Bastard

I normally deplore expletives but on this one, I can’t think of anything else to say. Why doesn’t that bombastic bully O’Leary stop inflicting torture on his customers, do the honest thing and just put up the fares?

Ryanair is to start charging customers to check in online. The no-frills airline said that check-in for all its flights booked after May 20 would be by website only and that passengers must pay £5 to do so. Passengers without a printer must find access to one or pay a £40 charge for arriving at the airport without a boarding pass.

  • Pigeon Toes

    Children cannot be booked in online.

    So parent has to pay for that. Also when a debit card booking is made, they charge per customer, per flight.

    Bastard, yes I agree ad refuse to fly with them…

  • skullion

    Very simple don’t fly with the little prick.

  • susan

    Brian Walker, O’Leary’s a squid, but it is unintentionally hilarious that first word, the very first headline, anyone visiting Slugger for the first time after seeing the BBC’s link “Belfast Blogger Wins International Peace Through Media Award” will be the single word “Bastard.”

    “We’re not Brazil,” etc., etc., etc.

  • Expenses111

    O’Leary is an attention seeker and Brian you are giving him the attention he craves. As Susan says this site as won an award and the first word people see is a crude word

  • fin

    I’ve always found this arguement strange, watchdogs and the government believe people cannot use a website where the amounts add up depending on how you book your flight, yet the same government expect the same people to arrange their own private pensions by investing in shares.

    Simple question is understanding the Ryanair website any more difficult than understanding the stockmarket, which is more important, which consumes more money.

    Is this more criminal than the collapse of banking and the property economies, nope, didn’t think so, if you don’t like Ryanair than don’t use them, however if used properly, you will struggle to find better value for money.

    The major plus point for Ryanair apart from price, and only paying for what you use is that they get people and their luggage on and off the plane in a fraction of the time of other airlines.

  • Easy answer to the problem – don’t fly Lyinair.

    Easy explanation for the problem – truth-in-pricing rules are insufficiently robust, so O’Leary has a chance to advertise unrealistically low fares, which there are still plenty of people gullible enough to believe. Not only believe, but boast to you that they got their flight to London for “£39 one way and 1p on the return leg!” when in total they actually paid the same £100 you paid with BMI, and are far more likely to get whopped with penalty charges for breaking any of Lyinair’s girls’ boarding school rules, all for worse service.

  • Neil

    Man I flew with Ryanair, and I can safely say I’ll pay more from now on. I understand that if I weigh each bag individually, get a Visa Electron bank card, leave the kids at home, check in online and eat or drink nothing I can bag a bargain, and by bargain I mean I can save about a tenner per flight compared with Easyjet. But fuck all that. Last time I flew it cost me 140 quid over and above the flights before I even got on the first plane, and as we all know the ‘customer service’ isn’t so much bad as ‘what customer service, we’re Ryanair we’re too busy for that, piss off and come back with the money’.

    I sincerely hope the writing’s on the wall for them, I’m venemous, like many due to my experiences with them, Easyjet is like Singapore Airlines next to Ryanair. Well worth the extra few quid.

  • Mack

    The £5 charge appears to be unavoidable and must surely form part of the price of the ticket.

    The £40 charge for arriving at the airport without a ticket is fair enough. If most passengers use the online check-in, Ryanair would have less need of check-in desks at airports, thus reducing their overheads. Nobody is forced to fly Ryanair, everybody knows what they’re like. Always that Aer Lingus’ ad tag line was pretty smart – “Aer Lingus, enjoy your flight”.

  • kensei

    I went to see a friend in London recently for a weekend and could manage without checking in a bag – avoid all the crap and they really are abotu 20-30 quid cheaper return. Any other way and they are much more expensive. The five pounds is just an across the board increase in ticket prices, and I hope it is enforced in the advertised cost.

    Mack — yes, it’s fair enough to force online check in to save costs. You have to book online and no one moans. The problem is that as well as cutting costs, you are enforcing an unavoidable charge to double up. Ryanair are going to fall foul of both legislation and pissing off their customers at some point.

  • Frustrated Democrat

    Never have flown with them and never will

  • joeCanuck

    I have never flown with them so I have no personal “horror story” to relate. Yet I understand that this company is fairly successful.
    Why?
    Are there more masochists flying with them as compared with their competitors?

  • Being penalised for not owning a printer now. There’ll be a charge for people using the wrong kind of paper to print next!

