Sinn Fein on sex abuse: “We cannot allow anyone to use ignorance as an excuse for their failure to report”

I see Jude is with Francie Molloy [0.9] in his disapproval of Paudie McGahan’s testimony on Tuesday’s Spotlight programme. But it’s worth sharing Elaine Byrne’s perspective (Author of Political Corruption in Ireland) from the night of the broadcast:

[Can’t find a six]

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  • Ulick

    Except as Arthur Morgan’s letter which was released yesterday proves, Paudie McGahan was clearly and unambiguously advised by Sinn Féin representatives to report the abuse to the proper authorities in the police. Neither Spotlight nor Elaine Byrne seem to have reported this most basic of facts.

  • chrisjones2

    In the Irish Republic SF and their associates conspired to pervert the course of justice, offered to murder the alleged culprit, failed to report to the Garda the most heinous of crimes and smuggled the alleged culprit away to safety where he presumably has been free to rape again.

    Does any belive that , control freak that he is, the boul Gerry knew nothing of all this?

    Has SF no respect at all for the rule of law in the Irish Republic whose 100th anniversary they keep trying to hijack?

    Is this what voters in Ireland want?

  • chrisjones2

    like that SF’s representatives offered to put a bullet in the back of the head of the alleged culprit and disappear him? And all this post GFA?

  • Ulick

    As I said, he was clearly and unambiguously advised to go to the police. That fact that neither you, Mick or others on this site can bring themselves to acknowledge even the most basic of facts in this case tells it’s own story about the agendas at play here.

  • Jag

    Post GFA but pre acceptance of PSNI/RUC,

  • mickfealty

    That falls way short of the standards laid out for the Church by Sinn Fein.

    So here’s an Occam’s razor: why would someone like Deputy Arthur Morgan frisk the alleged victim?

  • Jag

    How many victims of clerical sex abuse were given the power to determine the punishment for their abuser?

    IRA didn’t do incarceration. It was killing, beating or expulsion. IRA had no control over expulsion once it wound down operations, and the alleged abuser returned to Louth in late 2000s which apparently triggered alleged victim’s decision to go public. IRA couldn’t guarantee lifetime expulsion.

  • Granni Trixie

    For the first time I visited Jude Collins blog and was quite shocked at the lack of compassion in the tone towards an obviously traumatised victim. He even went down the road of what about Kincora,the churches,the whole population – in other words ‘sure everybody’s doing it’.

    I ought not to have been shocked for Jude has form which is probably why his blog seems largely to be a gathering point for people who share his view ie state all wrong, Republicans all right.

    So, yet another pattern in SF response when a scandal emerges: Adams and co in public put on their anguished face whilst giving the nod to others behind the scenes on the Internet to go gung ho in undermining the veracity of the victim.

    Btw,I do not say allegedly for the speakng truth to power of Paudie speaks for itself and no amount of throwing mud at Spotlight can obscure this

  • chrisjones2

    When did it wind down operations?

    Dont believe what you are told

  • chrisjones2

    this happened in Ireland. Was it pre acceptance of An Garda Siochana?

  • chrisjones2

    …because they treated him like a suspect

    Is the bigger question not why were SF representatives allegedly a party IN THE REPUBLIC to an offer to murder a suspect rather than have him dealt with according to low and with due proicess

  • mickfealty

    That’s neither a wise nor an equitable comparison Jag. The Church used its moral authority to bully and cajole victims into abeyance. But the resulting punishments look remarkably similar.

  • willie drennan

    Jude Collins says, “4. Is there a danger of selective moral indignation here? It’s clear that interviewers and commentators find the McGahon case disturbing. If what Mr McGahon says is true then they have every right to be disturbed. But aren’t there a whole series of cases, Kincora being perhaps the most notorious, which have received rather less consistent attention by the media? If the answer to this is yes, it doesn’t take an Einstein to work out why Mr McGahon’s case has been singled out for attention.”

    Fair enough, it’s not just Sinn Fein and their military wing who abuse power. Where there is power it seems inevitable that there will be abuse of power and scale of abuse of power seems directly related to scale of power. Are we about to find out just how powerful and controlling the IRA and their political wing have been?

    There can be no dispute that the BBC Spotlight television documentaries on Mairia Cahill and Paudie McGahon have been a revelation and a testimony to the powerful influence of professional investigative journalism on television. Or, as some would say, including Francie Molloy, ” trial by television”.

