Legacy issues?

The suspicious object which, on its discovery yesterday, caused a security alert in the Sligo Road area of Enniskillen, County Fermanagh, was, apparently, a “40-year-old mortar”.  Which would date it to [circa] 1971…

But whose “mortar bomb” was it?  And how long had it been in place?

Update  The “40-year-old mortar” is now being described as a “rocket propelled grenade” which “had been in the ground for 15 to 20 years” – it was disabled on Friday by British Army technical officers in a controlled explosion.

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  • Cynic2

    Were PIRA using mortars in 1971?

  • al

    CAIN says the first death by mortars was December 1972 so they were certainly creating them in ’72 and of course 40 years old would probably be an estimate. Could have been 36 years old.

  • Rory Carr

    “But whose “mortar bomb” was it? And how long had it been in place?”

    Why are you asking me (us), Pete? I don’t know. Besides which I don’t recall ever spending any time in Enniskillen.

    Would it not make for better blogging if you first ascertained whose bomb it was etc. and then you told us?

  • Fearglic

    just goes to show that history is so connected to today. i was at the Battle of the Boyne site recently (highly recommended if not only for the horsemanship and musket firing displays) will we have displays of IRA mortar firing or SAS PARA assassinations in tourists centres soon? “this is a re-inaction of….” what ever?? perhaps a mock up loyalist disembowelling of a catholic?

  • Pete Baker

    Update The “40-yearold mortar” is now being described as a “rocket propelled grenade” which “had been in the ground for 15 to 20 years” – it was disabled on Friday by British Army technical officers in a controlled explosion.