  • Neil

    Are there more masochists flying with them as compared with their competitors?

    People believe that their flights will be cheaper because of the online quoted price, and as evidenced here some people will be happy to travel with carry on bags only and avoid difficulties and expense this way.

    But there are also many people who will have had an awful experience, and people who know that when travelling in Europe with a batch of kids you really are better plumping the few quid to get an airline that might try to help you if something goes wrong. If Ryanair get their way there won’t be a single Ryanair rep in the airport. If it goes tits up your on your own. I do reckon that crunch time is coming. You always get so much custom if you’re cheap, but sooner or later your business will tail off if cheaper means hidden costs, and no customer care. The time’s coming O’Leary. Personally I’ve voted with ma feet. Flying Easyjet to Spain this year, and looking forward to it.

  • Dave

    And despite all the whingers, Ryanair’s low-cost business model has led it to success after success. What the moaners don’t grasp is that O’Leary is playing them for the self-defeating idiots they are, relying on their hate-fest for tonnes of free publicity. His PR stunt re paying to use the toilet was genius, with ABC News in America opining that it would lead to class action suits from customers with urinary tract infections. Likewise, O’Leary said at a press conference to announce his new long-haul new airline, RyanAtlantic, that its first class section would offer free blowjobs. The best little business model in the EU.

  • Jamie Gargoyle

    Up until now, Ryanair was bearable for a lone traveler going a short distance for a short time (e.g. me nipping to Belfast to see my folks for a weekend with a small bag & strategically placed change of clothes left in their wardrobe for such occasions) and with some careful hoop-jumping, it was possible to get extremely cheap deals for their somewhat unpleasant service (the only flight attendants that uniformly resent your presence on the plane, that poxing jingle they were idiotic enough to think would be a chart hit, constant advertisements for Bullseye f*ing Baggies, etc. ad nauseam) in the knowledge that money saved was worth the brief period of unpleasantness… and lets face it, flying is no longer pleasant even if it ever was, between the crotch-fondling stasi on minimum wage that passes for security, queues, more shops than the average mall (and every one of them overcharging for the small percentage of items you have any interest in actually buying) so knowing the plane would be about as bad as the rest of it was no great pain.

    However, a mandatory check-in charge on top of a mandatory £5 fee for each credit card transaction (which in itself must be a massive markup for IIRC the average retailer fee is 1.5% of the purchase price, and you can be certain Ryanair have demanded a better deal than that from their bank) means no return ticket can be cheaper than £20, or is likely to be cheaper than £50. No bargains possible, or those that exist are no longer worth the hassle for the paltry reward.

    Time to look elsewhere. No great loss in the end.

  • kensei

    Dave

    And despite all the whingers, Ryanair’s low-cost business model has led it to success after success.

    The problem being, Dave, is that Ryanair is ceasing to be “low cost” and is becoming high hassle. The toilet thing was a stunt, but this is more serious and is effectively raising prices.

    Complicated purchasing and billing, poor public service and a bad reputation is not a formula for a successful. Eventually that catches up with businesses. My money is on that it won’t happen until things pick up again, but it’ll happen.

  • Dave

    Kensei, it never was low-cost. You can’t make a profit on 1p seats (and most pay mugh higher prices). The trick is in making it look low-cost. And once it is the lowest cost, that’s all you need to sustain it. When O’Leary talks about cutting costs, folks love it because no one wants to pay extra for what should be more than a bus ride. The more they whinge about it, the more the message goes out that Ryanair is cheap. Folks want cheap. That’s the fact.

  • Neil

    What the moaners don’t grasp is that O’Leary is playing them for the self-defeating idiots they are, relying on their hate-fest for tonnes of free publicity.

    Yes, that must be what it is. O’Leary wants as many people bitching and complaining about his service as possible. As everyone knows the best way to generate business is to, erm, fuck all your customers off and have them spouting vitriollically about how shit your company is. That way all the new customers reading, say, this blog for example, will now be falling aver themselves to get on a Ryanair flight. Being as how almost everyone reckons their shit.

    All publicity is not good publicity, unless you’re a rock star. People complaining about shit service does not encourage other customers to try aforementioned shit service.

  • Dave

    Typo: “…no one wants to pay extra for what should be [b]no[/b] more than a bus ride.”

