Summer Quiz

Ok – no prizes but 10 questions:
Answers added:
1.Who was the last UK MP to be condemned to death for treason? Arthur Alfred Lynch Fascinating bloke.
2.Where, in 1948, did the Orange Order support a successful unification referendum? Newfoundland nice little PowerPoint.
3. What book begins:
” All nights should be so dark, all winters so warm, all headlights so dazzling”? Nobody got this – Gorky Park by Martin Cruz Smith
4. Which viral video contains the immortal line:
“twinned with Guangxi province in China, there’s no province finer”? As linked in the comments below it’s Newport (Ymerodraeth State of Mind).
5. Which Ulster town is called Talbotstoun in Ulster Scots? BallyHalbert (should have spellled it Talbotstown?)
6. Which Derry athlete has become the first Paralympian to compete in the European athletic championships? Jason Smyth
7. Name the South American country with four letters in its name and a four letter capital city (within four seconds…) – Easy Peru, Lima.
8 What’s Carwyn Jones’s, Wales’s First Minister, connection with Ulster? Mrs Jones of Ulster background.
9. Complete the sequence, 58, 62, 70, 94…- 02, Brazilian World Cup Wins
10. Whose Dad was the Spanish Governor of Chile from 1788-1796? Bernardo O’Higgins

  • 1.Who was the last UK MP to be condemned to death for treason?
    ———–David Trimble
    2.Where, in 1948, did the Orange Order support a successful unification referendum?
    ———–Vatican City
    3. What book begins:
    ” All nights should be so dark, all winters so warm, all headlights so dazzling”?
    ———–Harry Potter and the Golden Sash
    4. Which viral video contains the immortal line:
    “twinned with Guangxi province in China, there’s no province finer”?
    ————Derry’s Culture City promo video
    5. Which Ulster town is called Talbotstoun in Ulster Scots?
    ———–Lurgan
    6. Which Derry athlete has become the first Paralympian to compete in the European athletic championships?
    ———–Gergory Campbell (in the 500 metre whine-a-thon)
    7. Name the South American country with four letters in its name and a four letter capital city (within four seconds…)
    ————–Argentina, capital – Poradown
    8 What’s Carwyn Jones’s, Wales’s First Minister, connection with Ulster?
    ———–he hates it
    9. Complete the sequence, 58, 62, 70, 94…
    ——————–1690
    10. Whose Dad was the Spanish Governor of Chile from 1788-1796?
    ——————–DeValera

    (sorry)

  • Drumlin Rock

    1. mosley
    2. Canada – Newfoundland
    3. watership down
    4. Newport State of Mind
    5. ballymoney
    6. best?
    7. Peru Lima
    8. her granny
    9. 2002 (back to democrat in whitehouse)
    10. d’isreali

  • Frontier Vulpine

    Is Talbotstoun not Ballyhalbert ?

  • Drumlin Rock

    i didnt wiki the answers till after, thats cheating, so most of them are guesses, and you have to answer them all!

  • Dewi

    Very good Wilhelm…

  • Dewi

    I make that 3 or maybe 4 with a following wind DR.

  • Bart

    ‘Harry Potter and the Golden Sash’ … jaysus that made me laugh.

  • 1.Who was the last UK MP to be condemned to death for treason?
    Never been one.
    2.Where, in 1948, did the Orange Order support a successful unification referendum?
    Has to be Canada if its not here but didn’t know they had a unification issue in 1948
    3. What book begins:
    ” All nights should be so dark, all winters so warm, all headlights so dazzling”?
    Must be Watership Down
    4. Which viral video contains the immortal line:
    “twinned with Guangxi province in China, there’s no province finer”?
    uuuhhh
    5. Which Ulster town is called Talbotstoun in Ulster Scots?
    Ballyhalbert?
    6. Which Derry athlete has become the first Paralympian to compete in the European athletic championships?
    Jason Smyth
    7. Name the South American country with four letters in its name and a four letter capital city (within four seconds…)
    Peru Lima
    8 What’s Carwyn Jones’s, Wales’s First Minister, connection with Ulster?
    no idea
    9. Complete the sequence, 58, 62, 70, 94…
    02
    10. Whose Dad was the Spanish Governor of Chile from 1788-1796?
    Brown or O’Higgins or one of those guys

  • Drumlin Rock

    doh, 2000 to republicans, I should think it through, have wikied the rest now.

