Éirígí! or should that be ‘Rise-igí Up’

Éirígí, the new kids on the republican block have been in the mouths of the people, or at least in the mouths of political nerds for a few weeks now. I know that in Belfast that they have attracted a fair scattering of younger Irish speakers but I wonder what impact they will have on the wider organisation?

Section 3.5. of Éirígí’s constitution, also available in Irish on their website states

.. To promote the revival of widespread, everyday usage of the Irish language across Ireland, and to encourage a deeper understanding and appreciation of the role of Irish culture in contemporary Ireland.

That is pretty standard stuff. No radicalism. No imagination.

In my experience the republican socialists in Dublin are perhaps one of the more alienated from the Irish language of the political viewpoints described as republican, will this provide a source of tension in the future? I predict it will.

Éirígí’s website is monolingual English however, with occasional bilingual press releases, always relating to the language itself, although there is some policy content in Irish. I would expect more frankly.

Make no mistake however, Sinn Féin are not alot better. Sinn Féin’s website is ‘bilingual’ on clicking a difficult to find Gaeilge button, however it is not hard to find that that bilingualism is merely skin deep. There is an obvious similarity with the Fianna Fáil approach.

The 32 County Soveignty Committee’s committment to anglicisation seems pretty clear from their website.

To my knowledge only the Communist Party of Ireland is the only party to have a completely bilingual website ttp://www.communistpartyofireland.ie/.

Maybe politics is just a Béarla thing? Maybe politics is just a Béarla thing? Maybe people should read Ó Cadhain and not just quote the bits they like?

What is clear is that there is no Irish Plaid Cymru.

  • industrial average

    In my experience the republican socialists in Dublin are perhaps one of the more alienated from the Irish language of the political viewpoints described as republican, will this provide a source of tension in the future? I predict it will.

    GGN,

    I know of one “full time” republican in Dublin who believes that the Irish language is an irrelevancy and that such green tinges should be fought as being distractions from the real workers struggle

    Hard to fathom that! Do they believe we should stay in the UK seeing as how all workers are one etc etc. Why waste our time leaving when we could be there standing with our fellow workers.

    I support the fight for an equal society. I dont see where being proud of my language and culture weakens that.

    lookin at the results for Dublin republicans, whatever their credo, in recent elections its plain that whatever page they are on its a different book to most Dublin people who see themselves as republiucan.

    Will it cause a future trouble? Who knows sure by that time they may have learned that national identity is not a construct of big business. If they haven’ then the voters will have kicked them to touch and replaced them with ordinaty Republicans

  • ersehole

    éirígí as bhur gcuid seafóide

  • Gael gan Náire

    ersehole,

    Cé ab chóir éirí as a gcuid seafóide?

  • Is simiúl go baineann éirigí úsáid as an réalta ghlas, ar nós na gluaisteachta Esperanto (“la verda stelo”).

    Maidir le páirtithe polaitiúla, ar chuala éinne faoi Eŭropo Demokratio Esperanto?

  • ersehole

    Bhuel GGN, ní scríobhann tusa seafóid anseo.

    Ach cuireann éirígí agus sinn féin soir mé scaití.

    Agus neart eile. Ó ham go chéile sílim gurb í an phairtí is ionraice ó thaobh na Gaeilge de ná an TUV!

  • Con

    Éirígí‘s website is monolingual English however, with occasional bilingual press releases, always relating to the language itself

    What a poorly timed piece of gibberish, considering that of the five articles posted on the éirígí site in the past week, three have been bilingual. Only one of those related to the Gaeltacht or language issues, the others were about the ongoing strike/lock-out at Dublin Port and a campaign around unemployment that they have launched in the Coolock area of Dublin. So much for “the republican socialists in Dublin are perhaps one of the more alienated from the Irish language”.

    And didn’t you post almost the exact same piece just a few months ago? What’s the thing you have for éirígí?

  • Jonrus

    Eirígí roughly means YOU rise (plural)… wouldn’t WE rise be more appropriate for an Irish socialist group? I’m not sure what this would be

  • Jonrus,

    While “Éirigí” mightn’t be an an accurate translation of James Larkin’s “Let us arise” (“Éirímis”), it is the first word of the Irish translation of “L’Internationale”.

    Eirigi, a lucht ocrais, as bhur gcodladh!
    Eirigi, a dhaoraithe na gainne!
    Mar anois ta an reabhloid ag tonnadh,
    is ta deire le re na cainte!

  • Mark McGreg

    GGN,

    In éirígí’s case you have to be a bit more realistic about the aspiration over the implementation. You note correctly that in Belfast but beyond they have attracted a number of Irish speakers into their ranks, a fair few that have it as their first language. However they are, unless I’m mistaken, operating on a volunteer basis with no salaried staff and certainly no core of translators or fulltime press/web team.

    While you reference the CPI as bilingual you must surely realise they aren’t actually engaged in much real activity or regular online material.

    One of my complaints about éirígí and I think a more substantial one, is they keep promising policy papers – on areas I’d love to hear their take, they even mention production of them at ard Fheisenna but they have just not delivered what they stated.

    I’d prefer to see them focus on using a limited man power on getting policy down on paper before investing resources they don’t have on 100% bilingualism.

    And to be honest picking out éirígí for particular criticism while only giving a passing reference to the major funded SF with a mass of salaried staff and their decades long failings in this area seems, well churlish (at best).

  • Tugaim faoi deara nach ndearna na páirtithe polaitiúla ráitis maidir leis an gcás Mhic Ghiolla Catháin ach Sinn Féin agus éirigí.

    http://www.sinnfein.ie/contents/16931

    http://www.sinnfein.ie/contents/17129

    http://www.eirigi.org/latest/latest150709.html

    Ach is docha go ndéanfaidh an SDLP ráiteas chomh maith.

    http://sluggerotoole.com/index.php/weblog/comments/sdlp-promise-action-on-1737-justice-act/

  • Darragh

    Mark, you commented that

    One of my complaints about éirígí and I think a more substantial one, is they keep promising policy papers – on areas I’d love to hear their take, they even mention production of them at ard Fheisenna but they have just not delivered what they stated.

    so what!

    They say they stand with the workers, that they are purer socialists than the rest of us and that they want more radical change than the rest of us.

    In irish politics that type of talk is a license to never sit down and write up some solid policies.

    Writing policies that are real world policies is a challenging step mentally for some.

    Its easier to say where you want to be than how you get there.

    Its the Irish Left way unfortunately

  • GGN

    Con,

    Obviously I have tried to give to a view of the website over a period of time.

    Mark,

    I think my critism of Sinn Féin’s ‘bilingual policy’ was quite strong actually.

    All of this groups mentioned all strong on rhetoric and weak in reality on the Irish language – which is the political norm and has been for 4 scór years.

    I had high hopes that many of the young people who went into Éirígí were capable of breaking that cycle one way or another, this they have not so far done. Go n-éirí leo.