Survey of slugger readers.

Please take a minute to take this survey. It would be interesting to see who reads slugger and comments.
***update*** Survey re-opened.
Click Here to take survey

The data from the survey would be useful in implementing new ideas for discussion on slugger.

Also please use the comments for any ideas you would like to see happen. In the middle of these harsh economic times would anyone like to see discussions on accessing benefits or survices if they
are out of work, or shortly to be made unemployed? Share any tips for help for those who need to access services at this time. All to often such knowledge is not widely available and is passed from word of mouth.
With a lot of people out of work, through unemployment or retirement or any reason, would live blogging of football or other events be useful, or daily open threads for discussion of current affairs?

Update As I didn’t make it clear, all or any comments/questions re services would be taken to the CAB and hopefully a little video response like David Camerons would be used for answers.
Results so far here.

  • Dec

    In the middle of these harsh economic times would anyone like to see discussions on accessing benefits or survices if they
    are out of work, or shortly to be made unemployed?

    I’m sure the CAB are quaking in their boots. Seriously though, whilst I appreciate you’re merely floating ideas, are you seriously suggesting people are encouraged to use this site to solicit unqualified and often anonymous advice?

  • Kathleen

    I’m sure the CAB are quaking in their boots

    Do you ever find anything positive or decent to say? Can’t you appreciate an effort?

    Share any tips for help for those who need to access services at this time. All to often such knowledge is not widely available and is passed from word of mouth.

    A tip is a hint, or a clue not one to one advice. And for your information I’m trying to make enquiries with the CAB if there is a demand for any tips on where to access services.

    Some people!

  • Rory Carr

    This idea of sharing experiences and tips from those who have had to work their way through the minefield of seeking benefits to which they have become entitled because of unemployment or for other reasons seems like an excellent one, Kathleen.

    If the recession is to continue and deepen, as seems all too likely, thought might be given to reviving branches of the Claimants’ Union which were so effective as self-help groups for those seeking benefits in the 70’s and whose Welfare Claimants’ handbook I used to good effect against a Social Security Manager attempting to break a strike by denying benefits to strikers’ families. Using a clause in the Social Security Act, from which our attention was distracted and which the Manager attempted to wilfully misinterpret I finally won benefits for all but myself. The Manager, rather than deal with my claim in alphabetical order said that as I was accompanying each other claimant to their interview it was best I be dealt with last. So at the end of a long day, with just he and I in his office and he effectively beaten, he leaned forward with a little smile of momentary triumph and said, “You, Mr Carr, will not receive a penny on your claim. I am sure you feel that this is unfair but I am also sure that your handbook tells you how to appeal my decision. But as, by the time any appeal is heard the strike will be over and your need will have passed your claim will be denied. So good day to you.” I had to smile as the poor guy had a rough day thanks to me (and the Claimants’ Union Handbook) and he was entitled to something to salvage his wounded dignity.

    Actually, I’ve just realised, Newham in East London has a thriving group with a good web-site here: http://www.newhamclaimants.org.uk/ which I am sure would be helpful.

    By all means, if it becomes necessary, avail yourselves of the good offices of the CAB and like institutions, but remember they are overstretched and likely to become moreso and when all is said and done, they are a branch of the establishment. Always remember, the Lord helps those best who help themselves; so do draw together for support, upkeep of morale, sharing of experience, unity of purpose and retention of dignity if the hard times start to bite.

  • It was Sammy Mc Nally what done it

    Katleen,

    what happened to yesterday thread on UI – I know Kensei was on your case but surely delete just his comments if that was the problem. From a “customer” point of view that is not very good. EagleEyes in particular had posted quite a few very interesting facts which I wanted to reference and there were another series of posts which challenged what EagelEyes had said and I had not read fully. V. poor show.

  • Dec

    Do you ever find anything positive or decent to say? Can’t you appreciate an effort?

    The remark was clearly flagged as a joke. I think I referenced the fact that you were merely floating ideas in my post and pointed out the possible flaws. That being said I’ve been coming here for quite a while (almost nine years and I’ve been positive once or twice) and whilst I appreciate you’re fairly new here, my advice would be to develop a thicker skin. You seem to be developing a penchant for having a lash at those who at divergence with your views.