    Jude Collins reckons that you don’t need to be an Einstein to figure out why some cases are being singled out. But another question is, why now? Why now have the Spotlight team been allowed to reveal the detail of these disturbing cases? Why now when, to date,a huge swathe of IRA atrocity and abuse of power has been swept under the carpet to save the ‘peace process’? Is it somehow related to Sinn Fein’s expected political gains in ROI? Is it related to the prospect of Sinn Fein having a significant role in the next Irish government.? Has someone decided that that would be a step too far?

  • Ulick

    Nonsense Mick. Those links from Elaine Byrne are from speeches made circa 2012.

    This man was abused at the height on the conflict in 1992 before the IRA. He reported it to the IRA in 2002 and later refused their offer to punish the man. After the IRA disbanded and Sinn Féin signed-up to policing 2005-07, he was advised to take go to the police and seek help. Instead of doing so he approached Suzanne Breen of the Sunday Tribune and later BBCNI Spotlight programme.

    What is clear here, is that the IRA acted when the abuse was reported to them by McGahan – presumably this is why he approached them in the first place! McGahan was latter supplied with advice IN WRITING that the police should be informed and he should seek help. That letter is clear indication to everyone, even before the speeches in Elaine Byrne’s links, that Sinn Féin believe the proper authorities to investigate these matter are the police and McGahan has their full support.

    That he choose to ignore the advice and go to Breen and O’Leary instead is a matter for him.

  • chrisjones2

    I do acknowledge the facts.

    I acknowledge that there was a PIRA / SF cover up, that an abuser was feed to potentially abuse again and spirited away, that there was an offer to murder a person in the Republic of Ireland at a time when the IRA was alleged to have ‘gone away’ and that it is alleged that SF members were parties to that.

    Are you happy to acknowledge all that?

    And can you explain why you seem to feel the need to act as an apologist for this or divert attention from these issues?

    I respect the right of anyone to be a Republican and fight politically for that end and for a United Ireland. This is not Republicanism. This is sheer gangsterism

  • mickfealty

    You’re evading Ulick. The significance of the statements is that that they are all reasonable expectations of how any organisation should deal with the corruption of minors within its own ranks.

    They are not exaggerated or abnormally high standards. And they do not include reference to ‘proper authorities’. The intention – rightly in my view – was to place responsibility upon the leadership of the Church.

    And in Diarmuid Martin the church appears to have found a committed and eloquent leader in this regard. In contrast, SF are trying to pretend that none of this applies to them.

  • Jag

    That’s a difficult one. Firstly, the alleged perpetrator is reportedly Northern Irish, so if he were to be apprehended, chances were he was going to be apprehended by the PSNI/RUC, which SF did not support before what is a grey period but generally held to be 2005-2007.

    Secondly, there was also a mistrust – to a far lesser extent than towards the RUC – on the part of SF towards the Gardai. That too has changed, but it would also have been the mid 2000s when that change occurred.

  • Jag

    These things are never going to be black and white in the aftermath of a civil war with what was a messy and compromised peace treaty, and it depends on what you characterise as operations, but I would have said mid 2000s. That’s pretty much in line with the view of the peace oversight bodies also.

  • Jag

    Don’t follow you Mick. I was referring to the punishment of offenders. Firstly the Church used to stonewall complainants, refusing to believe them, and at best, they’d move the offender to a different parish, generally in another part of the same country.

    Both the Mairia Cahill and this latest case show the complainants were believed, they were given options as to the punishment of alleged perpetrators, and in the two cases we know about, the alleged offenders were moved at the behest of the alleged victims, who could have demanded more severe punishment.

  • Jag

    Rubbish, in this latest instance, the IRA seems to have acted pretty damned quick when the alleged victim alerted the IRA in 2002. It was hardly a “Kangaroo Court”, more of a meeting to understand what had happened. IRA doesn’t do incarceration, so options were capital or corporal punishment or exile, and the victim got to make the choice.

    If you were looking for a fourth option, incarceration, in what was the immediate aftermath of a civil war with a messy peace treaty, and the suspect was an IRA volunteer, that option was never going to be made available by the IRA for obvious reasons.

    And after the peace process bedded down in the mid 2000s and policing was embraced by SF, the advice given by SF to alleged victims was to go to the police.

    Can’t see anything wrong with any of that, but then again, I regard the term “Troubles” as a deliberate attempt to downplay what was a full-blown and particularly nasty civil war.

