News Letter interview with Eric Glass

Eric Glass has been a bit of a quiet hero to Fermanagh unionists for years. Like a number of such people they have said little publicly about what happened to them during the IRA’s terrorist campaign. Now, however, Eric has spoken to the News Letter about his remarkable story of courage.

Eric Glass was a corporal in the UDR and also worked for Fermanagh District Council and was for quite some time the dog warden. In 1978 he was driving a council van full of workmen through Garrison. The van was attacked without warning by IRA terrorists. Eric was hit in the shoulder but managed to drive the vehicle past the ambush. Sadly one of his colleagues was killed and another seriously injured. Eric was awarded the Queen’s Gallantry medal for his actions that day.

Mr. Glass had already had his home attacked in 1972.

However, the most memorable event occurred on 5th February 1992. From the Newsletter:

He was taking his morning tea break when his secretary took a telephone call giving directions to the scene of an alleged dog attack.
“I asked her if the call was for me and she said it was so I spoke to him,” Eric said.
The voice belonged to an IRA gunman — one of a four-man gang staging a carefully planned ambush at a border farmhouse near Belleek.
“He didn’t sound nervous or anything. He just said his niece was down at the weekend and the wee dog had bit her on the face.
“Then he said ‘I don’t know what to do about it’ and kept asking me what time I would be down.”
The heavily armed gunmen had been in the house from the morning before, keeping the householder hostage.
“As I drove down the lane to the house I had my gun [a Walther pistol] under a coat on the front seat,” Eric recalled.
“The minute I pulled up one guy came to the driver’s door — he had a gun [an automatic rifle] with binder twine on it slung round his neck — and the other one had a revolver. They came running out shouting and swearing ‘get out of the van — IRA’.
“The one with the revolver ran up to the passenger door.
“I cocked the gun and fired three shots out through the passenger side,” Eric said. The body of Joe MacManus, 21, from Sligo was later recovered from the scene.
“I swung round quick and pushed the door into the other guy. He had the rifle round his neck on the string and was going to use his hands to get me out of the van but he ran off.”
Eric took cover behind the front wheel of the van and opened fire on two further gunmen armed with Kalashnikov-type rifles behind a low wall no more than 20 metres away.
When one moved position and appeared at the side of the house, Eric took careful aim and pulled the trigger only to find he was out of ammunition.
“The magazine was empty but I had another one in my coat which was in the van.”
Eric would have to place himself in direct line of fire, running back around the open van door to retrieve his spare magazine. “I pulled out the coat, got the full mag and whacked it in to the gun.”
When the terrorists realised what was happening they closed in for the kill as Eric explained: “They ran down firing on automatic and that’s when I got the whacked on the legs.” Eric’s left leg had shattered below the knee and he was losing a lot of blood.
“With the new magazine on I fired back and somebody roared ‘two, three and four run for it’ and they disappeared into cover.
“When I shouted at the man in the house to phone for help he said he couldn’t as the boys would come back and shoot him.”
Worried he could lose consciousness before help was summoned, Eric hauled himself up on a brush shaft and made it to the phone in the hallway of the farmhouse.
“After I made the phone call [to the police] I looked out the window and saw one of them coming back up again. He went up to the boy that was shot and took his pistol.
“This was all happening maybe five or even ten minutes after it all started.
“I had only two or three rounds left at this stage and I remember thinking: ‘If he comes in for me now I’ll just lie here and let him shoot away at me.’ The adrenaline had all left the body and I couldn’t have cared less. I could see all the blood pouring out of my boots.”
The crew of a military helicopter coming to Eric’s assistance spotted the three remaining gunmen who were still at the scene.
They fled towards the border but were picked up by Garda officers and arrested.
At their subsequent trial in Dublin, Eric spent almost four full days in the witness box under cross-examination.
All three were eventually convicted and jailed for their role in the shooting.
Corporal Glass was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal — second only to the Victoria Cross — for his actions in the face of the enemy.

He was the only soldier to receive such a high honour in the 22-year-history of the Regiment.
His bravery earned him the respect and admiration of everyone connected with the UDR but, although thankful to be alive, he paid a high price for his heroism on that fateful day.
“I spent nine months in hospital because the bones in my left leg were shattered. Then when I eventually got our of hospital I found I didn’t have a job to go back to with the council. That was hard to come to terms with after all those years working there,” Eric explained.
Still reeling from the loss of his day job, the former dog warden was then paid a visit by representatives of the UDR’s personnel department.
Eric said he was “gutted” at the suggestion he would be better off leaving the Regiment.
“It took a lot out of me that day because I didn’t for one minute think I would have to leave the UDR. They were very good about it, and sympathetic OK, but it wasn’t nice to hear.
“In the end they explained everything about pensions and things like that and eventually convinced me it would be for the best.”
Welcome relief from the thought of enforced unemployment came in the form of a private audience with the Queen.
As Eric views his family as the real heroes of the story, he was delighted to have his wife with him at Buckingham Palace in 1993 for the Distinguished Conduct Medal presentation.
Despite leaving the Regiment in 1993, Eric remained a prime terrorist target and subsequently moved house to minimise the risk.
When the remaining members of the IRA gang were released from prison under the Good Friday Agreement, the police again visited the Glass family home to advise them of the need to review their personal security.
Despite his iconic status in the Regiment’s history, Eric says with typical humility, “I was fighting for my life.”
“I just happened to be an ordinary person called on to do something extraordinary at the time, but I worked with a lot of very brave men and women.”

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  • between the bridges

    Lamhdearg… have you never heard off the WELBYBDFF?

    Western education and library board yellow bus driver’s freedom fighters…

  • socaire

    Monsieur Fealty is out on the town tonight and when he comes in and reads all this frivolity and realises that posters were enjoying themselves ….. the red cards will fly like shipyard rivets at taigs.

  • qwerty12345

    Tell you what Mark, with any luck I wont be doing it again.