    A tip is a hint, or a clue not one to one advice. And for your information I’m trying to make enquiries with the CAB if there is a demand for any tips on where to access services.

    That’s fine except the original post proposed unqualified advice and service provision but since you’ve now removed that bit from the thread it appears we agree.

    Btw I should point out that one of my parents was a Branch Manager in the CAB for almost 30 years so I’ve secondhand experience of how beneficial advice provided by qualified staff is. For anyone interested in such, here’s a link.

  • Driftwood

    Could get a bit difficult in mid-Ulster?
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/7778229.stm

  • Dec

    From that report:

    The Magherafelt District Advice Service, which has replaced the CAB office, is funded by the council and has offices at its headquarters.

    “The need was clearly there for a new professional advice agency which we are now happy to inform you has been set up and is in practice,” said a statement from the service at the time of its launch.

    The Magherefelt DAS must have a blog too.

  • Mark McGregor

    My two cents:

    I’d be inclined to very careful on the advice stuff; personal circumstances can greatly impact on advice given so you’d need to be very careful assumptions aren’t made or hopes raised based on the particular situations presented. Plus you don’t want to get it wrong on an area that affects real life.

    CAB already operate an excellent email advice service and people with genuine problems would be better contacting that.

    Live sports seems a big step away from the general site remit, though it has been tried before to varying levels of success. Is anyone really going to get their sports fix from Slugger over a dedicated website? (though Pete’s crickey updates did work well)

    Mick tried open threads before and in the main they ended up like a chat room. Alright for casual conversation but added little of real substance.

  • I wholeheartedly endorse the idea that republican posters should share their expertise as regards the benefit system. 😉

  • Kathleen

    That’s fine except the original post proposed unqualified advice and service provision but since you’ve now removed that bit from the thread it appears we agree.

    I didn’t remove anything dec, I simply added an update to explain it better which I’d forgotten.
    I know Kensei was on your case
    Sammy yes Kensei and I have now sorted out our differences.
    my advice would be to develop a thicker skin.
    I am at this less than two weeks guys, I’m just trying to settle in. I’m not asking for kid gloves, just a little breather to find my bearings.

    Rory thanks for your input.

    Mark, you are most likely right. Still these are times of high unemployment it might be useful to look again at the live blog or open thread. One thread out of a whole site once a week for people to chat on various issues might work now due to the times that are in it. Trail and error maybe?
    Or any other suggestions.

  • Dec

    I didn’t remove anything dec, I simply added an update to explain it better which I’d forgotten.

    My mistake, Kathleen. Apologies.

    I am at this less than two weeks guys, I’m just trying to settle in. I’m not asking for kid gloves, just a little breather to find my bearings.

    That’s fair enough, but it works both ways, that’s all.

  • ggn

    When are we going to get intial results from the survey?

    I need results! predictions, exist polls, anything.

  • Dec

    I wholeheartedly endorse the idea that republican posters should share their expertise as regards the benefit system. 😉

    Maybe we could get a local politician to answer Slugger reader questions about benefits. Perhaps a DUP MLA…

  • When I click on the link this is all I get (on a green background, for those of a paranoid persuasion):

    This survey is currently closed. Please contact the author of this survey for further assistance.

    Is it closed already? You didn’t give us much time. Especially those of us with jobs – that might skew the results.

  • Dec

    Especially those of us with jobs – that might skew the results.

    Cheeky! My job provides constant internet access. is all. We can’t all dig ditches for a living.

  • Kathleen

    Dec thx. 🙂

  • Kathleen

    Dec thanks. 🙂

  • Kathleen

    I didn’t close it. I’ll have a look. Its a basic account and might only take so many, I’ll have a look.

  • Kathleen

    Thats it, I;ll need to update to a paid account. hold on.

  • It was Sammy Mc Nally what done it

    Kathleen,

    I repeat “what happened to yesterday thread on UI”???

  • Dave

    Sammy, I think it’s fairly obvious what happened to them. Kathleen had a bit of an emo hissy-fit and deleted them. If I can forgive her for destroying my valuable contributions, why can’t you forgive her for deleting your… if ‘contributions’ isn’t exactly the right word… em, posts? 😉

  • Pandarus

    As a casual visitor to slugger I find it like many other pro Irish Nationalist sites. Sure it plays it a little more cute than, for example, offerings from the likes of érígí even going through the charade of having some ‘unionist’, (or is it “onionist”?) contributors.