    Look at it this way, you’ll be longer on a bus going from Luton to central London than you’ll be on the plane. So would you pay £50 fpr extra leg room on a bus or complimentary coffee? No, you’d be raging if you paid mor than £10 for the ticket. It makes no sense to pay extra for what is just a bus ride in the air. Folks get that.

  • Dave

    “All publicity is not good publicity, unless you’re a rock star.”

    Wrong, all free publicity that says you’re cheap is great publicity when your business model is no frills. No one cares about the legroom, etc. They see it as a short journey bus ride, not a hotel in the sky that lasts an hour.

  • fin

    older people here will remember what Aer Lingus used to charge for a London Dublin flight with the added bonus of a stuck-up wife of a pilot earning a small fortune as a stewardess.

    with Ryanair travelling from London to Dublin these days the bulk of the cost is the airport tax. Last time I arrived in Dublin I bought a starbucks latte for €4, that was almost 20% of the cost of the flight

  • Neil

    “All publicity is not good publicity, unless you’re a rock star.”

    Wrong, all free publicity that says you’re cheap is great publicity when your business model is no frills.

    No offence but total bollocks. Bad publicity about being charged extra and getting shit service is bad publicity. This publicity is not saying they’re cheap. It’s saying that you can tack on between ten and eighty quid per flight, with no tangible benefit to the flier.

    A fair percentage of the posts refer to stealth charging, how the flights are actually more expensive than other carriers. All this free publicity is unlikely to encourage a single person to use Ryanair. It may encourage several to consider someone else.

    I understand and agree totally that this is what the game was with the one pound toilet fee, very good, because it was bullshit no one had any reason to get wound up and it’s just free publicity. This publicity is about Ryanair being more expensive and having shit service, no matter what way you slice it that’s not good.

  • Neil

    Just to underline my point a set of return flights with easyjet to Stansted on 15th October with one bag – full and final price 58.98. Same flights, same dates, same airports etc. quoted 37.35, click next add online check in and 1 bag and it’s up to 67.35 (yes 30 quid to bring one bag and check in online – the cheapest option).

    Ryanair – slightly more expensive and worse service. Brilliant publicity that, cos it’s free.

  • kensei

    Dave

    Kensei, it never was low-cost. You can’t make a profit on 1p seats (and most pay mugh higher prices). The trick is in making it look low-cost. And once it is the lowest cost, that’s all you need to sustain it.

    Wrong. It was low cost in that was significantly chepaer than its competitiors. And it still is – if you are single, put in no hold luggage, can put up with the shit service and the fact they only bother to notify you of the gate 2 seconds before closing. And you could pick up bargains, if you were flexible in your timing. I know this because I have done both. The success is not a trick; it is a result of agressively pursuing their price goals and increasing access to flights for a lot of people.

    I understand the impulse. But they’ve got so fantical about that, they’ve been blinded to the down side and the risk to the business of complicated charging, stealth charging and porr service. Tesco Value Coke might be much cheaper than Coca Cola, but the real thing outsells it massively.

  • Gabriel

    O’leary is similiar to paddy power in that they are both arrogant attention seekers who pull off great PR stunts time and time again.

  • Belfast Greyhound

    A few years ago I damaged my back quite badly in Italy and only with difficulty escaped from an Italian hospital where the Surgeon was insistent that I remain and have a little minor surgey (he wanted to remove a disc) and allow me the chance to learn some hospital Italian as I recovered over the minimum of six weeks I would be there.
    With the help of friends and a cocktail of mix it yourself pain relief pharmaceuticals I got to the airport and looked for a wheelchair from the Ryanair desk.
    It was sitting there winking at me and cooing that I was not going to get it as the Ryanair staff argued that ‘it had to be booked in advance if it was needed’!At least three days notice was required.
    This from a company that flies to destinations where people go skiing!
    When we forced them to release the chair, thoughts that money was wanted to change hands figured in my mind, then they would not allow it to get too close to the aircraft (probably afraid I would run away with it) and made my friends carry me across the tarmac and up the steps to board.
    Things were almost as bad on the UK side when we landed, though not quite.
    Fly with Ryanair, the airline that always has a problem and makes you reload the information only to see that the price had gone up, everytime you try to book one of the ‘cheap’ fares!!!
    I go somewhere else where I don’t have to use them or just use a different airline now.
    As for Ryanair, I would not piss on them if they were on fire

  • fin

    This from a company that flies to destinations where people go skiing!

    ah, the nanny state, I’m off to partake in a dangerous pastime please ensure that you take care and full responsibility for me. Am I the only one who expects an airline to fly me from A to B, I can insure myself, I can feed myself, I can buy my own drinks, and thank you for charging me less if I only need hand luggage instead of 4 suitcases.