  • mickfealty

    Okay, don’t take this as rude or intemperate Jag, but ‘what punishment’?

    Now it may be that this has been offered to others in the past, and accordingly we are unlikely to hear from any victims who said yes to the offer since they would be complicit in the murder. A very efficient way to erasing traces of the abuser, the abuser and giving the abusee motive never to tell.

    That said, in this case, and you have think in most cases the vulnerable young person is unlikely to have freely chosen murder as commensurate punishment for sexual abuse.

    So in purely instrumental terms, I see the set up McGahan describes as an effective Hobson’s choice leaving the IRA free to act in the way the Church did. Other cases may or may not emerge that adds to that perception or takes away from it.

  • Ulick

    Well in this case Mick, “the Church” has disbanded but you seem to want to hold other organisations responsible. Kind of like holding SSVP or PTAA responsible for Brendan Smyth. Logically it doesn’t wash and the more you try to make it stick, the more it obvious it becomes that you and others are using these victims to desperately push propaganda.

    Fortunately the agenda is transparent as evidenced by the response on Newstalk this morning after Ivan Yates and his sidekick used this to go on an anti-GA & SF tirade.

  • Glenn Clare

    Could it be that because they are now on the cousp of power that their past can’t or should that be must not be covered over, hidden or white washed out. If they want to play in the big league then they are going to have to accept the hard tackles. Why should people accept that their past is hidden why should they be held to a lesser degree of scrutiny just because they are Sinn Fein / IRA.

  • Jag

    What punishment, Mick? In the IRA’s case, it was capital or corporal punishment or exile.

    ” in this case, and you have think in most cases the vulnerable young person is unlikely to have freely chosen murder as commensurate punishment for sexual abuse.”

    really Mick? Judging by the experiences of other jurisdictions which use capital punishment, and the support by victims for capital punishment, as evidenced by their attendance at executions, I think you’re wrong.

  • mickfealty

    Well, I’m open to disproof Jag. But I’m going on the lengths they went to in this case to game the victim into the choice he made.

    As mentioned above, I’m saying that those who chose a killing (if any did) will likely never be heard of. But what cannot be gainsaid is that the outcomes we know of look remarkably similar.

  • mickfealty

    Sex abuse was not part of Weston Park or any other agreement Jag.

  • mickfealty

    You’ll be saying next that Gerry’s not still Pope.

  • willie drennan

    “..why should they be held to a lesser degree of scrutiny just because they are Sinn Fein / IRA.”

    I think in ROI they have not been afforded a lesser degree of scrutiny while in Northern Ireland they clearly have. The fact that these Spotlight programmes have come through BBC Northern Ireland suggests that government goal posts could be changing here as well. If so we can expect more public revelations and drastic changes to our local political scene. We also need to take on board the growing relationship between British and Irish establishments.

  • Robin Keogh

    There is indeed something very disturbing about all of this in the sense that nobody seems to be giving any consideration to the social situation of Paudie and his immediate family at the the time he initially reported the matter. It would appear from what the chap said himself that he and his family were very staunch Republicans with pretty close ties to members of the IRA. The culture within the Republican family at the time was still very much a closed shop. Despite the GFA, the policing Issue and decommissioning was far from resolved so there was still very much an element of self policing within the community. Paudie said he was scared when going to the meeting with the IRA along with the other lad. This does not make sense, firstly because he had grown up his entire life amongst the IRA apparently so he would have known a lot of them – he said himself some of them where his friends – and secondly he brought his girlfriend with him. I doubt any fella would bring his missus into what he genuinely believed was a dangerous situation. Moreover, in the interview, the journalist from Independent News and Media stated he had been working with Paudie for 6 or 4 years (cant remember which). What was he working with him on for such a long time? And did this journalist give details of Paudie’s attack to the gaurds or the PSNI? I personally feel that when somebody claims they were raped that person should be believed and I do believe Paudie. However, I am baffled as to how such a serious attack was first presented through the media before an investigation could be completed by the authorities? That’s hardly normal procedure is it? Also, the grounds on which SF are being accuse of a cover up are at best flimsy. When he first reported the attack it was investigated by the organisation that was part of his own traditional family social fabric. He chose to go to republicans with his claims. When he spoke to Arthur Morgan after the process had bedded down and policing and weapons were dealt with he was advised to go to the authorities. In fact the only stumbling block for the Shinners here is that a counsellor (apparently) failed to advise him to report his attack to the Gardai. Hardly grounds for full scale attack on SF. But I doubt that will matter to the machines standing behind both Mairia and Paudie.

