Has the DUP taken their first public steps to back a Brexit?

Sammy Wilson issued an interesting press release today highlighting his attendance at Leave EU event and even had his picture taken with the UKIP leader, Nigel Farage. IMG_0091

Speaking after the event the East Antrim MP set out his reasoning for why he wants to leave the EU;

It is evident from the pathetic demand for minimal changes to the terms of our membership of the EU, that the Prime Minister was not serious about ensuring that the UK got a better deal from Europe and the only course of action was to negotiate a relationship which fell short of EU membership.

We need to have control over our own destiny, to determine our own laws and to protect businesses and families from the financial burdens imposed by the EU membership.

Currently 65 per cent of our laws are made and imposed from the EU commission with no accountability. Our membership costs this country £12bn each year, and we have a trade deficit with Europe of over £70bn at the same time we are prevented from making our own trade agreements with those countries in the world which are growing and are tied to the trade policies of the stagnating European economies.

It is time for a change. We can have the best of both worlds, access to the European market but freedom to determine our own laws and trading arrangements. There are those who argue that being outside the E U would disadvantage us economically. They said the same thing about our decision not to joint the Eurozone. They were wrong on that issue and they are equally wrong on the question of EU membership.

Given the determination of the majority of EU institutions and the heads of the major states in Europe to forge a federal Europe in which all countries would be corralled into a one size fits all Europe superstate, the U.K. would be better off out.

An important health warning comes here, Sammy is known to be much more strident on the European issue within the DUP and the party still has not made a formal decision about whether it will back a vote to stay or go.

My understanding is that the party are no fans of the EU, but the devil will be in the detail of what Cameron brings back from his renegotiation.

DUP EU

Page 16 of DUP Westminster Manifesto 2015

If you’re wondering, the stated DUP party policy remains at the moment, the same as that set out in their 2015 Westminster manifesto.

 

, , ,

  • Robin Keogh

    Across the water a recent poll showing a slim majority in favour of exit has heightened the atmosphere a bit. Every vote might be priceless come election day.

  • 23×7

    Cut corporation tax and leave the EU. Genius.

  • Robin Keogh

    Economics? No, its the plantation stupid !

  • Nevin

    David, Arlene Foster doesn’t appear to be too far behind Sammy:

    “Do I believe it (the EU) needs reform? Absolutely. It is no secret that we are a eurosceptic (party) – I think we would like him (British Prime Minister David Cameron) to be a little more ambitious (in negotiations).” .. 24 November 2015

  • technopolitics

    Naive. Myopic. Stupid. Insane.

  • Ernekid

    I reckon when it comes to the EU referendum it’ll be.

    Stay In
    SDLP
    Sinn Fein
    Alliance
    Green Party
    Most of the UUP including Mike Nesbitt

    Leave
    UKIP
    TUV
    DUP
    and a couple of UUP rebels.

    Not quite an Orange and Green split but close to it. The UUP will probably follow the line of the UFU which will be proEuropean which could cause an another internal split in Unionism. The strain of Eurosceptic Little Ulsterism could cause all sorts of divisions for unionists even though they know the rational option will be to stay in.

  • CB Belfast

    Putting aside the fact that their views on this are largely irrelevant – this is pure politics. They say they aren’t ‘fans’ of Europe, but I struggle to understand how they think a Brexit could possibly benefit Northern Ireland.

    My guess is that they’ll act Eurosceptic up until the referendum and then sit on the fence when it comes to the actual vote (it’s up to the people to decide). That will avoid difficult questions if we were to leave.

  • CB Belfast

    I still doubt that’s how it’ll pan out. 55-45 to remain.

  • Kevin Breslin

    Unionists & NI sections of GB parties possibly leaning Stay In: –

    NI21, UUP, PUP, local Conservatives, Labour UK and Liberal Democrats , Some Unionist Independents e.g. Herman

    Irish Nationalists/ROI parties/All Ireland Parties leaning Leave –

    None* except there is only one “movement” called the National Platform that advocates Leaving. Most Irish (and possibly Northern Irish) Euro-skeptics are pro-reform than pro-leave.

    (and I’ve checked dissident republicans and far left groups, skeptical but not Leavers)

  • Chingford Man

    Staying in the Fourth Reich would be all those things.

