Local Political Reaction to EU Crisis Summit Outcome

How have our local political parties reacted to the outcome of the EU crisis summit?

Well, neither the Green Party nor the Alliance Party appear to have noticed…

The “Conservative and Unionist” MEP, Jim Nicholson, has, unsurprisingly, “welcomed the use of the British veto over a new EU-wide treaty by Prime Minister David Cameron”.

“David Cameron was correct in effectively vetoing a new treaty and keeping the United Kingdom out of this new economic accord agreed at the EU emergency summit, just as the UK was right not to join the Euro in the first place.”

The SDLP’s Margaret Ritchie, MP, says “Cameron’s Europe Walk-Out Disastrous for EU Relations“.

“We in the SDLP are proud supporters of the EU, though we do recognise that the citizens of the North must be protected, financially and otherwise, from the upset in the Eurozone.

“However, this move by the Prime Minister can only serve to harm our relationship with the EU and create a two-speed, two-tier Europe with those on the inside of the stabilisation deal sorting out the mess, and those on the outside, looking on.”

The DUP don’t appear to have commented on the outcome, but prior to the EU crisis summit DUP Deputy Leader, Nigel Dodds, MP, was calling for a referendum “on those changes which are currently being brought forward by Europe”.

[No doubt they welcome Cameron’s veto, too? – Ed]  No doubt…

The TUV leader, Jim Allister, MLA, wants the Prime Minister to go further

“As I previously observed every EU crisis is turned to advance the cause of ever closer political and economic union. This is exactly what we see in the latest Brussels deal where the Eurozone countries will be more subservient than ever to the Brussels dictat. Even their domestic budgets will now have to be approved by unelected commissioners. Happily the UK is outside this inner noose but the two tier Europe which is now emerging will damage our national interests even more and confirms me in the view that the United Kingdom would be better off out of the EU.”

And, finally, the Sinn Féin president, Gerry Adams, TD, still wants a referendum – in Ireland.  And his concerns echo those of the TUV…

“The Taoiseach’s refusal to bring these proposals before the Dáil for debate is bad enough but to deny the people their say would be a betrayal.

“By agreeing to pursue tighter integration with stricter budget rules for the single currency area Enda Kenny is not representing the best interest of the Irish people.

“This deal means ordinary citizens will continue paying for the banking crisis. There was no agreement to increase the EU’s bailout fund but the burning of bondholders is forbidden.

“The consequences of this deal for Ireland are severe. Power will be transferred from elected politicians in the Dáil to judges and Eurocrats in Luxembourg and Brussels.”

[Presumably the northern wing of Sinn Féin welcomes the UK government’s refusal to sign up to ‘this deal’, then? – Ed]  You might very well think that…

Adds  As the BBC reports, it’s become a topic for debate in the Asembly.

The SDLP’s Margaret Ritchie accused David Cameron of being disrespectful towards the devolved regions, whilst the Alliance Party’s Chris Lyttle shared her concerns about what he called the “hasty” use of the veto.

However, the DUP’s Gregory Campbell and Ulster Unionist leader Tom Elliott backed the prime minister, while TUV leader Jim Allister said it was refreshing to see Mr Cameron say no to Europe.

Sinn Fein’s Mitchel McLaughlin also feared the loss of national sovereignty, but refused to join what he called the “obsequious endorsement” of Mr Cameron by the unionists.

Even though his party agrees with Cameron’s stance…   And the Green Party’s Steven Agnew has issued a statement

“Cameron’s ‘walk out’ was political grandstanding for his party and the electorate but in reality will have little impact.
“This is a bad deal for Europe and whilst the UK will not be bound by these new fiscal rules, the Eurozone is a key market for UK exports.  
“A bad deal for Europe is a bad deal for the UK and by extension Northern Ireland.

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  • Cynic2

    Yet again Margaret Ritchie wants her cake and to eat it.

    But will Gerry now launch a new campaign in the State? After all this is worse than the ’21 Treaty and look what happened then

  • DC

    Tumbleweed

  • sherdy

    Cameron has been bought and paid for by the City of London, so he is just doing his masters’ bidding. Surprise!

  • Any economists out there?

    If say Nationalists in the six counties had insisted on solely using euros ten years ago shadowing their neighbours south of the border what would have happened in the local economy.

  • Cynic2

    Articles

    Nothing. Most of them work for the State anyway and are paid in Sterling

  • Alias

    “By agreeing to pursue tighter integration with stricter budget rules for the single currency area Enda Kenny is not representing the best interest of the Irish people.” – Gerry Adams

    The problem there is that people expect that the Enda Kenny and other heads of government go to a European Council meeting to promote the national interest when, in actuality, they are constitutionally obligated to promote the collective EU interest, not the national interest. Enda Kenny must act in the best interest of the EU because that is what the constitution requires.

    The insideous aspect of the EU is that it converts the indigenous heads of government into promoters of the EU’s interests while leaving the people who elect them with the false impression that they are elected to promote the national interest at all times.

  • Cynic2

    And Sterling can be exchanged for euros.

    |If no economists out there, any fiction writers?