    Of course these are quickly corralled by the coterie of on-message slugger regulars.

    Charles de Gaulle was quoted in 1963 saying “nationalism (is) when hate for people other than your own comes first”.

    The majority of the slugger contributors forcefully illustrate that apophthegm.

  • Rory Carr

    By your own hand, Pandarus, your above contribution would indicate that you might youself be a nationalist of a different order to Irish nationalism and just as aptly illustrated by de Gaulle’s, not-so-pithy-really, saying.

    In any case de Gaulle was on that occasion taking issue with Algerian pied noir ultra-French nationalism and its most dangerous manifestaion in the Organisation de l’Armée Secrète (OAS) which had many similarities to ultra-British nationalistic Ulster Unionism and the British Army Curragh mutineers. Unfortunately there was no British de Gaulle to stand up to those disloyal army thugs.

    In Quebec, de Gaulle sang an entirely different hymn, if you recall – “Vive le Québec libre !”.

    In any case, what the hell has de Gaulle, Irish nationalism, érígí or unlawful sexual congress with armadilloes for that matter, or indeed anything else, got to do with this, Kathleen’s thread on how contributors, visitors – both regulars and casuals (and even casualties) might like to see improvements to the site?

    Do tell us, please, for we’d like to know.

  • Nomad

    Pandarus,

    You are unlikely to find a better site for Northern Ireland news and opinion (in blog format at least). I like to think of myself as having an extremely mixed and open political view and appreciate a very open, but directed, platform here*. If you think views are underrepresented, I’d suggest it’s because those people aren’t interested in entering a discussion. I find that a pity but know an enormous amount of people who don’t care. It’s maybe a factor of growing up in North Down, but people I know have little interest in this kind of engagement, so I exercise here.

    The Slugger commentariat is often barbed, but more often pretty respectful. Perhaps too many are not open to new ideas though.

    I am but a casual visitor too. Although while work is slow it’s becoming quite frequent!

    *[Directed in the sense of having TUV/SF/DUP/UUP/conservatives/socialists as main contributors.]

  • It was Sammy Mc Nally what done it

    Dave,

    “If I can forgive her for destroying my valuable contributions, why can’t you forgive her for deleting your… if ‘contributions’ isn’t exactly the right word… em, posts? ”

    How dare you – I wont have my contributions spoken of in such a fashion – I shall call you “a big fat prod.” There – what do you say to that.

    I actually wanted to read the stuff posted in reply to EagleEyes (he was a contributor armed with many interesting facts) and then suddenly there it was gone.

    Katleen, how goes your investigation into the very mysterious case this missing thread?

  • Dave

    Charles de Gaulle, despite his many contradictions as an ardent French nationalist and a Euro-federalist, at least possessed the honour to resign from public office after a referendum that he supported was defeated by the French public.

  • Pandarus

    Rory Carr

    Disinclined as I am to engage in an online squabble, the stock-in-trade of slugger it seems to me, I will make one further comment.

    Firstly, I will be a BNP member if that makes you feel more comfortable and allows you to file me in a place you deem most suitable. Secondly, thanks for the Dick & Jane history lesson.

    If you care to read over the penultimate paragraph in your post, no. 23 on this thread; sidestep the abuse and you will note you outline that Kathleen’s thread seeks views on “improvements” to the site. Perhaps she did not mean improvements to content and balance, and even if she did perhaps you are already comfortable with both. Whatever is the case I simply offered an opinion.

    Your petty post-opening convinces me I was right to do so.

  • Nomad

    “Charles de Gaulle was quoted in 1963 saying “nationalism (is) when hate for people other than your own comes first”.

    “Firstly, I will be a BNP member”

    I wonder why one intends to join a nationalist party while apparently publicly condemning nationalism?

  • Mack

    Sammy
    I posted a comment towards the end of that thread, don’t know if that’s what you’re looking for but maybe will encourage however posted it to repost if not..

    Eagle eyes
    “There is no good reason, at least as at 2001 census, to say that CCB will ever be >50% in NI. However it is still possible, but probability <0.5. "

    I would take issue with that. There are three measures relevant to demographic forecasting

    1. Current number of births by community
    2. Birth rate by community
    3. Rate of change in birth rate by community

    In 2001, in official analysis, those three were

    1. Roughly equal births by community
    2. Higher Catholic birth rate
    3. Catholic birth rate falling faster than Protestant birth rate.

