Should the other Dublin parties denounce Sinn Fein if they’re gaming the Stormont talks?

The Irish Times political editor Stephens Collins enjoys an unusual dual role of senior political reporter and opinionated commentator. It’s not always clear if he’s getting a bead on emerging trends of opinion in politics or simply speaking for himself.  Perhaps what Stephen thinks today,  many of the guys in Leinster House think tomorrow?  Today, he asks the blunt questions about Sinn Fein’s real intentions towards the Assembly.

While most of us were struggling with conflicting feelings, he writes off the McGuinness funeral as basically republican propaganda, Clinton included.   He reaches the conclusion that if Gerry Adams is gaming the  Stormont talks  in order to advance the cause of achieving power in the south, it means Sinn Fein is effectively abandoning the Good Friday Agreement  and  the Dublin government should abandon the long term strategy  of giving aid and support to Sinn Fein’s approach to the North.

The question arises, what different course should Dublin follow? The only one that seems to be available would be to differentiate clearly the  cause of Irish unity  from closer north-south links to cope with Brexit  that most people including Theresa May wants.  This ambiguity has always been a huge problem for unionists and to a lesser extent London. Clearing it up  would make north-south cooperation much easier.

Collins’ message seems designed mainly for Fianna Fail ears.  How big a boost is Sinn Fein in the Republic really receiving  from their success in the North? The result will strongly influence other parties’ behaviour. Do they try to out- green them or become more agnostic in the volatile outlook of today?  Pressing the questions concedes a tactical advantage that the traditional parties of government in the Republic loathe. There is no easy answer.

Extracts

Sinn Féin’s decision to torpedo the Assembly talks belies all the fine words at the McGuinness funeral about the acceptance of compromise as the only basis for a political settlement in Northern Ireland.

The sudden decision to walk away from the talks raises serious questions about whether the party really wants to resurrect the powersharing institutions established by the Belfast Agreement or whether it is now completely focused on achieving power south of the Border.

The next few weeks will tell if Sinn Féin is simply engaged in another bout of political gamesmanship, aimed at pushing the Irish and British governments and all of the other Northern parties into making concessions, or whether it represents a more fundamental shift in strategy.

If Sinn Féin makes it clear in the next few weeks that it is not prepared to engage with the institutions established in 1998 the Government in Dublin will need to take a long, hard look at the strategy it has been following for more than two decades.

That strategy involved giving aid and support to Sinn Féin at every stage in the tortuous negotiations that resulted in the Belfast Agreement and its successors. If the party now effectively abandons the agreement a serious rethink of that approach will be will required

 

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  • ted hagan

    Collins following his usual anti-Sinn Fein agenda. What’s new?

  • Kmac

    Two observations on the extract published above. 1. Sinn Fein did not as suggested torpedo the talks, the DUP failed to show up!!! and 2. What Stephen Collins is calling concessions is nothing more than the implementation of previous agreements. I think these two points alone do little to add credibility to this analysis.

  • the Moor

    ‘Nothing but the same old story’

  • Ciaran O’Neill

    Are Sinn Fein really looking for additional concessions though? I thought they are looking for the implementation of previous agreements. It would be great if someone could list these additional concessions, something Collins should have done hi,self in his article

  • AntrimGael

    Whatever problems the political institutions in tbe North encounter you can rest assured that as sure as day follows night the Southern media will resort to type and blame Sinn Fein, it’s their default position.
    I don’t know if Stephen Collins or the Irish Times wants to move beyond their rabid anti Sinn Fein rhetoric and try to understand the thinking of Northern Nationalists.
    Sinn Fein, particularly Martin McGuinness, and the wider Nationalist community have time and time again over the past 2 decades put every effort into making the political institutions work.
    McGuinness faced death threats, had his home attacked by dissidents and went out on a limb to condemn them. He reached out to the British and Unionism at every opportunity and in return he got a lot of derision, disrespect and bad faith.
    The DUP once again tried to turn Stormont into their sectarian plaything and treated the Nationalist community with total contempt while the British and Irish governments looked the other way. There is only so much humiliation people could take and the last election showed that.
    Stephen Collins and the rest of the partitionist Southern media should move beyond their steretypical comfort zone and think instead of resorting to the common denominator of attacking Sinn Fein ad infinitum. Stephen, for your information, the VAST majority of Northern Nationalists and Republicans SUPPORT Sinn Fein’s current stance.