  • Paddy Hoey

    Ah, the Welsh card is played.
    I know (6) Jason Smyth & (7) Peru/ Lima and (9) is 02 – Brazil world cup wins.
    But, without googling I also know that the “twinned with Guangxi province in China, there’s no province finer” question is the recent peerless smash hit redux of ‘Newport” by Jay Z/ Alicia Keys. Which can be viewed
    here

  • Dewi

    John – that’s 5ish (what sort of answer is 10! can’t give alternatives..)

  • Drumlin Rock

    still cant get the first one dewi, even with the help of Wiki.

  • Well, I know one or other of them was a descendent of a local colonial mandarin – I’d guess O’Higgins since his family had fought in some of the continental armies.

  • Alan Maskey

    UK MP would have to be post 1800. Mosley was nopt condemned to death though a well connected Lord (or such, not Haw Haw) did get into deep s–t for working with Hitler.
    Casement was not an MP (though he liked buggering them) and I do not think any of the Black and Tan era Irish MPs were done for treason. Nor was Bernie Devlin though the British authorities did carry out as botched execution of her.
    That just leaves an MP who shot his mouth off or would not fight in either World War. Though Ian Paisley fits both of theswe categories, he is,alas, still alive. As is his mate, the Deputy, who has a thing about traitors.

  • OK.

    I’ll add to the suggestions above these two:

    #1: a bit of a stretch, but Admiral Byng was executed by a firing squad of Marines, on the deck of HMS Monarque, 14 March 1757. He was found guilty under the twelfth article of war (not strictly “treason” therefore. He was “elected” MP for Rochester (a seat controlled by the Admiralty) in January 1751.

    #8: Mrs Carwyn Jones

    #10: Bernardo O’Higgins was the “natural” (as they say) son of Ambrose Higgins of Ballynary, co Sligo/Ambrosio O’Higgins (a.k.a.”the Shrimp”, because of colouring, not size) and María Isabel Riquelme de la Barrera y Meza (he was 57, she was just 18). And the appointment as governor and captain-general of Chile should date from 1787, though he did not arrive in Satiago until the following year.

    As for #2, my stab would be one of the administrative tidyings-up in West Africa.

  • Alan Maskey

    Malcolm: Not West Africa but Canada and Newfie etc.

    And the UK dates from 1801, so if you are right, we have on a technicality. And by God, does he deserve a Bynging.

    More generally, htf does Dewi expect people to get these right? I ended up watching University Challenge recently. Again, how do these guys know such an eclectic amount of trivia. I have known some of these types in my time. They do not read papers; they studyu and memorise them. But Dewi’s would stump them.

  • Dewi

    Malcolm – you’ll get 1 if you think Boer War (and I said condemned not actually executed……)
    and another clue – the first line of Watership Down was..”Hazel sniffed and turned to Fiver: “Can you smell gas?”” ..or something like that!!

  • Tochais Síoraí

    1 Eamon De Valera.

    He was sentenced to death for treason after the 1916 Rising ( but the sentence wasn’t carried out because he was a US citizen). He was elected an MP for Clare East in the 1918 Westmiister General Election.

  • Hedley Lamarr

    The first line of “Watership Down” is “The primroses were over”. Richard Adams knew better than to start with jokes about rabbits being run over.

  • The illogical numbering of my previous post was partly ignorance, partly third thoughts, and partly because the O’Higgins question was already answered.

    Now totally off-topic, but because I have a butterfly mind:

    By the way, the Talbotstoun question (#5) could be even more confusing if it had referred to HMS Corncrake (the name of the RNAs station there). There are also WW1 war graves in St Andrew’s churchyard, including some of the 197 killed when the armed merchant cruise HMS Bayano was torpedoed by U-27 off Corsewall Point (11 March 1915). That’s that lighthouse to starboard, just before the Stranraer boat bears into Loch Ryan.

    I came on that because of the subsequent fate of the U-27.

    On 15 Aug 1915 the U-27 stopped the SS Nicosian (carrying American mules and war supplies), off Queenstown/Cobh.

    Onto the scene, under a false US flag, came the Q-ship HMS Baralong. Baralong, under US colours until the denouement, closed on U-27 and sank her. There were a dozen survivors who made it to the Nicosian. Captain Herbert of the Baralong sent his marines, who hunted down and shot the Germans. The Admiralty made serious efforts to hush up a possible war-crime, but Americans on the Nicosian spilled the beans. The incident prompted a heated denunciation in the Reichstag, was used to justify U-boats sinking-without-warning, and other reprisals.

    Delete as applicable.

  • Oh, Llareggub!