  • james

    Gently kicking away at the sand beneath a victims feet? How very noble of you, Robin. What you’ve written here, in essence, is a gradual attempt to discredit the victim’s version of events. It doesn’t make sense in your eyes that he was scared going in to the meeting?? Come on……after all, the IRA were an organization that routinely tortured and murdered Catholics who dared challenge them, and one of whom had raped him. Yes, I can see your confusion that he was afraid alright…you ought to be ashamed as a man to write such belittling nonsense about a man who, like yourself, blindly supported such people.

  • james

    Sssshhh….under the terms of the GFA we aren’t allowed to mention that any more.

  • Glenn Clare

    I beg to differ, the Sinn Fein/IRA disappeared and buried people
    all over the south. Sinn Fein/IRA got a free ride to give information without
    risk of arrest, to find those who Sinn Fein/IRA murdered and disappeared.

    When does society stop giving Sinn Fein/IRA a fools pardon and demand that they
    hold their hands up to their past, as a price for them being in the government in
    the republic.

    When does the peace process stop and peace begin?

  • Robin Keogh

    James get off your high horse there man. It is perfectly acceptable to question the account of events given that it was presented to us via the media screen rather than through the courts which is normally the case. I simply wondered why as a young man he would have brought his girlfriend into a situation he believed to be highly dangerous, i know i wouldnt have. Last time i checked we had a procedure in this country for dealing with such things, or is it a case that we dispense with such due process when there is a chance SF can be brought into the frame? Which is really what all this is about at the end of the day. Paudie will have to face hard question from the defence when he goes to court. I suppose u think the defense team in doing their job will also be discrediting and belittling him….. get real. Its a two way street. we cant live in a place where we simply make an accusation and its taken as Gospel – no questions asked. Is that justice? Is that democracy?

  • chrisjones2

    This all happened in Ireland. Your argument is nonsense

  • chrisjones2

    Nonsense. The crimes were committed in Ireland., The PSNI had no jurisdiction to prosecute them. This is sophistry to avoid the issue…SF covered up terrible serious crimes in Ireland.

    Why are you in such denial. You need to recognize that the people you are supporting deny every right guaranteed by the Irish Constitution they were supposedly fighting for

  • chrisjones2

    …or where the ‘decommissioned’ gun was coming from

  • chrisjones2

    perhaps his dog is?

    Is it still on the old trampoline thing this week? And has he got a licence for it?

  • willie drennan

    Point taken. In the past, with the IRA, there was clearly a blind eye turned to their activities during the troubles by the Irish establishment. In recent times though the Irish media, in particular the Sunday Independent, have been exposing Sinn Fein and the IRA relentlessly. For instance during the presidential election the past of Martin McGuinness was exposed in a way that no northern journalist has dared to date.

    Regardless of what exactly the situation has been in the past there now seems, perhaps, to be a concerted effort by both British and Irish establishments to expose Sinn Fein. Only time will tell for sure if this indeed the case.

  • Guest

    “Well, I’m open to disproof Jag.”

    It’s endearing that you think that.

  • Guest

    He’s quite dodgy on sexual abuse as well as abortion issues. Not the first time I’ve heard similar spoutings from him & his generation. Still dismaying.

  • Niall Noígíallach

    “Your argument is nonsense”

    Spoken by James Carville himself no less. We all know your well thought out, engaging and insightful debating skills are littered all over Slugger Chris. I like the ones where you really put the meat on the bones and get into detail with your points. They are the best

  • Ulick

    Who’s evading now?

  • Barneyt

    I see what you are saying Mick, but two things are gnawing at me.
    1. I perhaps think you are over-thinking this one and drawing a parallel that does not entirely hold up

    2. My gut response appreciates the point Jag is making.

    In a much more simple way, there is a great deal of difference in the way both organisations (potentially) dealt with the matter, in respect of the attacker. The victim again potentially has more chance of closure using the more brutal method, but I can see this will not suit all. At a gut level, I agree many victims would take up an offer to “off” such an attacker.

    Your comparison is valid, balanced and intellectually driven (hence my point above), but this is base animal reaction we are talking about. I believe society will look back towards the IRA and the Church with very different colours. The actions of the IRA will be regarded as a shade of grey and those of the Church….a much darker black.

  • mickfealty

    Thanks Barney. Much appreciated. This subject stirs deep emotions all round. Its not easy to deal with diplomatically.