  • between the bridges

    socare…yeah right all proddyorangebigots are proddyorangebigots and how dare they have different views from you…

  • joeCanuck

    socaire,

    I’m beginning to think that you suspect me of being a supporter of the Stormont regime prior to the GFA.

  • between the bridges

    Q lets put this too bed now…if as you say a 12 year old child comes home after been run over by a half crazed, thi chi expert, bnp supporting, bus driver and has to take two whole days of skol.
    Said child’s parents do in your own words nothing as you the 12 year old ‘didn’t know my rights’. Well then mate the only logical conclusion is you where brought up by fermanagh’s version of the west’s (fred not harry) or maybe your telling porky pie’s? Lmao

  • socaire

    Surprisingly, yes, joe. How silly of me?

  • between the bridges

    socare do you not have a jackanory about proddyorangebigots driving over your ankles?

  • qwerty12345

    lamhdearg. Have you never heard what lord Kilclooney said about Fermanagh ( to Eamonn McCann) “You get a better class of croppie near the border”. make of that what you will

  • socaire

    … and bridges. I don’t mind people having different opinions to me just as long as they are not in a position to act their fantasies out. And I’m surprised at a man of your erudition, that you can’t differentiate between protestant, orange and unionist. Believe it or not – they are not the same. You are now, in Turgon’s company, drifting into the realms of mopery.

  • qwerty12345

    This is really boring. I take it back the bus incident never happened I lied about it all. There are yall happy now.

    So now all we have to deal with as supporters of the “UDR were wonderful” narrative is get rid of all record of those pesky sectarian murders, giving guns to loyalists and internal army reports.

    I cant believe I’ve wasted time on here today with you infantile twerps. Please report me for this post too.

  • between the bridges

    Mr. Q son of west I rest my case…

    Socare I thank you for the compliments!! I also hold you in high regard, I do feel however that you could dry your eyes as imho you do a nice turn in mopery yourself…mind the rivets!

  • socaire

    qwerty, don’t be downhearted. Accept the fact that you threw yourself under the bus and were lucky not to be prosecuted for posession of explosives and other things useful to terrorists. You got off lightly, my boy.

  • pippakin

    I don’t think acknowledging the bravery of Mr Glass is any kind of endorsement for the more thuggish element of the UDR, just as I don’t think being an Irish republican is an automatic endorsement of the IRA.

  • socaire

    You should have stopped after “I don’t think……………….”

  • lamhdearg

    lowest form of

  • socaire

    life? wit?

  • between the bridges

    My own personal experience of the UDR is quiet simple they where ordinary decent people doing a job they believed in. for those that have a different opinion I will say this if the UDR was even half as bad as you try to make out there would have been a hell of a lot bigger body count.

    cue rants….

  • socaire

    And before I leave to drown my sorrows, and at the risk of politicising the Irish language, can I make the point that Lamh (hand) isa feminine noun and consequently the adjective dearg (red) must needs be aspirated – dhearg giving lamhdhearg. Do not regard this as a criticism as I am only too happy to see you use your second language. Oíche mhaith.

  • pippakin

    socaire

    Twice on one thread you must be losing the argument…Try sticking to the subject.

  • lamhdearg

    socaire
    i have been told that before, a number of times, try putting lamhdearg into your search engine, and then spend the night telling various GAA groups they are spelling it wrong, it is their first language after all.

  • socaire

    Sorry, pi**akin, but you keep distracting me with your inane, inconsequential and holier than thou interjections.

  • pippakin

    socaire

    I was on subject and obviously on target. You’re not worth anger Oiche mhaith

  • socaire

    I would never, ever hold the GAA up as a beacon of Irish grammar. You want to see some of the howlers. I’m not a pedant – well, yes I am – but if I wasn’t sure about something then I would have an expert check it out before putting it in print. Any tear away and thank you for an evening of relatively good natured entertainment.

  • lamhdearg

    good night

  • joeCanuck

    socaire,

    You said it, not me (silly).

  • Limerick

    The bus story has rightly been ridiculed, but what inspired it? I suspect that the Provisional Internet Revisionism Army realised that they could not credibly get into a MOPEry argument re the Fermanagh UDR’s involvement in terrorism, as the sectarian murder campaign in Fermanagh was almost entirely carried out by republicans. What else therefore tugs at the heartstrings of misty eyed republicans then? Nasty Prods attacking children will do it every time.

    Hence we have an incredible story about a UDR man who drives a school bus attacking and seriously assaulting school children. Rosa Parkes eat your heart out.

    Apart from the nonsense about a bus going over an ankle and not breaking it though we must also consider the following. The bus driver in question had a job in which he turned up at the same place every day and picked up school children whose parents may have been supportive of PIRA. We are expected to believe that he was perfectly happy to further compound the danger he was in of being murdered by attacking their children.

    Nonsense of course and especially offensive given the fact that PIRA did indeed target and murder bus drivers in front of the school children they were driving. One bus driver in particular was murdered in Fermanagh as were his other two brothers. Rather than expressing shame about horror like that the nationalist posters rant about how nasty the UDR were to them.

    In the circumstances the UDR acted towards them with incredible restraint.

  • dwatch
  • Zig70

    The bus story has rightly been ridiculed – Some people on here read the story, others saw it through pearly glasses. One thing to reserve judgement, question the facts, give your different perspective, but to call someone a liar was pathetic. I’d say the percentage of readers who believed it still is higher and the attacks furthered nothing.

  • Limerick

    Zig70,

    I suppose that some people believe what they want to believe. Regardless of how fantastical it might be.

  • sonofstrongbow

    The keyboard guy with the bionic ankles flew a fantastical kite that was quickly shot down by those more discerning posters. The smouldering wreckage was poked at a little and now the smoking pilot is being portrayed as a bit of a victim. Come on! MTFU.