  • Kevin Breslin

    It is interesting that Leave.EU seems to be the one that’s being more prolific in Northern Ireland.

    Leave.EU is the “Faragian” Pressure group, linked to the Brugges Group and funded by Blackwells. While Vote Leave is the “Carswell” Pressure group including Trimble and Hoey and Patterson funded by John Caudwell and Phones4U. One is populist (Leave.EU) and the other seems to be tied to a political elite.

    Britian Stronger in Europe is the rival movement, it is lead by Stuart Rose.

  • Ernekid

    You’re always great for a bit of comedy CM

  • technopolitics

    A split in the UUP? Nooooooo!!!!

  • technopolitics

    What happens if Brexit goes through, supported by NI, and then Scotland demands an independence referendum, and that passes on the back of Brexit?

    Unionism needs to represent an independent identity; tied to a disintegrating Britain it will collapse in upon itself, and that would be really messy.

  • Kevin Breslin

    Personally I disagree Europe is driven by the Eurofederalists, it is very much driven by right wing nationalist Eurosceptics, each defending the interests of their nation state.

    Sammy is moaning about the inability to make trade deals outside of Europe, but the UK is making deals with China, and the inability of the UK to make its own laws but the UK was able to reject EU legislation on prisoner voting rights, then lack of UK influence in the EU, but a nation with an eight of the total EU population was still able to block the Tobin Tax and have the EU budget cut at the demands of the UK government.

    Former British and French colonies in Africa have effectively left the European Union, they are signing up to deals with the EU much like Norway and Switzerland. The UK was able to reject 35% of European laws and sign up to 65% because of its independence, most of these 65% laws the UK would sign up willingly too, the small bits it wouldn’t would be areas that any arrangement of bi-laterals could possibly compromise anyway.

    The EU is a scapegoat for decisions national governments take (UK lead cuts to CAP with only 1 domestic fund for anything like agriculture) and factors beyond its control (Global Recession), and it also gets blamed for not protecting waning national privileges in the international community that would have to be earned not given, earning that would require work, associations and compromise whether that nation was in the EU or not.

  • murdockp

    the northern ireland economy would be destroyed by a brexit. firstly we would be cut of from our largest trading partner ROI.

    British standards of manufacture would no longer be European standards and our exports would have to be retested and certified for export. food could no longer be exported with out import duties and farmers would loose thier subsidies this is just for starters.

    exporting to the US would be more difficult too given the US / EU trade agreements.

    like many of Sammy thoughts this is pure bonkers. forget about the catholics, but the unionist farmers would be destroyed.

    unless Sammy wants to sit in his armchair with financially secure with his ministers and teachers pensions watching border controls being brought in whilst NI slides into poverty.

  • murdockp

    He who upsets the NI farmers will lose.

    DUP need to be careful what they wish for.

    PS look at farage ‘s handshake. one of those three finger I don’t want to shake your hand hand shakes.

  • Kevin Breslin

    Agreed, voices from the Ulster Farmer’s Union could make more of an impact on swing voters than any political party might.

    Civic groups usually hold the balance of power in these issues

  • Kevin Breslin

    Leaving the EU would allow it to cut corporation tax further with UK subsidization. Not that the EVEL UKIPers and EVEL Tory backbenchers would be happy with that.

  • Ernest Blofeld

    Sammy is pushing for brexit as the EU ensures health and safety for windee cleaners ladders..Sammy would like to see a ban on all but three step ladders.

  • Ernest Blofeld

    Did the border reivers ask to come to Ireland or did London force them off their land ?

  • barnshee

    The trade balance is heavily biased in favour of the ROI
    What business would be lost?

    The booze transfers alone north dwarf any traffic south

  • aquifer

    DUP to wreck another Union. No surprises then.

  • terence patrick hewett

    Will Project Fear trump Real Fear?

  • Dan

    Sammy Wilson would do better to join UKIP. By and large his opinions correspond with theirs and he’d be a more powerful player on the UK stage in doing so.
    Sign up, Sammy.

  • whatif1984true

    It would certainly slow down a united Ireland. What if Scotland and Republic stayed in and England/Wales/NI stayed out plus Trident moved to NI. What a result.