    I think we can look ahead, even though the church is still struggling through their mess, and see some light at the end of the tunnel.

    What’s really common in both cases is the darkness which surrounds the issue. And indeed so long as we don’t know about it, there is not much we can do about it as a society. [Let’s sidebar but not forget thta issues like Kincora hint at a much wider problem here]

    However if people like Paudie do have the courage to come forward what we then choose to do or choose not to do reflects on how we train our future selves, again, as a society.

  • mickfealty

    Just trading in analogies. The ‘church’ under scrutiny here very much has not gone away.

  • james

    Erm…no, I think what it is really about is justice for the victim(s), and an important investigation into whether or not prominent members of a political party were engaged in cover ups, intimidation of witnesses and offers to commit murder.

  • Barneyt

    The church has a mess to deal with. The IRA (as they exist) needs to resolve many matters too, disappeared etc… and help bring closure. This is however no longer an Irish or Catholic church problem, but seemingly a large institutional organisation problem. Any organisation that influenced masses of people and in particular (ironically) provided or overlapped with the “care” industry may now be suspect. I doubt it has religious, political or geographical boundaries.

  • Robin Keogh

    The only prominent member of any political party mentioned in this case is Arthur Morgan, who as spotlight conveniently left out – advised Paudie verbally and in writing to go to the Authorities, and offerred to assist him In doing so. The sticky bit in all of this is the meeting Paudie attended with the IRA back in 2002. What role if any did SF play at this meeting. And who was present? Apart from that guy Padraig who were the other individuals? And what was that meeting about? Was it convened to assist him or terrorise him? Its clear the event was suppossed to help him. Whether u agree with the methods of how republicans dealt with their housework is an entirely different issue. If justice is what this is about then surely the correct course of action would be to bring Paudie’s attacker to book, rather than trying to generate a connection where clearly none exists.

  • Robin Keogh

    Mick even if it falls way short, it scuppers any notion that Arthur Morgan was trying to cover anything up. It proves beyond doubt that SF in the form of Arthur Morgan was ready willing and able to assist Paudie in apprehending his abuser through the police and the justice system. Despite the fact that they would have been aware of the debacle in Louth back in 2002. Why would SF offer to help Paudie in 2009 knowing full well that the events of 2002 would become public knowledge, if their really was a cover up. Paudie told Arthur he did not want to go to the gaurds. Full stop. Are u suggesting that Art should have blatantly ignored Paudie? How is that respect for victims?

  • aber1991

    Mr Fealty
    What do YOU think the IRA should have done with the sex offenders?

  • chrisjones2

    It is nonsense. The line is that PIRA couldn’t report it to the RUC but as we understand it the rapes all took place in the Republic. So the RUC had no locus. It was the Garda. So why not report it to the Irish state authorities where it happened.

    its a desperate nonsense threadbare excuse to try and sweep away inaction on a shameful terrible crime.

    Satisfied now?

    PS who is Carville?

  • Granni Trixie

    Surely this TopGun Republican Pierce somebody was more significant in the story than Arthur Morgan? Isn’t it significant that he seems to be keeping his head down?
    Put it another way – wouldn’t it be normal to threaten to sue Paudie if you were denying the part Paudie said you played in his treatment involving the Ira?

  • mickfealty

    See my latest for the public protection duty which is incumbent upon all public representatives.

    It’s really not necessary for all who encounter this problem to take the view that the IRA was at liberty to butcher paedophiles.

  • mickfealty

    Well, he’s calling the victim a liar. That’s an indication of something rather serious that’s not properly being owned up to by the former Teachta Dala.

  • mickfealty

    It was and still is the Church’s problem. It’s not simply a matter of owning historic abuse, it’s about cleaning out the stables to try to make sure it doesn’t happen in future.

    You cannot deal with it by spreading the responsibility so wide that it becomes no one’s fault because it is everybody’s fault.

  • mickfealty

    Look him up Chris. Take the criticism in the gentle witty way it was offered. Check whether you can get away with not making the comment before you hit the post button.

    Quality, not quantity please? 🙂

  • Robin Keogh

    What ? Where did he call him a liar?

  • chrisjones2

    Apologies !!!

  • chrisjones2

    I don’t think Government Goal Posts are changing. The Brits concern is to help SF keep stable and thriving to keep the republican sheep in the field.

    The BBC is doing what journalists do …and there are such rich pickings to be had.