  • Neil

    Where would Northern Nationalism be without FF though eh? Their unbridled support for SF and Nationalism in NI has really made the difference.

    Guffaw.

  • Vince

    Can anyone clarify a few points for me re: the current impasse? These are genuine questions with no particular “angle” other than trying to develop a better understanding.

    1. When and where was legislation for same sex marriage previously agreed?

    2. Why do we need a Bill of Rights when we are presumably covered by the European Human Rights Act?

    3. Why has an Irish Language Act become such an issue now when it was not prior to December 2016 and if it had been previously agreed? Was it the withdrawal of the Liofa funding?

    4. If correctly reported, why has the offer (apparently made in recent talks) of an Irish Language/Ulster Scots Act been rejected?

    5. Why are Unionists (in general) so pleased, and Nationalists (in general) so worried about Brexit when it seems to make a UI more, rather than less likely in the longer term.

    Thanks

  • Redstar

    He reaches the conclusion that if Gerry Adams is gaming the Stormont talks in order to advance the cause of achieving power in the south, it means Sinn Fein is effectively abandoning the Good Friday Agreement and the Dublin government should abandon the long term strategy of giving aid and support to Sinn Fein’s approach to the North.

    Eh? When did they ever do that?????

  • Roger

    Ulster Scots is great. I love it when they have written translations of it. You can have a go reading it.

  • Gavin Smithson

    Isn’t he entitled to be anti SF? Dear me

  • Gavin Smithson

    Unionists are worried that ILA will introduce structural discrimination against Protestants and indeed others who do not speak Irish with respect to getting public sector jobs

  • Croiteir

    Yes – and others are entitled to point it out – dear me

  • Croiteir

    Why would a language with discriminate against Protestants? Would it discriminate, for example, against Catholics who could not speak it?

  • Ciaran O’Neill

    It won’t be a job requirement for people to speak Irish in the public sector. Quite frankly that would be absolute nonsense and something that Irish speakers would not want or sign up to themselves. That isn’t something that anyone is asking for and while it might be a legitimate fear of yours Gavin, it simply doesn’t have any basis in fact or reality

  • Simian Droog

    I believe in psychoanalytic terms that would be called “projection”

  • Jeffrey Peel

    I think he absolutely hits the nail on the head. The McGuinness funeral, ironically, has been viewed through much more cynical eyes South of the border than here. As Adams has admitted, SF like nothing more than a crisis. But, ironically, I think the entire strategy is going very sour. Few (apart from the inevitable noisy remainiacs) think Brexit is going to be that big a deal. There’s now a clear consensus re. the open border (even the EU Commission has joined the Party). A free trade deal is looking very, very likely. There is no real alternative for the EU – certainly not for Germany, who calls all the shots anyway. And, meanwhile, public services will run and be funded, miraculously, without the need for photo-calls with near-hysterical politicians on the steps of Stormont. But we really need to pull their salaries ASAP.

  • andrewjohn

    Is this article real or is it made up?

  • Ciaran O’Neill

    It is hilarious though. Wait until they change leader soon, it’ll be even more funny watching all the Gerry haters actually wish that he was still leader

  • Kevin Breslin

    And Jeff, just think in an united Ireland you can have that much more cynical press in operation on a regular basis.

  • ted hagan

    And be a ‘neutral’ political reporter while at the same time enjoying the role of a very biased commentator? Dear me.

  • Neil

    Imagine if you can the bizarre spectacle of the Dublin parties condemning SF. I just can’t do it. It’s like trying to visualise time or contemplate infinity.

  • Brian Walker

    I understand the attacks on Collin and the article. My question is, not how you want the other southern parties to respond but how will/should they respond if the talks finally end in limbo? I don’t assume all blame to Sinn Fein of course not. But you might reflect on whether giving it to Easter leaves enough time for completion on such a fundamental and wide agenda that only in November a year ago, SF seemed content to leave to a five year Assembly term. If you can manage just a minute of detachment I’d be fascinated to hear a direct answer that doesn’t recap on all the DUP’s sins etc

    Any takers?

  • Brian Walker

    Jeffrey, while you’re not a tube for saying it, the salaries issue is surely not a fundamental point. They’ll surely be under threat anyway of this drags on much beyond Easter.

  • Jeffrey Peel

    It annoys them so it’s worth saying.