  • Galena

    Not surprising they are in favour of a vote but if it looks like a Brexit is on the cards you can be sure that any threat to the CAP gravy train will soon change their tune.

  • Oriel27

    But will Unionist always be in power in NI?

    How have they the right to determine whats in the interest of everyone?

    With changing demographics, NI is becoming greener, there is a real possibility that the first minister will be a nationalist in future.

    This whole DUP move (especially regards to Jefferies offer of relocation of nuclear weapons to NI) smells of complete unionist desperation, fear of a UI.

    They will sacrifice their economic prosperity (which is guaranteed by remaining in EU) just so that they can be part of the UK. NI offers nothing to the UK.
    NI’s future would be better served in a UI, in the EU, using the euro.

  • Kevin Breslin

    UKIP vs. DUP

    24 MEPs (26.6% of UK-EP 3%) vs. One MEP (0.8% of UK-EP 0.1%)- “Undemocratic” Europe

    One MP (12.6% UK vote WM 0.1%) vs. Eight MPs(0.6% of UK vote WM1.2%) – “Democratic” Wesminster

    Bizarrely Westminster is so “democratic” that a party gets nearly 30 times greater share of the seats in a Parliament representing an eight times higher population than it does in its (own slightly smaller Parliament) with its vote only halved.

  • Kevin Breslin

    well as Susan Jeffers says.

  • Reader

    Neither really, I think. Or both. When law enforcement got the upper hand it turned out that the land couldn’t support a growing population without (cough) external sources of income. So a load of people went west.

  • Ernst Blofeld

    And when the planters got settled there was widespread inter marriage between natives and planters which certainly upset the Jesuits and london.. who as an aside are controlled by the same elites..but nothing a wee false flag pogrom in 1641 couldn’t fix. A trick London would use again and again over hundreds of years to divide planter and native

  • Reader

    Ernst Blofeld: …controlled by the same elites…but nothing a wee false flag pogrom in 1641 couldn’t fix.
    Blimey. And to think I thought you were a benign troll!

  • terence patrick hewett

    Well Kev. When you experience Real Fear it is like love: it is cathartic. You understand exactly what you are for better or for worse, with all the b*llsh*t stripped away. And I for one felt very close to the humanity of my ancestors.

    And this generation’s sub-urban mankind has never exprienced it. Yet.

  • Am Ghobsmacht

    If a brexit came to pass then would this mean a more obvious border (as opposed to the current border which tends to be heralded by petrol stations)?

    If so then is this reinforcement not likely to slay a few Catholic union-voting unicorns?

    The lip service paid to the border is as far as i can see one of a number of aspects that causes these unicorns to think that maybe staying in the UK is not so bad.

    So, enforcing the border could be seen as something that would cause them to rethink the arrangemt.

    Emphasising how ‘British ‘ NI is a clearly flawed and self defeating strategy from the unionist perspective and an obvious border would fall into that camp.

    How the DUP or other unionists can’t see this very obvious leviathan is alarming.

  • Am Ghobsmacht

    If a brexit came to pass then would this mean a more obvious border (as opposed to the current border which tends to be heralded by petrol stations)?

    If so then is this reinforcement not likely to slay a few Catholic union-voting unicorns?

    The lip service paid to the border is as far as i can see one of a number of aspects that causes these unicorns to think that maybe staying in the UK is not so bad.

    So, enforcing the border could be seen as something that would cause them to rethink the arrangemt.

    Emphasising how ‘British ‘ NI is a clearly flawed and self defeating strategy from the unionist perspective and an obvious border would fall into that camp.

    How the DUP or other unionists can’t see this very obvious leviathan is alarming.

  • Kevin Breslin

    There are some Real Fears in the European debate, there is a genuine fear of change that can seriously jeopardise jobs and the way a company does business. Leaving the EU may be more of a risk to some than to others. Some people may be nihilistic about potential job losses but care whole heartedly about flags or something.

    Many people who are into the EU do have to take risks, risks are unavoidable in global capitalism.