    The projections that stated CCB would never exceed PCB were predicated on the birth rates converging by 2006 with no immigration. This has not happened (on both counts).

    http://www.ined.fr/fichier/t_publication/792/publi_pdf2_pop_and_soc_english_390.pdf

    Birth rates bottomed out in 2000 (if 2001 is regarded as an anomoly) and have been rising ever since. Large scale immigration occured after the entry of the accession countries to the EU in 2004. Given that it takes time to grow numbers, settle & 9 months to make a baby we are probably only seeing the effects of this now (birth rate per thousand in Newry and Mourne was 19.0 is Q1 2008).

    http://www.nisra.gov.uk/archive/demography/publications/annual_reports/2007/Table3.4_2007.xls

    They have been rising faster in nationalist (or predominantly Catholic districts) than in unionist ones.

    The birth rate also rose (at roughly the same rate) in areas where the number of children to mothers born outside the UK did not change significantly (E.g. Derry)

    http://www.nisra.gov.uk/archive/demography/publications/annual_reports/2007/Table3.21_2007.xls

    I would agree that the change will be relatively slow, over a long period of time. (And the forces driving the change are themselves subject to change)

  • Dave

    I don’t understand the importance of the ‘sectarian headcount’ method of securing a UI. It assumes that all Catholics support a united Ireland, and that all who support a united Ireland would vote for it irrespective of any applicable material considerations or political conditions. It also assumes that the citizens of the Republic of Ireland (who also hold a veto) would also vote for a UI irrespective of applicable material considerations and political conditions, e.g. even if an extra circa 30% of their disposable income goes in taxes to pay for it and even if it means a de facto extension of the bi-national state that exists in NI into the Republic, etc. I certainly won’t be voting for it unless I see a cost-benefit analysis and if it turns out to be a Trojan horse by which the British-controlled Shinners revert the island to its pre-1916 status, substituting independence for Redmondite Home Rule.

  • Mack

    Dave – “I don’t understand the importance of the ‘sectarian headcount’ method of securing a UI”

    Unsurprisingly, as there is no such method. Surely you understand the importance of sectarian demography within Northern Irish politics though?

    Anyway, as the future is very uncertain I’m of the opinion that both sides are better off continuing to compromise now. When planning my financial future, I like to manage risk (will there be high inflation or deflation, loss of employment etc And take steps to hedge my position against each eventuality – not only one of them). I reckon the northern politicians could with thinking about the future and the compromises they make along the same lines….

  • runciter

    I certainly won’t be voting for it unless I see a cost-benefit analysis

    Why not just put a price on your vote and be done with it?

  • It was Sammy Mc Nally what done it

    Mack,

    thats the very one – saw it in on email and deleted it with a view to reading on the website later – and there it was gone.

    Ta very much

  • Nomad

    runciter,

    “Why not just put a price on your vote and be done with it? “

    Some of us wouldn’t put our families into poverty to have Ireland reunited. I’m not saying that would happen- but there’s nothing wrong with any cost benefit analysis here. Fighting cultural reasons for reunification alone is not good enough for most people. But runciter, there are good arguements to be made, but people like yourself often forget to make them.

  • runciter

    there’s nothing wrong with any cost benefit analysis here.

    Cost/benefit to whom? Analysed by whom? Measured in what units?

  • Dave

    “Unsurprisingly, as there is no such method.” – Mack

    It is the ‘method’ that underpins the current political process: 50% + 1. The heads are eagerly counted in a manner that erroneously assumes that (a) a catholic head is a nationalist head, and (b) that a nationalist head will vote for a UI irrespective of considerations beyond cultural sentiment.

    What those who engage in this desperate ‘strategy’ fail to grasp is that a border poll will not be decided by one big question but rather by 1001 little questions e.g. what will happen to my long-term investments that require me to be a citizen of the UK?; How will I ever be able to retrain to learn Irish law when I am 59 and too damn old?; Why should I support a system that is other than the system that I prosper under, i.e. why should I vote for redundancy when the UK-wide company I work for does not do business in the Republic?, and How can I be sure that a small country like Ireland can support the pensions of an older population like NI? Thousands of the, and unless all of them are answered to each voter’s satisfaction, you are guaranteed a vote in support of maintaining the status quo irrespective of other sentiments.