    #1: Arthur Lynch! Australian-born Redmondite MP for Galway Borough (1901-03) and later (1909-18) for West Clare. And colonel of the 2nd Irish brigade in the South African war. Stood for the ILP in Battersea in 1918.

    More than a bit of a chancer, with some very flexible views.

    Yet another of the “stars” that sat for Galway: lest we forget T.P.O’Connor and Willie O’Shea.

  • Tochais Síoraí

    Alternatively the answer the no. 1 (and probably the answer you want as I think he was a serving MP at the time) is the Irish-Australian Arthur Lynch, Irish Party MP for Galway who was sentenced to death for fighting against the British in the Boer War (he was a commander in the Irish Brigades). Again the sentence wasn’t carried out.

    He was later pardoned and served again as MP for Clare West until somewhat ironically he lost his seat to Sinn Fein in the 1918 landslide.

  • Agreed: great minds think alike (see my post @ 5:48 pm).

    With one small amendment:

    MP for Clare West until somewhat ironically he lost his seat to Sinn Fein in the 1918 landslide.

    Twenty-five of the Sinn Féiners elected in 1918 were unopposed, including both de Valera in East Clare and Brian O’Higgins in West Clare.

  • Dewi

    got it.

  • Dewi

    When no one is deserving of winning our primary poetry prize at the National Eisteddfod the adjudicator cries:
    “Neb yn Deilwng” which means “No one worthy”
    Malcolm – a profile of Mr Lynch on your blog ASAP please.
    Watership effing Down…..

  • Dewi

    correct

  • At last the Dodo said, EVERYBODY has won, and all must have prizes.

    Meanwhile Arthur Albert Lynch: how did I avoid doing him over previously? He really was a piece of work. Unpredictable, unreliable, opinionated, but with many redeeming qualities. Anyone capable of annoying so many “worthies” (all the way from the Irish Parliamentary Party to the clerisy) cannot have been entirely bad.

  • And thanks, Dewi.

    A good one.

  • Drumlin Rock

    I’m still proud of myself for getting the Nufie question 🙂
    was there a few years ago, it is still so Irish (both the loyalist & Republican types) that it was starting to give me the creeps! you felt as if you were in donegal or ballycastle or towns like that.
    Even when Orangism was at its height here the NFL order still had a higher proportion of the adult male population, whilst at the same time having the only active Gaelic speaking population outside of Ireland.

  • Dewi

    Updated with answers – I’ll do another one this weekend….

  • Tochais Síoraí

    Aaah, you beat me! And you’re right of course about the unopposed contests in that election. Been a long time.

  • Tochais Síoraí

    Nufie – an t-aon áit lasmuigh den Euraip a bhfuil ainm ar leith uirthi i nGaeilge.

    The only place outside Europe whose name is distinctive in Irish – Talamh an Eisc (Land of the Fish)

  • Dewi

    ain’t you got biblical stuff – like Egypt? We have in Welsh..

  • Alan Maskey

    Unless Malcolm Redfellow (or Dewi) is an avid reader of Ireland’s Own, ain’t no way he would have the answer gto question 1 at his finger tips.

  • Admittedly.

    Which is why it took some hours to eliminate the obvious William Smith O’Brien MP (guilty of treason for the “Battle of Widow McCormack’s Cabbage Patch” at Ballingarry, 29 July 1848, sentenced to death, and then shipped to Van Dieman’s Land).

    My second (and rather silly) thought was Admiral Byng. It took Dewi‘s broadest of hints to bring Lynch to mind, whom I had also come across in contexts far different from Ireland’s Own: as a GP in Haverstock Hill, Hampstead who stood for the ILP in 1918 (see reference above) and his claim that his greatest achievement was The Case Against Einstein.

    In a cerebral connection with that last sentence (and a standard quiz question in Norf Lunnun), what, after 18 April 1955, did Dr Thomas Harvey take home with him from Princeton Hospital on 18 April 1955? [No Irish connection that I can see.]

    As I say, Lynch was a remarkably complex and contradictory character. He even “fought” and won Galway Borough (at the second attempt) without leaving Paris, where he consorted with Maud Gonne. When he did return, it was Carson who prosecuted him. Found guilty, he spent time in Brixton prison studying the same text that de Valera had in internment at Arbour Hill (Hamilton’s Quaternions.

    And here’s another aside:

    Which British and Irish ruler was the longest-lived? [Predictably for a quiz question, he was not the obvious “she”. And our subject’s dad had stong and memorable Irish involvement.]