    To me the No campaign is majority risk-adverse, maybe more so than the Yes campaign which is surprising because you’d think the side of the status quo would not be. Leavers have a split personality, one side will overemphasis the risks of being in the EU but will deny the slightest risk or indeed change that might happen domestically. This is protectionism, it might be protection with some limited freetrade but it is still based on protectionism and a do your own thing mentality. They have a dishonest sense of security in a world that doesn’t offer it.

    It’s bizarre when held in comparison to Scotish and Irish nationalism where the courage of taking risks and pioneering is really at the heart of the campaign for independence.

    The majority side seem to sell the benefits of doing nothing. The Lisbon Treaty does allow some room for negotiation upon leaving but adopt an insular mentality and resort to national stereotypes some of the benign xenophobic impulses (literally I mean fear of strangeness) might drive the UK towards a protectionist bubble.

    There is a minority that isn’t risk adverse, that really think it is a gamble that can pay off if the UK plays its cards right. This is the business end of the Leavers campaign and risks are a part of that business, knowing risks are a part of business. To me this minority tends to be the more educated, more calculated, and to some extent the least influential socially. However they for the most part have no answers for what a Brexit UK looks like.
    Some are even quite cynical, wanting to leave the EU to escape Human rights legislation or environmental legislation trying to profit from the freedom of exploitation and pollution.

    I don’t know what the UK offers outside the EU in terms of bilateral trade, in the past it’s not be so simple to have trade deals lopsided and the Opium Wars and Boston Tea Party are great examples of the U.K. being able to determine “its trade with the world”. The U.K. Key strength in my opinion is the large number of willing partners from the US, the Commonwealth, in Europe and beyond without favouritism.

    When it comes to India and China, there isn’t a strong consensus on what these countries actually want from a UK that doesn’t make stuff anymore, particularly stuff that isn’t reliant on a pan European subvention or supply chain. There’s very little enthusiasm about developing language skills or cultural awareness of these countries and their regions.

    This is a major cultural shift, and ther’s very little clarity about what exactly the UK’s economic competive advantage would be globally, it used to be the financial sector but it, like Switzerland is being forced to move away from that. Europe is a big block that can compete with the USAs, China’s and India. Africa and Asia have their own economic unions. The Harking back to Empire mentality is doing nothing to recreate it.

  • Kevin Breslin

    There are some Real Fears in the European debate, there is a genuine fear of change that can seriously jeopardise jobs and the way a company does business. Leaving the EU may be more of a risk to some than to others. Some people may be nihilistic about potential job losses but care whole heartedly about flags or something.

    Many people who are into the EU do have to take risks, risks are unavoidable in global capitalism.

    To me the No campaign is majority risk-adverse, maybe more so than the Yes campaign which is surprising because you’d think the side of the status quo would not be. Leavers have a split personality, one side will overemphasis the risks of being in the EU but will deny the slightest risk or indeed change that might happen domestically. This is protectionism, it might be protection with some limited freetrade but it is still based on protectionism and a do your own thing mentality. They have a dishonest sense of security in a world that doesn’t offer it.

    It’s bizarre when held in comparison to Scotish and Irish nationalism where the courage of taking risks and pioneering is really at the heart of the campaign for independence.

    The majority side seem to sell the benefits of doing nothing. The Lisbon Treaty does allow some room for negotiation upon leaving but adopt an insular mentality and resort to national stereotypes some of the benign xenophobic impulses (literally I mean fear of strangeness) might drive the UK towards a protectionist bubble.

    There is a minority that isn’t risk adverse, that really think it is a gamble that can pay off if the UK plays its cards right. This is the business end of the Leavers campaign and risks are a part of that business, knowing risks are a part of business. To me this minority tends to be the more educated, more calculated, and to some extent the least influential socially. However they for the most part have no answers for what a Brexit UK looks like.
    Some are even quite cynical, wanting to leave the EU to escape Human rights legislation or environmental legislation trying to profit from the freedom of exploitation and pollution.

    I don’t know what the UK offers outside the EU in terms of bilateral trade, in the past it’s not be so simple to have trade deals lopsided and the Opium Wars and Boston Tea Party are great examples of the U.K. being able to determine “its trade with the world”. The U.K. Key strength in my opinion is the large number of willing partners from the US, the Commonwealth, in Europe and beyond without favouritism.