    And by the way, don’t forget to classify those ‘immigrant’ heads as status quo supporters rather than simply ignore them in the headcount calculations on the curious delusion that they express no preference. They have an expressed a preference by voting with the feet to live within the UK and not he Republic of Ireland (also an option that was available to them).

    “Why not just put a price on your vote and be done with it?” – runciter

    Why not irradiate the dismal socialist culture of state-dependency that infects the nationalist class in NI and transform yourself into a class that is other than parasitical on the hard work and enterprise of the more prosperous and the less lazy, thereby alleviating the concerns of those who have zero intention of giving said useless ilk a free ride in any proposed unified entity? If you think I have any intention of paying extra taxes to support that sentiment, think again. I’d suggest you offer yourselves as a supply of cheap labour to Irish industry as a means of paying for your keep rather than imagining that you have a right to united with the Republic when the de jure legal reality is that you have formally repudiated it in the GFA, downgrading it to the legal status of an aspiration. Rights impose an obligation on others, whereas aspirations are entirely… well, asspirational. 😉

    In addition, good arguing that the Home Rule (the GFA) should be implemented in the Republic of Ireland just because you accepted its legitimacy in NI. We’re not Redmondites down here even if your lot has been manipulated to that position by puppets masquerading as other.

  • Dave

    Typo: “…good [b[luck[/b] arguing that Home Rule (the GFA) should be implemented…”

  • Mack

    Dave – I think your deliberately confusing this issue.

    “It is the ‘method’ that underpins the current political process: 50% + 1. The heads are eagerly counted in a manner that erroneously assumes that (a) a catholic head is a nationalist head, and (b) that a nationalist head will vote for a UI irrespective of considerations beyond cultural sentiment.”

    No it is not. Whether sovereignty is transfered from Westminster to Ireland (Republic) is only dependent on votes cast within Northern Ireland. The census is a sectarian headcount, a referendum is not. Votes are counted, heads are not. Realistically we know a large portion of Catholics vote nationalist and a large portion of Protestants vote unionist. While I agree that their votes on a referendum can’t be relied on upon, I would suggest that should a nationalist electoral majority emerge the internal nature of the dynamic in Northern Ireland would change – leading to closer integration with the south. You correctly argue that it’s more difficult to change the status quo however a majority (or even the largest grouping within a plurality) could create momentum that would also be difficult to resist (the status quo itself could trend closer to the nationalist position).

    A transfer of sovereignty for Northern Ireland does not entail any loss of sovereignty for Ireland (Republic). If you have hard evidence to the contary, please present it. The requirement for consociational arrangements could (and imho would) be contained within a devolved Northern Ireland within a UI.

    I agree with you that a United Ireland (should it ever come about) would involve significant pain for nationalists, who would bare the brunt of the change (by being forced into giving on ground on lot’s of small issues) rather than unionists. However, aside from possible anthem and flag changes (note the Agreement did not lead to such changes in the UK, or even ending of the bar on Catholics on the throne), I think this pain would be borne largely in the north rather than the south.

  • runciter

    We’re not Redmondites down here

    Who is we Dave? Your ideas seem on Irish politics seem very eccentric.

    Maybe you could answer my questions about your interesting suggestion that there should be a cost-benefit analysis.

    Cost-benefit to whom?
    Analysed by whom?
    Measured in what units?

    Thanks.

  • Dave

    Kids, why do you assume that your political leadership wish to change a new dispensation that they have all unanimously endorsed? Do you think that they will negotiate an internal settlement that includes a parliament where they can all be handsomely remunerated for playing pretend politics, and then immediately denounce the internal settlement as unworkable and something that must be replaced with a non-internal settlement? Hardly, once the political elite endorsed it, it then becomes the status quo. None of them, unsurprisingly, have any incentive to change it. They all become establishment parties.