  • kensei

    ah, the nanny state, I’m off to partake in a dangerous pastime please ensure that you take care and full responsibility for me.

    No, fin, just please ensure you are covered for all eventualities, particularly those, you know, likely to happen, because as a paying customer I will greatly appreciate it and not only fly with you again, but tell all my friends and family how good you were. That’s aside from probably having statuatory duties to deal with even temporarily disabled people.

    Jesus H Christ. Has anyone else got as pressing need to defend shit service?

  • Mack

    You can’t please everyone. They’re on the right track, they’ve clearly targeting their cheapest service at a particular segment.

    I don’t think they expect people to pay the £40, they simply don’t want your business if you don’t have a printer.

  • fin

    surely Kensei, their resposibilities lie around flying people from a-b.

    Belfast Greyhound has just reminded me off another courtcase regarding a wheelchair (which Ryanair lost) O’Leary pointed out that the individual got to the airport, got to the checkin desk and then demanded a wheelchair. Not wishing to be simplistic but the previous post described leaving a hospital (wheelchair?) getting to the airport, and going to a lowcost airline and asking for a wheelchair!!! FFS he/she travelled miles before deciding a wheelchair was needed.

    The reason I actually like Ryanair is that they don’t charge everyone extra to be “covered for all eventualities” which are only availed off by a few.

  • Ulsters my homeland, not yours, get your filthy ha

    You go Brian, let it out of yeh

    I usually shout such profanities when black pepper gets stuck in me teeth after a meal.

  • 6countyprod

    As long as his flights work out cheaper than his rivals he will continue to get costumers. My son has booked me on a number of 1p flights this year with Ryanair (to L’Pool and E. Midlands), and they actually worked, 1p each way! Now it will cost 5.01. What’s the problem? You could hardly get a sandwich and a cup of coffee at Aldergrove or G Best for that.

    Okay, the plastic seats are a bit uncomfortable and the trumpet for early arrivals is corny, but you’ll not get better value, anywhere!

    For all you Ryanair haters, just fly BA, BM, easyJet or someone else and pay more, but stop your flippin whingein about Mr O’Leary! You might upset him and I’ll not get my 5.01 flights anymore 🙁

  • 6countyprod

    Now’s the time to get that nice printer you’ve always promised yourself. Just think of all the money you would be saving every time you printed up you Ryanair tickets. Sure it would pay for itself in no time!

  • Flying Ryanair is not mandatory. That makes doing so masochism, not torture.

  • Dyinair

    Travelled with Ryanair twice before. I shoul have learnt my lesson first time round, true that there’s no fool like an old fool.I have to say though that I thought that the £70 surcharge for not being head butted in the face by the cabin crew upon embarking / disembarking was a great deal.

    Perhaps O’Leary thinks that his arrogant abrasiveness in treating his customers with undisguised resent and contempt is a headline grabber I personally think that his obnoxious fuckwittery is disgusting.

    Cheap flights me arse. Don’t do it, it’s just not worth it.

  • An oldie, but a goodie:

    Guy is sitting in an airport bar, when a woman comes in and sits down near him. As she’s wearing what appears to be a flight attendant’s uniform, the guy thinks to himself “I wonder which airline she works for?”



    Being a bit of a know-all and hoping to hit on her, he leans towards her and utters the Delta slogan, “Love to fly and it shows?”



    She gives him a blank, confused stare, and the guy immediately thinks to himself, “OK, she doesn’t work for Delta”.



    A moment later, another slogan pops into his head. He leans towards her again, and says “Something special in the air?”



    She looks at him and says “Excuse me?”



    “Hmmm” he says to himself, “She doesn’t work for Singapore Airlines either.”

    Next he tries the Thai Airways slogan, “Smooth as silk”.



    This time the she faces him full on and says, “What the fuck do you want?”



    Bloke replies, “Dammit, I should have guessed! Ryanair!”

  • with Ryanair travelling from London to Dublin these days the bulk of the cost is the airport tax

    You are gullible.