  • Jeffrey Peel

    We’ll all be Anglo-Irish soon.

  • Kevin Breslin

    Because the English are getting Irish passports in their droves, okay right.

    As long as it’s in a united Ireland free from Westminster, and Westminster free from it I don’t mind. Healthy distance is important for good friendships.

  • Kevin Breslin

    Why did the DUP put the Military Covenant into a “Culture Act”?

    Do you really think they are going to make progress confabulating spoken languages to the much more socially divisive issue of perks to military personnel?

    Secondly the vast majority of pro-EU Nationalists genuinely believe that Brexit is bad for Unionists and Nationalists, Brits and Irish people alike, why do pro-Brexit Unionists struggle so much getting Nationalists on board with their argument, and leave it to the Des Daltons who think a major benefit of Brexit is increasing nationalist intolerance of the Union, partition, ideological slavery to British imperialism and the neo-liberal European capitalist model?

  • Paul Culloty

    In general, the attitude of the Republic towards the North is that the GFA was the final resolution, and consequently, it’s up to the NI parties to deal with their own issues. Technically, the SDLP shares common membership with Irish Labour, similar to how the NI Greens operate, but in practice, the Dublin party leaves Eastwood and Co entirely to their own devices, and in truth their treatment by Southern politicians since 1998 has been politically negligent. In truth, the reality is that there’s little to gain by Dublin through intervening in Stormont, given that the principle of power-sharing has been constitutionally enshrined.

  • Donagh

    “The McGuinness funeral, ironically, has been viewed through much more cynical eyes South of the border than here. ”

    Sorry to break it to you pal, but that is spectacularly untrue. Might be true of the usual hacks but the funeral brought a whole new level of understanding and appreciation of McGuinness by the average Joe.

  • andrewjohn

    Because the people on the grrund have led SF to where they are right now, not the other way around. They stuck with SF while the party rolled over but they ran out of patience before the party did. The parties in the South resent the fact that SF has completely upended the status quo merrygoround of FF/FG and Labour. Its a long time past since they have rowed in behind SF in relation to the North. They can’t do it now because of the electoral threat but at the same time they are stuck because they also know SF are perfectly justified in their approach to the talks vis a vis outstanding issues.

  • Ciaran74

    Balls.

  • Brian Walker

    Not quite.. implementation left some discretion to the Assembly on both an Irish language strategy and an HR Bill. I agree that pressure to implement is not by itself unreasonable. But it depends whether its worth freezing the institutions indefintely when they didnt seem so urgent 18 months ago. Adams has I see rejected a composite Bill from the DUP. Lets not pass final judgement yet.

  • Brian Walker

    See above and numerous posts

  • Brian Walker

    Then like everybody else including Slugger comment they should work on details rather than indulging fears

  • Brian Walker

    So what do the people on the ground want to do now? Negotiations unfortunately are elite not popular activities.

  • Brian Walker

    Both sides are accusing the other. Good reason for moving on?..

  • AntrimGael

    First of all a senior political reporter and an opinionated commentator is a conflict of interest. A good journalist should set out the facts in a clear and balanced way and let the public make up their minds. When the same journalist gives an opinion he/she is directly or indirectly influencing the news agenda and that renders their journalistic role null and void.
    Secondly to label Martin McGuinness’s funeral as merely Republican propaganda is an insult and clearly sets out the hostile tone of the writer from tbe start. Where Bill Clinton, Mike Nesbitt, Arlene Foster, Michael D Higgins, Mary McAleese, several Taiseoch, Protestant clergymen etc willingly part of an orchestrated Republican rally?
    Thirdly 6 months ago, YES Sinn Fein signed up to a 5 year agreement with the DUP BUT many Nationalists and Republicans were deeply unhappy at the insipid performance of Sinn Fein within tbe Assembly and the antics of the DUP. Sinn Fein were clearly out of step with their constituency. RHI, Brexit and deeply offensive DUP bigotry towards tbe Nationalist community changed all that, Sinn Fein soon realised they HAD been detached from their electorate as they were forcibly told on the doorsteps during the election.
    Nationalists WANTED the political institutions to work but only on the basis of equality and the implementation of existing Agreements. Sinn Fein know under NO circumstances can they go back into the same scenario.
    Instead of castigating Sinn Fein Stephen Collins and the Southern political and media Establishments should be asking why the DUP and British governments did not hold to existing agreements? The British government cannot now undermine the GFA and introduce legislation to suspend the Assembly, they must move to another election under existing Agreements.