  • In the circumstances the UDR acted towards them with incredible restraint.

    Who is “them” in this sentence? And the UDR should not be acting with incredible restraint towards “normal” citizens but acting in a professional manner. I was stopped many times as I travelled all around the country on business and I was always treated fairly courteously.

  • Limerick

    Joe,

    “Them” would be the people who wanted to see the soldiers dead. When discussing the UDR we can only compare them to other military forces who found themselves in similar situations. The Irish army for instance. The countered terrorism by tying the terrorists they captured to their own landmines and blowing them to bits. Yet are they talked about with hate and contempt? Not a bit of it. They weren’t Prods you see.

  • antamadan

    I would differ with most of you. The UDR were the sharp end of the whole apparatus to keep the unfair status quo which for example included only unionists getting school bus driver jobs in Fermanagh (See the reputable CAIN, and find Fermanagh civil rights publications). It goes without saying of course that Glass was very brave, and the whole troubles were just appalling.

  • lamhdearg

    q12345
    also says he knew many good udr men, so maybe we should give this part of his story more credence, and let up on the muck slinging.

  • dwatch

    UDR memorial unveiled in Lisburn.

    http://www.u.tv/News/UDR-memorial-unveiled-in-Lisburn/4dfd9ec8-3497-44ac-84c2-b25c21edc7c4

    After the statue to the UDR was unveiled in Lisburn yesterday feelings are running high over the snub given to Belfast City Council who voted in favour to have a parade in Belfast for the homecoming RIR (former UDR). Looks like the UUP are not going to give up over this matter . Wonder will Liam Fox & Cameron reconsider?

    http://www.newsletter.co.uk:80/news/local/over_20_000_petition_for_rir_parade_1_2767751

  • Harry Flashman

    OK we’ve all had fun with the ankle story, the dreary debate about the school busdriver hiring policy of the WELB in the 1970’s can be saved for another day and we undoubtedly admire the heroism of Eric Glass, can we now deal with the substantive point raised by posters like qwerty?

    How do people who condemn illegal paramilitary activity and terrorism square their beliefs with the shameful record of terrorist infiltration of the UDR almost from its conception?

    Most UDR men were decent people concerned about protecting their society but among their comrades were thugs and criminals for whom the only uniform that should have been on their backs was that of Her Majesty’s Prison and not her armed forces.

    This is a very serious point and until posters are prepared to address honestly the disgraceful role of serving members of the UDR in dreadful terrorist atrocities then no amount of handwringing about a few rotten apples will do.

    You either are opposed to terrorism or you are not, terrorists wearing the uniform of the British Army in the dark country lanes of North Armagh are no less terrorists than those wearing balaclavas and anoraks in the Bogside.

    You can’t pick and choose your terrorists.

  • Limerick

    Harry,

    I haven’t seen any posters here defending UDR members who were also in terrorist organisations. Quite the opposite in fact.

  • No, Harry, we cannot pick and choose. The way to deal with terrorists who wore uniforms is to gather evidence and charge them.

  • qwerty12345

    What amuses me most about the reaction to my bus driver story was the quickness that it was seized upon to dismiss the valid points that I was making. Harry flashman hits the nail squarely on the head.

    Some twit even acused me of being an IRA apologist even after I wrote that I have known ex UDR men who id rather spend time with than fellow nationalists.

    I couldnt care less if the story isnt believed – the fact that some dont believe it doesnt mean that it isnt true. Nor does it mean that I was “shot down” it just means that there are certain parts of our past that some people just wont even countenance.

  • between the bridges

    Q it was an amusing story a little jackanory but amusing none the less…did you congratulate your mate Bert on his MBE?

  • Harry Flashman

    “I haven’t seen any posters here defending UDR members who were also in terrorist organisations. Quite the opposite in fact.”

    On the contrary Limerick, there is little or no condemnation of the terrorist infiltration of the UDR, and the amount of penetration by terrorists into a so-called anti-terrorist military unit is appalling, in this thread for the simple fact that most posters simply choose to bury their heads in the sand and pretend it never happened.

    So much easier to witter on about a bus and ankles rather than address a very serious, substantive point.

  • qwerty12345

    Bert got an MBE “For services to Local Government in Northern
    Ireland”. Good for him, Im sure he is a very hard working councillor, when he isnt making an arse of himself with sectarian gibberish in the town hall.

  • dwatch

    Harry Flashman, compared to a single UDR man Neil Latimer released under the GFA, please show me the list of names of other UDR men released under the GFA compared to all these IRA republican terrorists http://www.google.com/search?source=ig&hl=en&rlz=&q=List+of+Republican+terrorists+released+under+the+GFA&btnG=Google+Search&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=

  • dwatch

    Harry Flashman, compared to a single UDR man Neil Latimer released under the GFA, please show me the list of names of other UDR men released under the GFA compared to all these IRA republican terrorists.

    http://victims.org.uk/s08zhk/pdfs/counter/List%20of%20Irish%20terrorist%20prisoners%20released%201998.pdf

  • Harry Flashman

    ” The way to deal with terrorists who wore uniforms is to gather evidence and charge them.”

    In fairness the evidence against Privates Harris Boyle and Wesley Somerville.was relatively easy to collect as it consisted of large, badly burnt chunks of their flesh scattered all over the A1 road outside of Newry.

    It came to be there as a result of the bomb that they and fellow members of their UDR patrol were planting inside the minibus of the Miami Showband when it exploded prematurely. The remaining UDR men then slaughtered the band members.

    Somerville’s arm was identified by the “Portadown UVF” tattoo on it, just the sort of distinguishing mark even the dimmest officer in a supposedly anti-terrorist unit might have questioned do you not think?

    The killers were mostly members of the UDR, wearing UDR uniforms and using UDR weapons. Boyle’s comrades in A’ Company 9 UDR posted a message of condolence in the UVF’s house magazine. Three other serving UDR men were convicted as a result of the murders.

