion on that in NI. No one voted in joint sovereignty.

    I think you’re confusing private and public / state use of flags there.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    Aren’t you letting down the liguistic fraternity/sorority there a bit though eireanne3 by showing such scorn for Scots? All languages and dialects are to be cherished, surely.

  • Katyusha

    AG, I’m not sure where you saw the term “chloclair” but I guess it was in a compound?

    The Irish for Clogher is Clochar, or at least that’s what Clogher Éire Óg uses.

    However nouns in Irish change in the genitive case. So it becomes Gleann an Chlochair – “Clogher Valley” or Coillidh Chlochair – “Killyclogher”.

    Basically Clochar is nominative case and Clochair is genitive case. Same deal as Éire / Éireann. It’s not a neologism unless something terrible has happened to the place in my absence.

  • Dónall

    Irish was spoken in natively in every county in NI in the 20th century. What’s more recordings have been made of the ‘East Ulster’ dialect from all the counties of NI bar Down and Fermanagh (where it died out much earlier than the other counties). The last native speaker from Rathlin died in 1985. Here is a youtube link to a documentary featuring native speakers from Tyrone in 1951 https://youtu.be/h5cvPskVm3Y (you can hear it for yourself if you skip to about three minutes in.)

    Also one quick glance at the 1911 census of Ireland will give you an idea of how many speakers there were. Some have been surprised to find out their own forefathers were Irish speakers. http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/search/

    The point being that for many of us Irish is the language of our grandparents and great grandparents and we deeply regret its demise.

  • John Collins

    Point taken, but how many people of UBE want to join the GAA?

  • John Collins

    Quite frankly Jimmy you know sweet FA about the GAA if you believe they glorify terrorists.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    Probably not many – it has such a history of anti-Britishness.