  • Kevin Breslin

    Oh Jeff, if Indy Ref 2 is in the works maybe Good Friday Agreement 2 could be in the works also.

  • Kevin Breslin

    Ahem Remainians. Mulțumesc!

  • Fear Éireannach

    I’m no admirer of Sinn Féin, but if they are to be accused of gamesmanship then we have to identify what they are doing that is unreasonable. What are they asking for that is beyond what they should be asking for? The Irish language act should have been in the original GFA, it was agreed a decade ago, just get on with it. I don’t personally agree with Gay marriage, but it is not the proper use of petition of concern. SF were not the first to suggest that Arlene Foster would have to stand down for a period, so that is not unique to them either.
    If someone can say that SF are asking for something unreasonable them they are the problem, if what they ask is reasonable and the DUP won’t agree then the DUP is the problem.

    What is unreasonable about present SF requests?

  • Granni Trixie

    Forgive me if I’m wrong but I had the Impression that in common usage ‘nationalists’ refers to SDLP supporters and ‘Republicans’ refers to SF supporters – key difference being one is associated with the physical force tradition and the other a non violence tradition. You and some others write as thOugh the SDLP does not exist and SF encapsulates both traditiOns.

  • Granni Trixie

    So you admit Sf are the wreckers? Come an election that will not be a good look for whatever you say people on the ground look to politicians to work out the problems and bring home stability.

  • Ciaran O’Neill

    The mainstream media in the south have always been critical of Sinn Fein and it’s always brought up some interesting contradictions. Take current Taoiseach Enda Kenny for example, when McGuinness died, he took to the cameras and talked of McGuinness being a “terrorist”. Fair do’s, he can say what he likes and the words were to be expected I suppose. The issue most people pointed to though was the fact that he did this beneath a picture of Michael Collins. That’s Michael Collins, former IRA leader, violent robber of banks and post offices, executor of informants and policemen and all-round mayhem maker. An individual who probobly gave the direct order to kill more people than McGuinness did. Fact. That nobody in the mainstream southern media could pin Kenny down to an actual televised interview and thoroughly question him on this bizarre paradox is neither here nor there, millions of Irish people saw it, thought it and discussed it both off and on-line.

    It’s similar to the awkward position the southern establishment and mainstream media found itself in last year for the centenary of the Easter Rising. As part of a commemorative piece in remembering the events of 1916, the Irish Times reproduced it’s own issues that were published round about the time of the Rising; an interesting and very worthwhile thing to do. When reproducing the issue that was published the day after the Rising though, they deliberately changed the original headlines from the day in 1916 to omit the words Sinn Fein from the headline “Sinn Fein Rebellion in Ireland” in the reproduced version. God knows what they were afraid of had they simply republished the original headline, but sadly a group of people at editorial level thought it would mean that the Shinners would be seen as “winning” and therefore it would be best if they simply airbrushed part of their own institution’s history out of the picture. The optics are more important than the facts you see Jeff.

    There’s always been a revisionist approach to politics and history in Ireland’s media. The truth it seems, is never allowed a place on the front pages, column inches or on the airwaves. There’s a constant “battle” with Irish republicanism without actually engaging in a meaningful critique of it. I’ve never heard one single, reasonably sourced and articulately put argument from anyone ever in my life that states categorically why this country should in the long term, continue to be partitioned with a constitutional monarchy system of government in the north east as opposed to having a sovereign, independent 32 county republic in charge of it’s own affairs. Nobody has ever, ever told me why my future is better with Britain, a quite mesmerizing fact given that I’ve been surrounded by British media, tv, radio and unionist opinion my whole life. Not once have I heard it and to be honest, I don’t think any of us will ever hear it. The focus of the media has always been to portray Irish republicans and Irish republicanism as simply violent, almost subhuman and unworthy of recognition and debate. Whatever the issue, it’s the fault of Sinn Fein and republicans. That’s part of the reason the UVF and UDA go around unchallenged, undisturbed and still exist to this day, much to shame of unionism and the United Kingdom. That these organisations are still in existence and active in the year 2017 speaks volumes about modern day Britishness in Ireland and indeed modern day Britishness in general. But Martin McGuinness is the baddie

  • Mark Petticrew

    They may not have been so urgent 18 months ago, but through pulling the plug and saying that there’d be no return to the status quo unless it’s on terms acceptable to Sinn Féin, they’ve re-engaged nationalist voters; instructing them to apply such urgency now.

