Colour photographs of Ireland in the 1920s

e7f0c87758bf6b10fbfba3116b510bceGreat set of colour photographs from Ireland in the 1920s. Chris has them marked up as National Geographic items. Extraordinary to see a generation of Irish people in colour whom many of us will only have seen in black and white,

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  • joeCanuck

    Loved the haycart one. I used to help bring in the hay exactly like that back in the late 50s on the farm where my granda was a retired labourer.

  • märsta

    Looking at the poverty it makes you why the English ever wanted it!

  • joeCanuck

    You miss the point, marsta. The peasants lived in poverty so that the masters could live in luxury.

  • lamhdearg

    Not that all the masters where English.

  • lamhdearg

    Where these pics taken in colour or coloured in, i ask as the girl (with the red hair) pic looks like a colouring in job my folks had done on a pic.

  • lamhdearg

    Is the big house mount stewart?.

  • Mick Fealty

    Don’t know. But why not ask Chris? Re colour. I would guess the colour is real. He also has post SF earthquake photos from 1906.

  • wee buns

    Great to see these pictures, which I think are probably autochromes, an early colour photography developed in France in the early 1900s. Pictures taken in the Claddagh Village in Galway in 1913 by French photographers show the fancy red cloaks of the women; stunning to have such a record.
    http://www.kennys.ie/News/OldGalway/10082006-CladdaghInColour/

  • joeCanuck

    Amazing pics you linked to , wee buns. I never realized that colour photography was available back then.

  • lamhdearg

    Autochrome it is then, thanks wee buns,

  • lamhdearg

    Mick
    looks like Mount stewart to me, think i will take me little one down there in the morning and double check.

  • Drumlins Rock

    its def Mount Stewart, would know it anywhere.

  • wee buns

    Joe nor did I until I stumbled upon the exhibition of these French photographers in Galway a few years back, of which there are hundreds. The Claddagh was since erased but at least the barefoot women, scarlett cloaks, the blackest hair & eyes you ever saw on an Irish person, remain. What puzzles me is why there are no photos taken/surviving from the famine.

  • Drumlins Rock

    and the brick buildings are at the Malone Rd, Lennoxvale junction, Belfast (read the comments below the pics, but as Mark said, google shows the house is still there behind the trees) I guessed it was South Belfast, does anywhere else do red brick houses like this?

  • lamhdearg

    Black irish.not gaelic, but are they vikings or cruthlin. my mother went barefoot in 1940s Belfast. the living remember.Great photos.

  • Mack

    Looking at the poverty it makes you why the English ever wanted it!

    These photos are almost a century old (or maybe more)! What do you think rural England (or even industrial urban England) looked like then (the richest country on the planet), never mind most of the rest of the globe (Asia, Africa, most of the Americas)?

    You are probably looking at people that had an above global average standard of living (look at the thatch work – the nice white washed stone walls etc). These aren’t run down slums. They aren’t famine era either.

    It’s a good indication of how far we’ve come in the last century that you think these people dirt poor. Vorsprung durch technik, again.

  • joeCanuck

    That’s a good point, Mack. I have visited quite a few such cottages still without running water etc back in the 50’s. They could be very comfortable with those open fires, relatively cool in the summer and quite toasty in the winter courtesy of thick walls and thatch. They were kept spotlessly clean even if they had only hardened dirt floors. The ones I visited are derelict now.