  • Hedley Lamarr

    Oliver Cromwell’s son? I apologise I do not know his first name.

  • Hedley Lamarr

    Richard!!!

  • Indeed “Tumbledown Dick”. He came to mind because Arthur Lynch tormented the Irish clergy (among many, many others) by being an outspoken fan of Oliver Cromwell, as well as flaunting his “mixed” marriage and his unabashed Parnellism. Anyone so contrary cannot be entirely bad.

    For the record, Vicky checked out (22 Jan 1901), aged 83 years, 7 months. Richard was the Cromwell’s fourth child (of nine) and third son (of five). His span was 4 Oct 1626 to 12 July 1712: which I reckon up as some eight “reigns” (including his own brief stint as Lord Protector from 3 Sep 1658 to — effectively when he dissolved Parliament and power slipped to the Army — 22 April 1659. His formal resignation was delivered to the Rump on 25 May. His final public office was as Chnacellor of Oxford University (he resigned that in May 1660). Then, wisely and effectively bankrupt, he slipped into anonymous exile on the Continent, using a variety of pseudonyms.

    Pepys makes several references to him through the 1660s, which suggest the Secret Service were keeping a watchful eye. Richard C. slipped back into England around 1680-1, and quietly lived the rest of his life on an income of £120 a year from his former estates at Hursley, mostly as a lodger with the Pengelly family round the corner here, almost opposite the Five Bells pub in East End Road, Finchley (which is why, from the heights of Muswell Hill, I became aware thereof).

    And from the great originall:

    Hedley Lamarr: My mind is a raging torrent, flooded with rivulets of thought, cascading into a waterfall of creative alternatives.
    Taggart: Gal-darnit, Mr. Lamarr, you use your tongue prettier than a 20-dollar whore.

  • Dewi

    Einstein’s brain of course!
    Best Einstein quote:
    “Make everything as simple as possible – but no simpler”

  • I couldn’t find an Irish link for Einstein or Dr Harvey, but I did my best tangentially with Bertie Alfie Lynch.

    I see my post @ 09:40 is still “awaiting moderation”, presumably because of the appropriate, if ripe quotation from Blazing Saddles, so, without said quotation and probably without hot-links, here we go again:

    Indeed “Tumbledown Dick”. He came to mind because Arthur Lynch tormented the Irish clergy (among many, many others) by being an outspoken fan of Oliver Cromwell, as well as flaunting his “mixed” marriage (she was one of a pair of Galwegian Methodist sisters Lynch met, I think in Germany) and his unabashed Parnellism. Anyone so contrary cannot be entirely bad.

    For the record, Vicky checked out (22 Jan 1901), aged 83 years, 7 months. Richard was the Cromwell’s fourth child (of nine) and third son (of five). His span was 4 Oct 1626 to 12 July 1712: which I reckon up as some eight “reigns” (including his own brief stint as Lord Protector from 3 Sep 1658 to — effectively when he dissolved Parliament and power slipped to the Army — 22 April 1659. His formal resignation was delivered to the Rump on 25 May. His final public office was as Chancellor of Oxford University (he resigned that in May 1660). Then, wisely — and effectively bankrupt, he slipped into anonymous exile on the Continent, using a variety of pseudonyms.

    Pepys makes several references to him through the 1660s, which suggest the Secret Service were keeping a watchful eye. Richard C. slipped back into England around 1680-1, and quietly lived the rest of his life on an income of £120 a year from his former estates at Hursley, mostly as a lodger with the Pengelly family round the corner here, almost opposite the Five Bells pub in East End Road, Finchley (which is why, from the heights of Muswell Hill, I became aware thereof).

  • Can we do this more often?

  • Dewi

    Sure – working on it….

  • Drumlin Rock

    might have a go myself some week Dewi if thats ok 🙂

  • Dewi

    Feel free!

  • Devil Eire

    Malcom:

    “Found guilty, he spent time in Brixton prison studying the same text that de Valera had in internment at Arbour Hill (Hamilton’s Quaternions.”

    In 1940 Erwin Schrodinger moved to Ireland (at de Valera’s invitation) to head the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. Schrodinger organised a 1942 conference on quantum mechanics in Dublin. From the conference, P.A.M. Dirac wrote to his wife of his surprise at seeing de Valera attending every lecture and taking detailed notes. Dirac wondered how de Valera, as prime minister, could spare the time. (In an amusing detail, de Valera subsequently took Schrodinger and Dirac for a spin about the countryside in his car.)