    Just an isolated incident? Perhaps. One of those unfortunate rogue groups that spring up in any conflict zone? Maybe.

    It could be that Corporal Robert McConnell, 2UDR and suspect in the Dublin and Monaghan bombings was an entirely innocent and upright citizen. No doubt Captain Billy Hanna, Private Norman Greenlee, Captain John Irwin, Private William Wright, Private Laurence Tate, Private William Leonard, all serving members of the UDR and all members of the so-called Glenanne gang of murderers, gunmen, bombers and robbers were in fact totally innocent of any wrongdoing but you begin to get an idea of why people might have had their doubts about the commitment of large sections of the UDR to eliminating terrorism.

    18 UDR men convicted for murder, 11 convicted for manslaughter, and heavens knows how many terrorists were persuaded to discreetly resign from the regiment before their trials. Anyone else see a picture emerging yet of a military unit that might just have a problem?

    Well, what about this statement?

    “I will not tolerate any active participation by members of this battalion in any organisation which encourages violence… you cannot play in both teams.

    Either you believe in law and order applied equally to all men, or you believe in violence as a means of achieving political ends. In this respect the UDA is no better than IRA. Not only should you take no part in UDA activities but you should discourage your fellow citizens [from doing so].”

    Those are the words of Lt Col Dion Beard, commander of 3 UDR, the very fact that he would have to make such a statement would rather indicate that he could see a bloody big problem with some of the troops in his command, but then maybe he was just some sort of Provo sympathiser.

    Well, let’s get back to the important business of ankles and buses shall we?

  • dwatch

    ‘Either you believe in law and order applied equally to all men, or you believe in violence as a means of achieving political ends’

    Sure and all these poor innocent IRA Irish Republicans all believed in law and order and look what happened to them.

    PATRICK KELLY REM Longford Belmarsh
    SEAMUS McARDLE REM Armagh Belmarsh
    BRIAN McHUGH REM Fermanagh Belmarsh
    JAMES MURPHY REM England Belmarsh
    MICHAEL PHILLIPS REM England Belmarsh
    PAT MARTIN 35 Belfast Belmarsh
    ROISIN McALISKEY REM Tyrone
    GERRY HANRATTY 35 Dublin Frankland
    NICHOLAS MULLEN 30 Sligo Frankland
    JOE O’CONNELL LIFE Clare Frankland
    LIAM O’DUIBHIR 30 Dublin Frankland
    LIAM QUINN LIFE San Francisco Frankland
    VINCENT DONNELLY LIFE Tyrone Full Sutton
    DONAL GANNON 35 Dublin Full Sutton
    PAUL MAGEE 30 Belfast Full Sutton
    EOIN MORROW 35 Louth Full Sutton
    PETER SHERRY LIFE Tyrone Full Sutton
    JOHN CRAWLEY 35 Dublin Whitemoor
    EDDIE BUTLER LIFE Limerick Whitemoor
    HUGH DOHERTY LIFE Donegal Whitemoor
    HARRY DUGGAN LIFE Clare Whitemoor
    FRANKIE RAFFERTY 35 Dublin Whitemoor
    JAN TAYLOR 30 London Whitemoor

