Art of the Troubles at the Ulster Museum

The Ulster Museum’s Art of the Troubles exhibition is now open and runs through the summer until 7 September.

Ulster Museum Art of the TroublesA variety of styles, “sides” and periods exhibited: sixty works from fifty artists.

Reactions to atrocities, depictions of politics (a particularly grim triptych by Joseph McWilliams of Sammy Wilson, Ian Paisley Snr and Peter Robinson) and peace talks, as well as reflections on how society dealt with conflict.

The no photography rule was being strictly imposed in the gallery this afternoon, but you can catch a glimpse of some of the works in Chris Harrison’s earlier Vine, on BBC News NI and on the News Letter website.

And you can listen to Phillip Napier’s droning artwork too.

A thoughtful exhibition of artwork that somehow we didn’t see enough of during the Troubles that’s well worth a visit if you’re up in Belfast with half an hour to spare.

This major new exhibition brings together the work of 50 artists from Northern Ireland and beyond including Joe McWilliams, Willie Doherty, FE McWilliam, Rita Duffy, Paul Seawright, Jack Pakenham, Micheal Farrell and Richard Hamilton. The exhibition features a broad representation of artists’ responses to the Troubles.

Art of the Troubles offers avenues for exploring the way in which the Troubles have been viewed by a range of artists and for reflecting on the manifestations and impact of violence and division in our society. The exhibition comprises 60 works, including paintings, drawings, photographs, videos and sculpture. It explores a broad range of themes including violence and destruction, suffering and loss, traditions and life in the midst of turmoil.

The exhibition has been developed in partnership with Wolverhampton Art Gallery and includes many works from the collections of National Museums Northern Ireland and the recently gifted Arts Council of Northern Ireland Collection. Also incorporated are loans from the Imperial War Museum’s Northern Ireland Collection, the Irish Museum of Modern Art and the Dublin City Gallery the Hugh Lane, as well as works from private collections and artists themselves.

Alan Meban. Normally to be found blogging over at Alan in Belfast where you’ll find an irregular set of postings, weaving an intricate pattern around a diverse set of subjects. Comment on cinema, books, technology and the occasional rant about life. On Slugger, the posts will mainly be about political events and processes. Tweets as @alaninbelfast.