  • Cynic2

    Articles

    at an average cost of 2% to 3% – equivalent to say 2.5% – 3.5% on gross pay. I should have admired their political principles in taking such a stand and bearing the apin of a large pay cut. But it didnt happen

  • thethoughtfulone

    To be fair to Alliance, which admittedly is probably more than they deserve but there you go….., rather than not noticing maybe they’ve just a better grip on the realities of where Norn Iron really is.

    If the UK is hugely marginalised in the EU, and we are highly marginalised in the UK, doesn’t say much for our significance in the EU.

  • Roy Walsh

    Gerry and Jim singing from the same hymn-sheet it appears, however, slightly off point but, did anyone else notice the Cameron veto failed to permit at least 27 other european states forging ahead to achieve agreement, seems as if the veto is simply another ‘opt out’ an area where British governments have floundered before

  • Roy Walsh. Didn’t you mean, ‘failed to prevent’…..?

  • FuturePhysicist

    SDLP are towing the Labour(s) Line, UUP towing the Tory line, Sinn Féin basically GUE/NGL protesting position, DUP and TUV lining up with their friends in UKIP … Green Party more concerned with what’s going on in Durban … nothing really surprising from any of the local politicos … except perhaps Alliance to some.

    After all which sister party would Alliance back up, their long lost sisters in the Lib Dems or their half sister in Fianna Fáil?

    hmm.

  • Comrade Stalin

    SDLP are towing the Labour(s) Line

    Labour’s line is rather difficult to discern.

    After all which sister party would Alliance back up, their long lost sisters in the Lib Dems or their half sister in Fianna Fáil?

    I’d say the Alliance position is probably substantially the same as the Lib Dem position, at least among most of the leadership. Which is that what happened last Thursday was a disaster.

    But here, are you seriously an SDLP supporter suggesting that Alliance might be cosying up to Fianna Fáil ? I mean you are aware that your party was, for some time, seriously talking about a merger ?

  • Mary Anna

    Really glad the David D pull out. That will clear our Irish debt I never liked the man anyway- millionaire David child born with golden teeth- what does he know about anything. You get what you vote for an ass hole- our gain Ireland 26 countries will thrive. Get the sinners/f out they will kill the nation to death -fascist dictators Tony Blair look a likes running around up in stormont in Armani suits- Brits ministers stormont! Never trust sociopaths! They let the hunger strikers go to there graves not knowing that they win the 5 basic demands – be careful who you vote for Ireland!SS army council lie young men die for what!

  • FuturePhysicist

    But here, are you seriously an SDLP supporter suggesting that Alliance might be cosying up to Fianna Fáil ? I mean you are aware that your party was, for some time, seriously talking about a merger ?

    Fianna Fáil, Lib Dems and Alliance are all part of the European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party, since Alliance are cross community why shouldn’t they try to take on board one of their nearest neighbouring “liberal” sister parties has to say about Europe?

    The SDLP is a PES party with British Labour and Irish Labour, and while that does put them at odds with the Irish F parties (Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael and Sinn Féin) it was always the direction the party has chosen to go.

    Hume would have sat alongside the likes of Tony Cunningham and Proinsias De Rossa, if an Alliance MEP were ever to happen they would have FF and LD either side … assuming any one of those three parties could win an MEP seat under the current circumstances.

  • Comrade Stalin

    FP, doesn’t the fact that the SDLP spent some time actively pursuing a merger with Fianna Fáil kind of skewer the theory that who sits next to who in the European Parliament has any real relevance to anything outside of that building ?

  • Comrade Stalin

    I mean, I wonder what’s going to happen next. Someone from the UUP will drop in and accuse Alliance of being pro-Tory or something.

  • Pete Baker

    Adds As the BBC reports, it’s become a topic for debate in the Asembly.

    The SDLP’s Margaret Ritchie accused David Cameron of being disrespectful towards the devolved regions, whilst the Alliance Party’s Chris Lyttle shared her concerns about what he called the “hasty” use of the veto.

    However, the DUP’s Gregory Campbell and Ulster Unionist leader Tom Elliott backed the prime minister, while TUV leader Jim Allister said it was refreshing to see Mr Cameron say no to Europe.

    Sinn Fein’s Mitchel McLaughlin also feared the loss of national sovereignty, but refused to join what he called the “obsequious endorsement” of Mr Cameron by the unionists.

    Even though his party agrees with Cameron’s stance… And the Green Party’s Steven Agnew has issued a statement

    “Cameron’s ‘walk out’ was political grandstanding for his party and the electorate but in reality will have little impact.
    “This is a bad deal for Europe and whilst the UK will not be bound by these new fiscal rules, the Eurozone is a key market for UK exports.
    “A bad deal for Europe is a bad deal for the UK and by extension Northern Ireland.
  • Roy Walsh

    Mick, be happy, seems the leader of the main British opposition reads your site

  • Sluggerposter

    Get your facts right people! The Green Party made their position on the Euro Crisis clear weeks ago – http://europeangreens.eu/congress/?page_id=417

    and on Monday when the issue was raised in the Assembly a press release was issued: http://greenpartyni.co.uk/breaking-news/