    The Maze
    H4A
    JOHN BRADY LIFE Strabane H4A
    MARK CLEARY LIFE Belfast H4A
    TERRY CLINTON 14 The Markets H4A
    KIERAN COLLINS 10 Beechmount H4A
    CHRISTOPHER CRAVEN LIFE Belfast H4A
    ANTHONY DEERY 20 Derry H4A
    CATHAL FOX 16 St James’s H4A
    SEAN GRIFFIN 16 Toome H4A
    PADDY IRELAND 10 Beechmount H4A
    SEAN KELLY 24 Toome H4A
    SEAN KELLY LIFE Ardoyne H4A
    MARTIN LAFFERTY 19 Sion Mills H4A
    SEAMUS MADDEN 27 Toome H4A
    BILL MADDEN Toome H4A
    TOM McALLISTER 16 Lower Falls H4A
    ARAN McCART 17 New Lodge H4A
    MARK McDOWELL REM Short Strand H4A
    WILLIAM McGAHEY 20 Derry H4A
    SEAMUS McGARRIGLE LIFE Strabane H4A
    PATSY McGURK LIFE Tyrone H4A
    EAMON MOORE LIFE Derry H4A
    FRANK O’KANE 18 S/Derry H4A
    MICHAEL O’NEILL REM Dungiven H4A
    MARK SKILLEN 15 Beechmount H4A
    H4B
    CRAIG BANNON 14 Lisnaskea H4B
    PEARCE DARCY 8 Omagh H4B
    LIAM GALLEN 14 Tyrone H4B
    PADDY GALLEN LIFE Tyrone H4B
    EUGENE GALLEN 12 Tyrone H4B
    EDDIE GRIEVE REM Dungiven H4B
    FINBAR GRIEVE REM Dungiven H4B
    JOE HARPER LIFE Kilkeel H4B
    NOEL HEALY 14 Andersonstown H4B
    HARRY McCARTNEY LIFE Armagh H4B
    NIGEL McDERMOTT LIFE Strabane H4B
    JJ McGEOUGH 17 Tyrone H4B
    SEAN McGUIGAN 20 Downpatrick H4B
    DARCY McMENAMIN 8 Tyrone H4B
    LOUIS McNALLY 22 Tyrone H4B
    EAMONN MOORE LIFE Derry H4B
    DECLAN MOORE 20 Derry H4B
    DECLAN MURPHY 18 South Armagh H4B
    ANTHONY RAISEY 12 Short Strand H4B
    CONAL TIMONEY 5 Castlederg H4B
    H4C
    BRIAN ARTHURS 25 Dungannon H4C
    MARTIN BULLOCK LIFE Tyrone H4C
    KEVIN CAMPBELL 10 Dungannon H4C
    MICHAEL CARRAGHER REM South Armagh H4C
    GREGORY CARROLL 22 Armagh H4C
    STEVEN CONLON 20 Tyrone H4C .
    CORMAC CONLON 14 Armagh H4C
    SEAN CONNOLLY 20 Ballymurphy H4C
    ROBBIE DAVIDSON 14 Armagh H4C
    SEAN DUFFY 17 Tyrone H4C
    PAUL JOHN DUFFY 9 Derry H4C
    PAUL EDWARDS REM Belfast H4C
    NED FLYNN 19 Andersonstown H4C
    RICHIE HARKIN 20 Derry H4C
    SEAN HUGHES 12 Belfast H4C
    SEAN KELLY LIFE St James’s H4C
    OLIVER MASTERSON 24 Andersonstown H4C
    PAUL McEVOY 16 New Lodge H4C
    PADDY McGENNITY 18 Newry H4C
    BRIAN McGUIGAN REM Draperstown H4C
    MARTIN MINES REM South Armagh H4C
    DAMIEN NICELL LIFE Derry H4C
    MICK O’HARA 14 Armagh H4C
    MICHAEL TIMMONS LIFE Twinbrook H4C
    H4D
    MICHAEL BENNET 24 Andersonstown H4D
    LEO CUNNINGHAM 24 Kilkeel H4D
    JOHN DOBBIN REM The Markets H4D
    JOE DOHERTY LIFE New Lodge H4D
    PADDY DONAGHY 10 Andersonstown H4D
    GERARD GEARON REM Ardoyne H4D
    BRIAN HUNTER LIFE Ardoyne H4D
    TERRY LAVERY REM St James’s H4D
    HARRY McCANN 15 Randalstown H4D
    VIVIAN McDONALD 18 Tyrone H4D
    BERNARD McGINN REM Castleblayney H4D
    COLM McILWEE Belfast H4D
    NOEL McKAY LIFE Lower Falls H4D
    STEPHEN McSTRAVICK 14 The Markets H4D
    ALEX MURPHY LIFE Andersonstown H4D
    DOMINIC MURPHY 10 Tyrone H4D
    JOHN O’HAGAN 16 New Lodge H4D
    H5A
    SEAN BOYLE 18 New Lodge H5A
    PADDY CORRIGAN 10 Ardoyne H5A
    DAVID DELANEY 16 Ardoyne H5A
    TONY DOHERTY LIFE Derry H5A
    SEAN FAY 16 Andersonstown H5A
    MICHAEL HILLEN 21 Newry H5A
    FRANCIS MAHER 25 Turf Lodge H5A
    ROY McCOOL 20 Derry H5A
    DERMOT McERLAINE 11 Toome H5A
    STEPHEN McGUIGAN 12 The Markets H5A
    EUGENE McKEE 18 Andersonstown H5A
    MICHAEL McKEE 20 Ballymurphy H5A
    HUGH McKEE 22 Belfast H5A
    PETER MONTGOMERY 14 The Markets H5A
    DAMIEN MORGAN 25 New Lodge H5A
    STEPHEN MURPHY REM South Armagh H5A
    BARRY MURRAY 18 Lisnaskea H5A
    KEVIN MURRAY 18 Strabane H5A
    DOMINIC NICHOLL LIFE Coalisland H5A
    JOHN PEIRCE 10 New Lodge H5A
    TONY TAYLOR 18 Derry H5A
    SEAN McNULTY 25 Tyrone H5A
    H5B
    DON BROWNE LIFE Derry H5B
    BARNEY CAMPBELL LIFE Tyrone H5B
    BRENDAN CAMPBELL 20 Coalisland H5B
    MARTIN DILLON 14 Derry H5B
    CIARAN FERRY 22 Andersonstown H5D
    DARRAN FITZPATRICK 15 Lisnaskea H5B
    ARTHUR FORBES 18 Strabane H5B
    MARK HANNIGAN 18 Strabane H5B
    GAVIN HAWKINS 10 New Lodge H5B
    PAUL JOHNSTON 15 Andersonstown H5B
    BRENDAN McCANN REM Dermot Hill H5B
    JOHN McFADDEN 15 Lower Falls H5B
    JIM McGIVERN 20 Ballymurphy H5B
    MICKY McHUGH 14 Andersonstown H5B
    KIERAN MURRAY LIFE Lurgan H5B
    THOMAS O’DWYER 22 Beechmount H5B
    DERMOTT QUINN 25 The Moy H5B
    FRANKIE TENNYSON 17 Portadown H5B
    H5C
    TOM BRENNAN LIFE Strabane H5C
    MARK BROGAN 14 Derry H5C
    JAMES DUFFIN LIFE Tyrone H5C
    PETER LYNCH 24 Andersonstown H5C
    WILLIAM McATEER LIFE Strabane H5C
    JIMMY McCLEEVE LIFE New Lodge H5C
    PAUL McCREADY 12 Strabane H5C
    CHARLIE McKIERNAN LIFE The Markets H5C
    OLIVER McKINLEY 24 Lower Falls H5C
    TOM McVEIGH 16 Andersonstown H5C
    GERARD O’NEILL REM New Lodge H5C
    FRANCIS ROONEY 12 New Barnsley H5C
    MICKY ROULSTON 18 Fermanagh H5C
    PAUL STITT 22 New Lodge H5C
    JOHN TUMELTY REM Belfast H5C
    H5D
    GARY BRESLIN 18 Strabane H5D
    SEAN CAMPBELL 14 New Lodge H5D
    TARLAC CONNOLLY LIFE Armagh H5D
    KEVIN COSGROVE 21 St James’s H5D
    GERRY MAGEE 20 Antrim H5D
    EMMANUEL MARLEY 20 Ardoyne H5D
    SEAN MATHERS 20 Newry H5D
    DERMOT McERLAINE 11 Toome H5D
    PAT McGUIGAN 12 The Markets H5D
    PATRICK McMAHON 12 Turf Lodge H5D
    PAT MEEHAN 20 Derry H5D
    MARTY MOLLOY 24 Strabane H5D
    GARY MONAGHAN 15 Beechmount H5D
    JAMES MORGAN 14 St James’s H5D
    PAUD MULLIGAN 16 Lisnaskea H5D
    TONY O’NEILL 20 Andersonstown H5D
    PAT SHEEHAN 24+2 St James’s H5D
    SEANNA WALSH 22 Poleglass H5D
    CHRISTY WALSH 12 Beechmount H5D
    H8A
    MICHAEL MERVYN 17 Twinbrook H8A
    JOE BRENNAN 16 South Armagh H8A
    TOMMY BROGAN 30 Strabane H8A
    JAMES CANNING 30 South Armagh H8A
    THOMAS COSGROVE 16 Ardoyne H8A
    KEVIN DONEGAN 08 South Armagh H8A
    RORY DOUGAN LIFE Andersonstown H8D
    BERTIE DUFFY LIFE Belfast H8A
    HARRY FITZSIMMONS 16 Whiterock H8A
    BERNARD FOX 22 St James’s H8A
    TOMMY FOX LIFE Belfast H8A
    MARTIN GERVIN LIFE Coalisland H8A
    PACKY LEONARD 20 Short Strand H8A
    TOMMY MARRON 16 South Armagh H8A
    BRENDAN McANOY 25 Lower Falls H8A
    DECLAN McCOMISH REM South Armagh H8A
    SEAN McKINLEY LIFE Divis H8A
    CHRISTOPHER MORAN REM Belfast H8A
    SEAMUS MULLAN LIFE South Derry H8A
    MYLES MURPHY 24 Lower Falls H8A
    DAN ROONEY 16 St James’s H8A
    THOMAS QUIGLEY LIFE Belfast H8A
    H8B
    MICKY BRESLIN 25 Derry H8B
    MICHAEL CAMPBELL 18 New Lodge H8B
    MICHAEL DOHERTY 16 Ardoyne H8B
    JIM DONNELLY 22 Ballymurphy H8B
    MICHAEL DUFFY LIFE Beechmount H8B
    RAB FRYERS 25 Belfast H8B
    TOMMY HUGHES 10 New Lodge H8B
    THOMAS JACKS 20 Scotland H8B
    PAUL KAVANAGH LIFE Beechmount H8B
    BOBBY MAHON 12 New Lodge H8B
    PETER McALEESE 10 Toome H8B
    KEVIN McCANN 25 Lower Falls H8B
    LIAM McCOTTER 17 Belfast H5A
    GERRY McDONNELL LIFE Belfast H8B
    LIAM McNALLY 22 Andersonstown H8B
    THOMAS McWILLIAMS LIFE Ardoyne H8B
    DERMOTT MOORE LIFE Tyrone H8B
    RORY MORGAN REM Belfast H8B
    MARTIN NELSON 18 Lisnaskea H8B
    SEAN O’HAGAN 24 Dungannon H8B
    GERRY O’NEILL 16 Lower Falls H8B
    H8C
    GERARD BRADLEY 10 Unity Flats H8C
    DESMOND CHRISTIE REM Dublin H8C
    ROBERT CRAWFORD LIFE The Bone H8C
    BOBBY FITZSIMMONS 20 Short Strand H8C
    PADDY HAMILL 16 Portadown H8C
    SEAMUS HAWKINS REM Twinbrook H8C
    PHIL MANNING LIFE Clonard H8C
    PETER MARKEY LIFE Newry H8C
    BRENDAN LENNON REM South Armagh H8C
    TONY McCOLGAN 12 Omagh H8C
    DAMIEN McCOMB 30 Belfast H8C
    PAUL McCULLOUGH 20 Ballymurphy H8C
    BRENDAN McELKERNEY REM Lower Falls H8C
    KEVIN McSHANE 16 Beechmount H8C
    GEORDIE MERVYN 14 Beechmount H8C
    PADDY MURRAY 25 Beechmount H8C
    JIM SMITH 20 Ardoyne H8C
    BOBBY STOREY REM Andersonstown H8C
    ALBERT WEIR 18 Andersonstown H8C
    PADRAIC WILSON 24 Andersonstown H8C
    PATRICK MAGEE LIFE Belfast H8C
    H8D
    DAVY ADAMS 25 Andersonstown H8D
    LIAM AVERILL LIFE South Derry H8D
    GERRY BUTLER LIFE Ballycastle H8D
    STEPHEN CANNING 20 Andersonstown H8D
    COLM COYLE 14 Newry H8D
    SEAMUS DOHERTY 20 Derry H8D
    EUGENE GILMARTIN LIFE Belfast H8D
    SEAN HILL 16 Ballycastle H8D
    GERARD LOUGHLIN 15 Belfast H8D
    SEAN LYNCH 25 Fermanagh H8D
    GERARD MACKEN 25 Beechmount H8D
    STEPHEN MAGEE 20 Ballymurphy H8D
    KEVIN McCAFFERY REM Andersonstown H8D
    PADDY McGILLOWAY 22 Derry H8D
    FRANCIE McGOLDRICK 14 Lisnaskea H8D
    NOEL McHUGH LIFE Lisnaskea H8D
    JIM McVEIGH 24 Lower Falls H8D
    CIARAN MORRISON 25 Beechmount H8D
    PADDY O’DOWD LIFE Lurgan H8D
    FEILIM O’hADHMAILL 25 Twinbrook H8D
    DEREK SWEETMAN REM Dublin H8D