    If Sinn Féin are to de-freeze on their freezing of the institutions without something to show for it, they’ll effectively be reneging on a stance which formed the actual basis of such nationalist re-engagement.

    Speaking in a purely partisan context, it would be stupid for the Shinners to buckle now.

  • JOHN TURLEY

    Do not forget the great work of the John Unionist party in support of Sinn Fein or Garret when he saw the support of the Shinners at 10%, he said he would have to get back into power to try and stop their growth.

  • Jollyraj

    There’ll be a certain kind of moron who’d vote for them whatever they did, but yes, I think a fair slice of floating voters might swtch to the SDLP to prevent this ridiculous time-wasting by SF from costing us all in the longer term.

  • Ciaran O’Neill

    The vast majority of nationalists are behind Sinn Fein 100%. Why do you think so many of them came out to vote again? In the recent election they campaigned on the basis that there would be no return to the status quo. Everything in life isn’t SF’s fault

  • andrewjohn

    I would imagine they would wish the parties to fulfil past commiitments and get on with governing.

  • erasmus

    I’ll attempt a partial answer to number 5. Brexit — which is bound to an (as yet unclear) extent to accentuate the border — is ipso facto anathema to nationalists. In narrow party political terms this angst can be harvested by the nationalist parties — especially SF. This angst will also tend nationalists towards a more absolutist position: pro-UI.

  • Barneyt

    And it was hardly sudden

  • Barneyt

    Let’s say we have a freeze and brokenshire successfully legislated for direct rule. This is likely to soften and perhaps divide unionism and it will only strengthen the nat/reps. It’s brilliant.They collapsed the institution due to failure to introduce the Irish language act, address legacy issues and deal with corruption which can only be done with Arlene stepping out for a bit. No concessions were given and these were mostly prescribed in laid down agreements. So far SF can’t go wrong. Then not only can we not reform the exec but London steps in and takes us back 10 years. Add to this the effects of brexit and the psychological repartition of Ireland. Fluid to hard border will have that feel. For unionists it will do one of two things. Reaffirm their sense of belonging or cause others to remember what paisley said, “we can rule ourselves”. Scotland and Wales will perhaps enjoy further devolution to stave off a revolt. We turn into Finchley. Just a thought

  • Barneyt

    First part is nearly right. SDLP were described as mostly nationalist, as they had/have a small Protestant following who have no left leaning outlet. Not taking a violent path does not give the SDLP raison detre. Republicanism itself was split along those lines, which gave rise to the provisional sf and provisional Ira. At this time ( 72) the official sf remained and had an official Ira. The officials elected to take a political path and were more left leaning. They also were prepared to recognise the dail. Provisionals took a different path. Then of course the officials produced another organisation in 75 with a political wing and active wing. Irsp/inla who were both republican socialist and Irish nationalists .

  • Jeffrey Peel

    Aye, droves.

  • JOHN TURLEY

    The usual set of journalists are in panic mode, Adams has led his party to their best election ever, that was
    not expected.Collins is well entitled to give his opinion. I do not believe Gerry will give it much heed. i certainly do not know what his plans, It is interesting to note how many journlists are invoking the name of John Hume now..
    they certainly were not there when he needed some support Some of us are old enough to remember
    the venom that came with the Sunday Independent..Mr Collins is well entitled to lash at Sinn Fein if he
    wishes however,he is not an impartial reporter.The best way that Fine Gael and Fianna Fail can confront the
    Shinners is with their own candidates in the North.In fact i heard Adams inviting them to do just that,.he even said he would welcome them.

  • Granni Trixie

    You’ve hit the nail on the head! Now is the time for sf to live up their pre election commitments and show they can reach agreements with everyone else ‘as Martin would gave done’.

  • andrewjohn

    You are wrong. The SDLP would also regard themselves as Republicans similar to FF.

  • Granni Trixie

    I doubt that. I know many SDLP supporters in my area and they strongly try to distinguish themselves from the physical force tradition, Republicans, if you will.

  • Granni Trixie

    Thank you for explaining this.