    The overwhelming bulk of which isn’t a tax at all – another area where airlines have got away with lying about their fees (Lyinair are far from the only offender, merely the worst). The ‘airport tax’ is what the airport charges the airline for the cost of runways, terminals, air traffic control, etc., and then some of the bastards (BA) had the cheek to add a ‘fuel surcharge’ at the height of the oil price spike.

    Imagine Translink advertised 20p fares, but then tried to charge you £3.00 on the bus to cover a ‘diesel surcharge’ and ‘road tax’. Would people accept this bullshit, I think not.

  • My son has booked me on a number of 1p flights this year with Ryanair (to L’Pool and E. Midlands), and they actually worked, 1p each way!

    Did you actually pay 2p for a return flight? No, you didn’t. What was the real cost (you know, the cost that includes minor details like the fuel required to fly the plane)? And what would it cost if you weren’t free to fly at 3 am on the third Tuesday in the month carrying nothing but a paper towel and a banana going bad?

    GerryOS – genius.

  • kensei

    Mack

    You can’t please everyone. They’re on the right track, they’ve clearly targeting their cheapest service at a particular segment.

    I think they’ve went off the right track. It’s okay to target the price sensitive, but you ideally want the pricing simple and the service good. It is not a good idea to show contempt for your customer.

    Exclusively target the price sensitive and you wind up as Tesco Value Cola. As I pointed out, taht’s grand, but Coke has the bigger market.

    fin

    surely Kensei, their resposibilities lie around flying people from a-b.

    Actually no, fin, they extend well beyond that. They have statutory duties for a start. Trying people like shit is also not a good way to run a business as in the long run, it is all about repeat business and recommendation. But in any case, if the dude can’t get on the bloody plane without the wheelchair (or it is extremely painful for them to do so), then they are failing their a to b bit anyway, no?

  • fin

    Kensei, how did the dude get to the airport? why didn’t he demand a wheelchair from the hospital, taxi company, the bus or train company, why demand one at the end of his journey.

    How much joy would you have if you turned up at a football ground, walked in and said that you actually needed a wheelchair and a spot on the edge of the pitch, and can your mate get in for free cosw he’ll push you around, oh and you’ll drop the wheelchair off after the game?

    Yet you think its reasonable to get to an airport by whatever means, walk up to the checkin desk and demand a wheelchair FFS.

    I was recently on a Ryanair flight where they gave an elderly lady just out of hospital a row of 3 seats to lie on, impromptu, her daughter asked for them when they got on the plane, would another airline do that?

    Sammy Morse is the Airport Tax not an actual government levied? O’Leary is always complaining about it.

  • Sammy Morse is the Airport Tax not an actual government levied? O’Leary is always complaining about it.

    Only a very small portion of what airlines call ‘tax’ is actually tax (£10 for UK departures to Europe, £40 for long-haul departures) – the vast bulk of ‘tax’ is actually airport charges. Now, some of this is a contribution towards the airports’ profits, but it also pays for things like runways, ATC, lighting, terminal buildings… you know, all the things passenger airlines couldn’t operate without. I think it is mendacious for airlines to pretend this is tax and not a core part of the fare; it would be like a bus company claiming its fares were 25p, but then levying a £1.75 charge for road tax, vehicle maintenance, fuel, etc. I do not think it is unreasonable for airlines to be required to tell the truth about their prices.

    Unavoidable charges (the £5 check-in fee, credit card fees), should not be allowed to be disguised but should be part of the fare. Ryanair is not the only offender nor, with credit card fees, is the problem even limited to the passenger air industry. But it is deceitful, IMHO. And people still fall for it.

    And Ryanair is the worst – a single Maestro or Visa transaction for a family of four on a return trip between Ireland and continental Europe via Stansted with Ryanair is £80 or €100. Of course it doesn’t cost eighty quid for Ryanair to process that transaction. This is, in my view, outright deceit and should not be allowed.

    If O’Reilly wants to operate flying cattle-sheds, that’s his business, but he shouldn’t be able to tell fibs about what the cost to passengers is. That’s hardly a radical suggestion.

  • For flights from the Republic, tax is €2 for departures within Ireland or to Cardiff, Glasgow, Prestwick, Liverpool, Manchester, Blackpool and Isle of Man. Otherwise its €10 anywhere in the world.

  • Harry Flashman

    As regards the much vaunted quality of service supposedly displayed by Ryanair’s competitors well I flew Aer Lingus last year and could detect no discernible difference between Ryanair and Aer Lingus.