    Maghaberry
    PETER BATESON 25 South Derry Maghaberry
    MARTINA ANDERSON LIFE Derry Maghaberry
    ROSENA BROWN 20 Andersonstown Maghaberry
    AILISH CARROLL 15 Armagh Maghaberry
    GERALDINE FERRITY LIFE Tyrone Maghaberry
    ROSALEEN McCORLEY 22 Andersonstown Maghaberry
    ROISIN MCLAUGHLIN REM Donegal Maghaberry
    ELLA O’DWYER LIFE Tipperary Maghaberry
    MAIRE WRIGHT 24 Andersonstown Maghaberry
    Republic of Ireland
    Mountjoy
    BRENDAN DOWD LIFE Kerry Mountjoy
    TOMMY McMAHON LIFE Monaghan Mountjoy
    ANTON ROGERS 6 Donegal Mountjoy
    Portlaoise
    FRANK BURKE REM Dublin Portlaoise
    CIARAN CHAMBERS 7 Dublin Portlaoise
    GABRIEL CLEARY REM Dublin Portlaoise
    JOHN CONATY REM Dublin Portlaoise
    DEREK DOHERTY 25 Dublin Portlaoise
    TONY DUNCAN REM Dublin Portlaoise
    TOMMY ECCLES 40 Louth Portlaoise
    DREW GILLESPIE 10 Donegal Portlaoise
    JAMES GINLEY 7 Monaghan Portlaoise
    TONY HEANEY 15 Derry Portlaoise
    MATTHEW HENESSY 10 Dublin Portlaoise
    JIMMY HUGHES 12 Tyrone Portlaoise
    PATRICK KAVANAGH 6 Derry Portlaoise
    SEAN KINSELLA LIFE Monaghan Portlaoise
    DENIS LAHIFFE 9 Waterford Portlaoise
    PARAIC MAC FHLOINN 35 Dublin Portlaoise
    NOEL MAGEE 12 Donegal Portlaoise
    ANDREW MARTIN 5 Dublin Portlaoise
    SIMON MAXWELL 6 Westmeath Portlaoise
    PEARSE McAULEY REM Tyrone Portlaoise
    PATRICK MCCARTNEY 6 Derry Portlaoise
    BRIAN MCNALLY REM Dublin Portlaoise
    BRIAN McSHANE 40 Louth Portlaoise
    JOHN MOYNA 7 Monaghan Portlaoise
    PAT MURPHY 5 Meath Portlaoise
    PAUL MURRAY 6 Derry Portlaoise
    MICK O’BRIEN 18 Dublin Portlaoise
    BERNARD O’HAGAN 6 Derry Portlaoise
    CONOR O’NEILL 12 Tyrone Portlaoise
    MICHAEL O’NEILL 18 Limerick Portlaoise
    NESSAN QUINLIVAN REM Limerick Portlaoise
    PETER RODGERS 40 Belfast Portlaoise
    JERRY SHEEHY REM Limerick Portlaoise
    HUGH WILKINSON 6 Derry Portlaoise
    VINCENT WOOD 22 Mayo Portlaoise
    DENIS KINSELLA 25 Dublin Portlaoise
    PATRICK HAYES 30 London Portlaoise
    USA
    RICHARD 10 USA
    JOHNSTON
    KEVIN BARRY ARTT Belfast USA
    POL BRENNAN Belfast USA
    TERRY KIRKBY Belfast USA