  • eamoncorbett

    I agree with you on the free trade bit , but there is one little matter that you haven’t mentioned and it’s that statement by the EU that Britain cannot enjoy the same privileges as actual members do . I take that to mean that free trade is going to cost much the same as what’s being paid in at the moment and there will be an immmigration quota that Britain will be obliged to accept. As for SF , I’m not a supporter , but as a general observation I can see no stopping them , but unionists could decide to work instead with the Irish government in a new arrangement outside the GFA to run NI but then they probably prefer the internal eternal battle that has no end.

  • epg_ie

    Playing the man not the ball? If the person is in Sinn Féin or is Naomi Long, the rules round here are different.

  • Oggins

    Brian there are fears and just senseless rambling

  • eamoncorbett

    Whilst I agree in general with your assessment with regards to Dublin , it is limited in what it can do because of the internal settlement in relation to that strand of the GFA . Dublin was excluded from being joint chair of the talks on powersharing and it is this deficit in my view that is contributing to the impasse in Stormont . SF have the bit between the teeth now and they view Unionism and the British as 2 cheeks etc. they also know that blame is a subjective thing and the Brits can’t deploy sanctions for misbehaviour.
    With regard to the Southern mainstream parties and media they’re not that bothered as long as one or other of them can hold on to power in coalition with independents , although rural FFrs wouldn’t object to coalition with SF.

  • eamoncorbett

    Everything on this site is either opinion , speculation ,lies, or sheer invective.

  • North Down dup

    Your Romanian is very good

  • andrewjohn

    Then you simply do not understand irish politics.

  • Granni Trixie

    Does anyone?

  • Skibo

    People keep talking about stalling the Assembly but what they are doing is standing on the political mandate given to them by the electorate. Is that not what politics is all about?

  • Ben De Hellenbacque

    Cf: Sellar & Yeatman, the Irish Question.

  • Skibo

    Brian those indulging in fears are the ones saying that SF demands are too great yet they are covered within the previous agreements. If the DUP and the British Government cannot confirm they will fulfil agreements that are 19 and 11 years old, how can anyone trust them to stand over anything they will agree to in the next couple of weeks?

  • Skibo

    I want Southern parties to advise all parties to come to agreement with an impartial attitude. The problem is no other parties within NI stand against them and if they just focus on SF, they are playing party politics with the negotiations to better their position in elections in the South.
    Where should the discussions on agreement be focused on?
    Should the GFA or St Andrews agreements have to be renegotiated? If not should the parties all get on the same level and agree that the previous agreements have to be fulfilled and now negotiate the outstanding issues.
    How do we expect parties to now go back and re-negotiate the GFA or St Andrews?

  • Skibo

    Granni that is grand but there are parts of the previous agreements that have not been fulfilled. How can further issues be negotiated if the previous ones have not been resolved? Are you expecting issues that should have been fulfilled to be put back on the table and used for bartering. There is only so many times you can pay for a pig in a poke!

  • Skibo

    Vince the Irish Language Act has always been an issue. It was not addressed previously as Unionism controlled the culture arts and leisure dept. When SF held the post, they put together proposals on an Irish Language act but they were rejected out of hand.
    When DUP then took back the dept controlling culture, they started rolling back of policies trying to improve the reach of the Irish language. That showed they could not be trusted to protect the Irish language without legislation.
    legislation is required on all aspects of life to ensure equality otherwise unprotected rights can be used and abused as trinkets and beads for negotiations at a later date.
    I do not require legislation on equal marriage for myself. I am happily married and have been for 30 years. That does not mean I should not stand up for the rights of same sex couples to be allowed the same access to marriage.

  • The Living End

    SF would be letting their electorate down if they attempt to reach agreement with parties who are – right now – flatly refusing to honour agreements previously reached. SF’s electorate are expecting them to ensure implementation of all outstanding issues before moving forward.

  • Vince

    Thanks Skibo, I appreciate the feedback & clarification, & understand the sentiments.

  • erasmus

    Quite so. These are two horses (impartial, objective political analyst and partisan polemecist) that cannot be simultaneously ridden. One articulate and urba’NE’ journalist who writes for the Irish Times and is frequently highlighted by Mick is a classic of the genre. His media output since AE17 has been one long tune whistled past the grave.

  • JOHN TURLEY

    people were hoping for that to happen for years, yet the gap between the two parties
    seems to be larger now than ever.