The Amelia Earhart mystery may soon be solved

Ever eager to take a share of wider fame, the Derry heritage industry will be as keen as anyone to learn the verdict of the tests on a sliver of bone found off Kiribati. Her story shows that Derry did not quite enjoy a monopoly of the famous American aviator but if the riddle of her disappearance is finally solved, it should give a boost to the little local museum, currently closed.

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  • redhugh78

    Brian,
    very interesting story this, thanks for posting.

  • JAH

    In a way I hope it isn’t solved. There’s something maybe more romantic in the idea of their ghost’s flying for ever in the Pacific sky…

    I’ll get my coat…

  • joeCanuck

    She was undoubtedly a brave woman but arguably a foolish person. I wonder what drives people like that. Just the thrill of the risk or a need for public acclamation?

  • Dixie

    After she landed in Ballyarnett outside Derry in May 1932 she spotted a handsome farm hand called Jimmy Gallagher picking potatoes in an nearby field. Their eyes met and she swore to return one day soon in search of this farmer with film star good looks.

    Five years later and unable forget Jimmy she told everyone she was going to fly around the world but she secretly flew back to Derry where she saw her love standing in the same field. She flew low and waved as she passed. Her love Jimmy turned to another farm hand Dan McCloskey and said “I think that cuttie has the eye for me.”

    Dan McCloskey replied. “I think she should have kept both eyes looking in front of her because she just crashed into Lough Foyle.”

    The two men watched the tail fin of Amelia’s plane sink below the waves and Jimmy said. “The wife would have kilted me anyway.”

  • joeCanuck

    Actually, the first time she saw him she shouted down “Where am I?” to which the boul Jimmy replied, “you can’t fool me, you’re up there in the air in a flying machine”.

  • pippakin

    Do people want the mystery solved? I don’t, the experts will be solving the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle next.

    Save us from those who want to take the mystery and romance from the world. Btw I have heard ‘explanation’s for the triangle but not proof, only theory.

  • Reader

    Joe Canuck: I wonder what drives people like that. Just the thrill of the risk or a need for public acclamation?
    There have been adrenaline junkies in every era. A few hundred years ago they would have died on a boar hunt, in another 50 years they will be doing rocket assisted bungee jumps from orbit. (Or it will be back to the boar hunts, depending on how the economy works out)

  • Reader

    pippakin: Do people want the mystery solved? I don’t, the experts will be solving the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle next.
    The Bermuda triangle may just be a statistical artifact. If it isn’t, then solving it may save a few lives. The option to not know the answer will still exist – e.g. rainbows are well understood, but not by very many people.

  • pippakin

    Reader

    I know, but don’t touch rainbows, at least not until after I have found the pot of gold.

  • JAH

    Years ago I read a great book by Ralph Baker called Great Mysteries of the Air. This has Amelia and many more mysteries most now forgotten. Worth tracking down.

    The Bermuda Triangle arose because of the loss of two British airliners going to Bermuda who didn’t pick up the radio beacon and didn’t have enough fuel to remain airborne. I worked for the company that had maintained the beacons and 30 years after their loss they still had a company edict preventing anyone for bidding for airfield comms business. There’s no mystery. Just technology that wasn’t up to the job.

    One of Barker’s mysteries included a Robert Maxwell type crook who disappeared by accidently opening the plane door and falling out…

    But saddest of all is the story of Bill Lancaster, lost in the Sahara in 1933 whose mumified body waiting for rescue was found 30 years later.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Lancaster_(aviator)