  • Harry Flashman

    Dwatch reposting the same point three times doesn’t actually make it any more valid.

    However as you seem incapable of grasping a very simple point let me spell it out for you, the IRA were terrorists, the UDR was not, let me repeat for you in case you have difficulty comprehending this complex issue, NOT supposed to be terrorists.

    They were armed and equipped by the British state and put on to the streets to uphold the law and protect the citizens from terrorism, they weren’t actually supposed to be planting bombs in the vehicles of unarmed innocent civilians before massacring them.

    I do realise that this concept might not have occurred to you before but the British Lieutenant-Colonel who you quote at the top of your post seemed to have worked it out.

  • dwatch

    Dwatch, reposting the same point three times doesn’t actually make it any more valid.’

    Indeed it does, for your information the UVF murderers who hid behind uniforms of the UDR out of 50,000 members are minute compared to the tens of 1000’s of IRA murderers bomb makers and cowards who terrorised this country for 3/4 decades hiding behind women, children and other innocent citizens. Their evil deeds will never be forgotten.

  • Harry Flashman

    When a soldier has his UVF membership tattooed on his arm he’s not exactly “hiding” his true allegiance is he?

    Do you really believe that none of Somerville’s superior officers or fellow soldiers knew about his and the rest of the UVF’s infiltration of the UDR? If so then they must have been the most incompetent so-called anti-terrorist troops in history and it is just as well they were disbanded.

    They were either fools or knaves, the only two choices, you decide.

  • dwatch

    A final tribute to those 50,000 men who like Eric Glass served in the UDR. Without them the IRA would have been free to plant more bombs and murder more innocent citizens of Northern Ireland. This memorial unveiled in Lisburn sunday past is something they should all be deeply proud of.

    UDR memorial unveiled in Lisburn.

    http://www.u.tv/News/UDR-memorial-unveiled-in-Lisburn/4dfd9ec8-3497-44ac-84c2-b25c21edc7c4

  • vanhelsing

    Couple of things here boys. As a Unionist I am extremely proud of the sacrifice made by many UDR soldiers over the course of the Troubles. Over 250 were murdered either during their service in the Regiment or after they had left.
    However we need to be able to stand apart from the terrorists who murdered so many innocent people from both sides of our community in NI.

    My point is that Lt Col Beard is right – if there were members [and there were] of the UDR involved in the targeted and murdering of innocent Roman Catholics – we condemn them – period. No ‘ifs’ no ‘buts’ – period – they are no better than the IRA terrorists who were plotting to do the same thing to the security forces. Without doing this we end up squirming like the IRA sympathisers here – legitimising murder under immoral circumstances.