    SF weren’t complaining a few weeks back when the BBC was gutting DUP expenses – mind you they had their own problems then too SF don’t complain when the BBC are exposing collusion with loyalists

    Republicanism squeals its demands for truth and justice on the past. Now when its time for some truth about its own dirty sordid little secrets it simply doesn’t like the outcome

  • chrisjones2

    I disagree. The Brits dont want that at all. They have invested 30 years in building SF up….serious damage to SF is the last thing London wants …its just too useful to them. The Irish have gone along with this for years but now SF are a threat in Ireland things are changing

  • chrisjones2

    “Firstly the Church used to stonewall complainants, refusing to believe them, and at best, they’d move the offender to a different parish, generally in another part of the same country.”

    Was Liam |Adams daughter believed? No she wasnt

  • chrisjones2

    “the alleged perpetrator is reportedly Northern Irish”

    …so now you deny him his chosen Irish citizenship? Are there no depths people wont go to to discredit the victim?

  • chrisjones2

    PS is it me or has Mary Lou seemed missing in all this?

  • mickfealty

    Paudie says that Arthur told him about the alleged abuser’s return. Arthur says it was the other way round. Isn’t that accusing the victim of lying? If not, what is it?

  • Robin Keogh

    Could it be confusion on one of their parts? With the passage of time could it be a mix up on the sequence of event? According to the Irish times today… it was Paudie who approached arthur after he had spotted his abuser at a football match? The fact that we are getting bogged down in who said what when and where is proof enough that the spotlight propaganda soap opera is no replacement for the proper course of action that this crises deserved. While Mairia was clearly a force of her own,its not beyond the bounds of possibility that paudie was coached to within an inch of his life, with what appears to be years of communication with elements of the media. And what hope does that lad have now? Any savvy legal brain could navigate his abuser away from choppy water off the back of this latest media frenzy. All in the name of damaging the political geography of the country. Its beyond shameful.

  • willie drennan

    I would have agreed with you 100% up until these Spotlight programmes. For sure this has been the strategy of British Gov which explains why so much has been swept under the carpet and why BBC have not been in a position to expose too much that would be seriously damaging to SF to date. But these revelations surely are seriously damaging for SF?.

    The other side of the coin is that Westminster is also dependent on strong links with Dublin and SF seem to be on the verge of being in a position to cause havoc for that political relationship.

    I accept that I might be reading too much into this. Only time will tell.

  • mickfealty

    Yes, almost certainly there is a confusion. It may have been a re-coding or confusion on the part of the victim. But one of the observed clinical effects of trauma is a pinpoint clear recall and memory of the events around the events themselves.

    How people stack them may be unique and only one version of many possible versions of the actual truth. But it’s not clear how he would or could have mistaken a fairly central detail like who told whom.

    It is much easier to see why Arthur might have a motive for denying Paudie’s whole account of that episode, since he was Teachta Dala for Louth at the time with a public burden of care to anyone in Paudie’s position.

    It’s also worth pointing out that we have passed the third sniper’s bullet and as such we have three cases to compare and contrast: Aine Tyrell; Mairia Cahill and now Paudie McGahon. On each occasion SF have had to shift backwards and admit things later they at first denied.

    This is a classic example:

    https://youtu.be/t7T2W2j-yO4

  • Robin Keogh

    Oh trust me when i tell you that i sadly know what that trauma is like but in terms of paudie’s meeting with Art, this occured years later. In any event when Art offerred to accompany him to the gaurds, was he not fulfilling his civic duty. Another element to this is that we are judgeing the words and behaviour of both men in the cold. I would be intereted to know if Art and paudie were friends or indeed if Art was close to the famly…and what of Paudies family… what did they know about it, if anything and how closely connected were they to the IRA. There is so much to all of this that is so intangible but i thought vincent browne tonight was quite good in trying to even up the score vis a vis the attitude of FF and FG. There is far too much pokitics at stake here for SF and a huge opportunity for their opponents to capitalise on their difficulties. In that type of environment there leaves little space for victims.

  • mickfealty

    Good night…

  • Robin Keogh

    Glenn, all of that is supposed to be part of a tripartite agreement whereby all combatants fess up and account for their behaviour. I understand the focus on SF given its surge in support but that doesnt change the necessity to have an all inclusive peace and reconciliation process.

  • Robin Keogh

    Sleep well x

  • barnshee

    “the IRA seems to have acted pretty damned quick

    I thought the iRA had gone away?