    Beyond the obligatory and teeth grittingly smarmy “Ah shure ye’re welcome” Aer Lingus staff and Ryanair staff could be interchangeable as was the quality of service offered.

  • kensei

    Fin

    Kensei, how did the dude get to the airport? why didn’t he demand a wheelchair from the hospital, taxi company, the bus or train company, why demand one at the end of his journey.

    You are assuming he didn’t have assistance getting there: a general assumption you cannot make. In any case, for a disabled person there are laws to prevent discrimination. I am not sure what the law is regarding those that have a temporary disability and require assitance to the gate, but if someone is struggling it doesn’t take much thought to get to a. it’s bad form b. its bad business.

  • lurker

    Harry Flashman,

    Come on – did they really say “Ah shure ye’re welcome”, or was that the voices in your head again, replaying scenes from The Quiet Man?

  • Harry Flashman

    Honest to God, they do say that, I’m not making it up, just say “thank you” to an Aer Lingus hostie and you’ll get that nauseating faux Irish colleen response

    I’ve heard it so sphincter-tighteningly often that I can only conclude it’s deliberate corporate policy.

  • joeCanuck

    Ah shure ye’re just makin’ it up, Harry me boyo.

  • fin

    Kensei, I’m not a heartless git, however I believe in people taking a reality check on their behaviour, yes, Ryanair should provide a wheelchair, but yes as a no frills airline they should be allowed to charge for it. People know what they get for their money and to expect over and above it annoys me, purely because they’re sponging off everyone else.
    I’ve had bad experiences with Ryanair, but I understand the reasons why, namely used correctly their service is stupidly cheap. I’m a fan for several reasons, namely they’ve forced airlines like Aer Lingus and BA to offer a reasonable priced service, Aer Lingus years ago charged crippling prices for flights between London and Dublin and the attitude of their staff was shocking and stuck-up in the extreme, BA splashed cash and freebies around as if they had a bttomless pot of cash.
    Also I have a softspot for O’Leary I love his Gobsh*te persona and I also feel that if Ryanair was a British company the media would be much kinder towards them (eg I stopped buying anything from Woollies years ago because everything was defective, yet note the weepy eyes over their demise)

  • mnob

    Sammy – it is perfectly possible to pay 1p for ryanair flights. I have done it. That is what was charged to my visa electron card – no taxes – no surcharges 1p – period.

    If you pay by visa electron and take no bags then that is what you pay (even under the upcoming arrangements).

    What I value more than anything in short journeys are on time flights and ryanair deliver those in spades (unlike a certain other airline who bused me round east midlands airport for 30 minutes to avoid paying for ‘refreshments’ more than a few times)

  • Mayoman

    Fin, you seem to be coming at this as if O’Leary was running a benevolent business designed purely to allow ‘poor’ people to travel. Of course, this is bollix. He’s running an anti-business. That is, he is skilled in finding the absolute limit where the product is cheap enough to remain attractive even though it is crap. This business model is about finding the amount of shit that people can take. The problem with this model, what people need protecting against, is the application of fees for services that don’t exist. For example, the priority boarding charge is negated in places like Treviso airport (laughingly marketed as a Venice airport!), where an exit passport check renders the service unworkable (been there, done that). How can they be allowed to charge for a non-existent service in this case? The other appalling aspect is the repeated charges for a single credit card transaction. Also, when using Ryanair at Treviso airport, I witnessed a crush down a small escalator that nearly caused a young child to be trapped under a pile of bodies — a consequence of the ludicrous situation of not allocating seats and the ensuing cattle run. As with all products, people, even those patronisingly so ‘poor’ they have to use Ryanair, should be protected from being ripped off, and have a right to safety, regardless of how cheap the product.

  • gram

    mnob>>Sammy – it is perfectly possible to pay 1p for ryanair flights. I have done it. That is what was charged to my visa electron card – no taxes – no surcharges 1p – period.

    If you pay by visa electron and take no bags then that is what you pay (even under the upcoming arrangements).<

  • ORACLE

    TIME TO SWITCH TO EASY JET, LET THE BUDGETS KNOW THE CUSTOMERS ARE THERE… JUST NOT THERE WITH RYANAIR.

  • not impressed

    I’ve used ryanair and found them basically similar to all the other budget airlines.

    I really do wish they, and all other airlines, just gave me a price – instead of a price, tax, “charges”, credit card fee and other comedies like a booking fee or “check in” fees.