    There are no circumstances where we justify the murder of innocent Roman Catholics, Protestants, Police Officers [either now or then], soldiers, prison officers – whatever.
    We need to do this so we can stand up for the VAST majority of men and women in the UDR who were not terrorists, just decent people, doing a difficult job whilst knowing when they turned on their car – well that might be it.

    I further appreciate that some people were subject to unnecessary searches, some bigoted comments and generally unsatisfactory behaviour by a British soldier – again this is a wholly unacceptable code of conduct. I would only ask for some measure of understanding as you were not the one who lived each day wondering if you would ever see you wife and kids again – if today was indeed your day.
    There were 40,000 UDR soldiers during the troubles, by Harry Flashmans own figures, that is 0.07% were convicted of Murder or Manslaughter.

    Lets not bother to defend the 0.07% of terrorists who were in the Regiment but instead defend the 99.93% from the revisionist Republican agenda who would seek to paint the whole force as murders and bigots.

    Oh and Eric Glass is indeed a Hero:)

  • changeisneeded

    “There were 40,000 UDR soldiers during the troubles, by Harry Flashmans own figures, that is 0.07% were convicted of Murder or Manslaughter.”

    Now there are hardly gonna prosecute their own are there..
    youse boys cant see the wood for the trees can you..
    i can only feel sorry for you.

    as far as that intimidating piece of crap in lisburn goes. nice one its really going to get us places lads ..all the tourists are gonna come (does lisburn get any?) and look at it and then whisper to each other something like,
    “thats the army they had to disband because they where sectarian murdering terrorists in the pay of the queen.”

    keep that head in the sand boys and we will be flying the green before you know it..

  • vanhelsing

    @changeisneeded
    Congratulations. The best you can do is come up with is….”now they’re hardly going to prosecute their own – youse boys can’t see the woods for the trees can you” I marvel at the selectivity of republicans!

    To be honest the rest of your post is generic drivel so I’m not even going to comment on it. I spent time on a post giving qualitative and quantitative reasons for my argument. I could reference all the figures. The figures are in fact not in dispute.

    “keep that head in the sand boys” of course you’re the enlightened one judging by both your writing style and name! Oh and the only place that a green flag will be flying is Saudi Arabia. Feel free to emigrate:)

  • dwatch

    Two excellent posts vanhelsing,
    enought said, time to move on.

  • between the bridges

    Vanhelsing..excellent summary of the facts.

  • qwerty12345

    BtB Intersting you should congratulate Van Helsing on his statement of fact that members of the UDR were involved in the targeting and murder of Catholics.

    So, if UDR members were involved in this level of crime then why is it so difficult for some of you to admit that there was harassment and sectarian abuse going on which did the force terrible damage in the perception of the nationalist community.

    I can think of at least one quite high ranking catholic ex UDR man in Fermanagh who left because of what was going on and the general ethos. I have also spoken to at least one ex UDR man who told me of the relish with which some of his colleagues got stuck into “operations” in places like Garrison,Roslea and Newtownbutler.

  • between the bridges

    steve austins ankles ‘I have also spoken to at least one ex UDR man who told..’ gee whiz that must mean all the 39,999 where all the same to, but sure usones are all they same aren’t we?

  • otto

    Q. for all you military historians.

    If Eirigi are right that the Royal Irish Regiment’s general service battalion is the same thing as the home service battalions of the UDR on account of the UDR being amalgamated into the RIR as home service battalions in 1992 which Eirigi seem to think from this;

    http://www.eirigi.org/latest/latest141008print.html

    And if the RIR general service battalions (esp. in their air assault capacity) are the descendents of the Royal Ulster Rifles through their amalgamation into the Royal Irish Rangers in 1968,

    Then as the Royal Ulster Rifles glided into Normandy to capture Pegasus bridge on Day 1 of the Normandy landings (towed by my next door neighbour amongst others) and as the neighbouring village of Ranville was released from German control at the time (the first village in occupied france to be so)…

    Do Eirigi think the UDR liberated France in WW2??

  • qwerty12345

    “but sure usones are all they same aren’t we?”

    Clearly not.

  • Limerick

    Otto,

    The Royal Irish Rangers were formed in 1968 from the Royal Inniskillen Fusiliers, Royal Ulster Rifles and Royal Irish Fusiliers.

    The Royal Irish Regiment was formed in 1992 from the Royal Irish Rangers and the Ulster Defence Regiment.

    The Home Service battalions of the Royal Irish were disbanded in 2007, but their heritage is maintained by the regular and territorial battalions which remain. Not least the Conspicuous Gallantry Medal which they were awarded for their extended active service.

    Technically Eirigi are therefore correct, but no the UDR did not liberate France, though a fair number of their early members were certainly involved in doing so.

  • Harry Flashman

    I once got an awful earwigging when I jokingly muttered on seeing the RIR’s dress uniform of khaki and rifle green that they looked like Black and Tans. But given what is written above was I so far wrong?

    If we trace the lineage of the RIR back through the UDR which was raised to replace the B Specials which was raised as one of several paramilitary police units to support the RIC in the troubles of the 1920’s and that many of these auxiliary policemen wore the rifle green of the RIC and khaki tunics of the British Army…OK I’ll stop now.

  • Limerick

    Harry,

    The green trousers are in tribute to the Ulster Rifles, the green hackle to the Irish Fusiliers, the castle lapel badges to the Inniskillings and the cap badge to the UDR.

  • Harry Flashman

    The green is the standard green of a rifle regiment, hence the name, this was also the colour used by the old RIC which adopted the march and ethos of army rifle regiments.

    The cap badge is surely just the old “Faugh A Ballagh” of the old Irish Regiment rather than the UDR harp and crown badge.

  • Chris_Glass

    As the grandson to the victim of this i am proud to have him as my granddad and it makes me feel proud to think of all he has done in his past years this is why i had done an essay o him and why he is my hero and the person i look up to