    When it comes to India and China, there isn’t a strong consensus on what these countries actually want from a UK that doesn’t make stuff anymore, particularly stuff that isn’t reliant on a pan European subvention or supply chain. There’s very little enthusiasm about developing language skills or cultural awareness of these countries and their regions.

    This is a major cultural shift, and ther’s very little clarity about what exactly the UK’s economic competive advantage would be globally, it used to be the financial sector but it, like Switzerland is being forced to move away from that. Europe is a big block that can compete with the USAs, China’s and India. Africa and Asia have their own economic unions. The Harking back to Empire mentality is doing nothing to recreate it.

  • Kevin Breslin

    There are some Real Fears in the European debate, there is a genuine fear of change that can seriously jeopardise jobs and the way a company does business. Leaving the EU may be more of a risk to some than to others. Some people may be nihilistic about potential job losses but care whole heartedly about flags or something.

    Many people who are into the EU do have to take risks, risks are unavoidable in global capitalism.

    To me the No campaign is majority risk-adverse, maybe more so than the Yes campaign which is surprising because you’d think the side of the status quo would not be. Leavers have a split personality, one side will overemphasis the risks of being in the EU but will deny the slightest risk or indeed change that might happen domestically. This is protectionism, it might be protection with some limited freetrade but it is still based on protectionism and a do your own thing mentality. They have a dishonest sense of security in a world that doesn’t offer it.

    It’s bizarre when held in comparison to Scotish and Irish nationalism where the courage of taking risks and pioneering is really at the heart of the campaign for independence.

    The majority side seem to sell the benefits of doing nothing. The Lisbon Treaty does allow some room for negotiation upon leaving but adopt an insular mentality and resort to national stereotypes some of the benign xenophobic impulses (literally I mean fear of strangeness) might drive the UK towards a protectionist bubble.

    There is a minority that isn’t risk adverse, that really think it is a gamble that can pay off if the UK plays its cards right. This is the business end of the Leavers campaign and risks are a part of that business, knowing risks are a part of business. To me this minority tends to be the more educated, more calculated, and to some extent the least influential socially. However they for the most part have no answers for what a Brexit UK looks like.
    Some are even quite cynical, wanting to leave the EU to escape Human rights legislation or environmental legislation trying to profit from the freedom of exploitation and pollution.

    I don’t know what the UK offers outside the EU in terms of bilateral trade, in the past it’s not be so simple to have trade deals lopsided and the Opium Wars and Boston Tea Party are great examples of the U.K. being able to determine “its trade with the world”. The U.K. Key strength in my opinion is the large number of willing partners from the US, the Commonwealth, in Europe and beyond without favouritism.

    When it comes to India and China, there isn’t a strong consensus on what these countries actually want from a UK that doesn’t make stuff anymore, particularly stuff that isn’t reliant on a pan European subvention or supply chain. There’s very little enthusiasm about developing language skills or cultural awareness of these countries and their regions.

    This is a major cultural shift, and ther’s very little clarity about what exactly the UK’s economic competive advantage would be globally, it used to be the financial sector but it, like Switzerland is being forced to move away from that. Europe is a big block that can compete with the USAs, China’s and India. Africa and Asia have their own economic unions. The Harking back to Empire mentality is doing nothing to recreate it.

  • Hugh Davison

    Yes exactly. But I can see the appeal of being surrounded by a cosy little fence, keeping those Irish natives out. When did common sense ever infect Northern politics?

  • MacTurk

    Britain is NOT making trade deals with China, at least not in the sense of binding Free Trade Agreements, because that power is reserved to the EU.

    In the event of a Brixit, the chances of China being remotely interested in negotiating a FTA with the UK(whatever shape that is in) range from slim to ‘Couldn’t be bothered’…..

    While Germany, The Netherlands, and RoI trade with the world, the UK has shown no signs, over the last 45 odd years that it would suddenly metamorphose into a master of the export markets.

    In any case, Britain’s main exports are services, and a Brixit would automatically cut it off from its largest services market.

  • Kevin Breslin

    Well I’m sure Chinese are buying German cars and French food, and the Europeans are making made in China, but why surrender a panacea?

  • Kevin Breslin

    Irish nationalism and republicanism was driven by pro-European Protestants.