    Political parties are vehicles by which self-serving specimens of mediocrity promote their selfish interest by conflating it with the national interest and, in examples of niche parties such as the Greens, the DUP or the Shinners, et al, conflating that selfish with the interests of those whose votes are required to increase the power of said specimens, thereby enhancing their prospects of furthering said selfish interest. That is why, for example, the Shinners will conflate a party that legitimised partition with support for a party that claims to oppose partition. “If you support a united Ireland, then support us” they will assure you, because “A vote for us is a vote for a united Ireland!” No, a vote for a Shinner is a vote for another pig to stuff its self-serving snout into Her Majesty’s devolved through.

    It comes down to the power of the status quo. The onus is on those who oppose the status quo to show why it needs to be changed. As someone (whose name eludes me) once said, “The status quo is the only policy that can’t be vetoed.” Those who prosper under the status quo tend not to be convinced by arguments that it needs to be changed. Because it can’t to be vetoed, it is embraced by default by all who fail to oppose it. At the moment, I don’t observe anyone opposing it except a few marginalised malcontents.

    There are two ways you oppose it: you can claim that there is a better option that will provide greater prosperity for all or you can claim that there is a moral dynamic which directs that the status quo be changed because it currently violates supposedly inviolable rights.

    That was the moral dynamic that gained much international support and sympathy for the nationalists in NI when they formerly claimed that the Unionist Veto (now rebranded post-GFA as the PoC and elevated to the status of a principle, no less) violated their right to national self-determination to live as a part of the Irish nation in an Irish nation-state. Unfortunately for them (and to the bafflement of international sympathizers), they repudiated their own right to self-determination (trading it in for a right to self-determination as part of NI) and seem quite keen that the citizens of the Republic of Ireland should also follow their post-nationalist (or, at any rate, bi-nationalist) example and repudiate their own right to self-determination, dismantling their beloved nation-state and replacing it with a replica of Northern Ireland.

    Well, because you now have an aspiration and no longer a right, there is no longer any moral obligation on others to facilitate your unity desire. You might have a right to life but you have an aspiration to own a Bentley. In short, if you want one, earn it yourself. The onus is now on you to show why your desire for unity is to the benefit of others, not simply to your own benefit. Good luck with that.

  • Dave

    If that is too obscure: it’s not about sectarian headcounts, it’s about persuading people that the status quo needs to be radically altered. That confers an immense advantage on Unionists because the status quo is unionism by default, whereas nationalists who are not convinced that changing the status quo is advantageous to them will becomes unionists by default. For a practical example: a nationalist who works for a multinational company that located in NI because it is part of the UK will not vote himself out of a job by voting NI out of the UK. If that is too obscure: it’s not about sectarian headcounts, it’s about persuading people that the status quo needs to be radically altered. That confers an immense advantage on Unionists because the status quo is unionism by default, whereas nationalists who are not convinced that changing the status quo is advantageous to them will becomes unionists by default. For a practical example: a nationalist who works for a multinational company that located in NI because it is part of the UK will not vote himself out of a job by voting NI out of the UK. It’s post-sectarian game, so adjust your gameplan or lose, kids.

  • Dave

    Whoops… double paste.

  • It was Sammy Mc Nally what done it

    Dave,

    “they repudiated their own right to self-determination (trading it in for a right to self-determination as part of NI)”

    Ireland’s right to self-determination is now recognised by UK and Ireland as enshrined in the GFA. Ireland traded the useless articles 2 & 3 for the ‘title deeds of the Union’ the Government of Ireland Act. The principle of consent now works both ways (it previously only worked in Unionists favour). The consent of the ROI is now required to change the GFA. Consent now resides in Ireland (North and South )with Britain having agreed to sideline itself from the equation.

  • runciter

    Kids, etc

    Getting a straight answer from you is next to impossible.

  • Mack

    Dave – “For a practical example: a nationalist who works for a multinational company that located in NI because it is part of the UK will not vote himself out of a job by voting NI out of the UK”

    Practical realities – s/he wouldn’t be voting themselves out of a job. Wages would stay at the same level, personal taxes would be lower, the company would have to pay less tax to pay the same wage & would have much reduced tax on it’s profits. With IDA grants (and they’ve been much more successful in attracting FDI than the IDB) it’s possible said multi-national might expand creating promotion posibilities for it’s employees. If they did, aforementioned IDA may well be able attract better replacement multi-nationals given the lower wage structure in the north coupled with the more attractive tax structure present in Ireland (Republic).

    Now why would anyone vote against that?

    Do parents not want good jobs for their children? Or do all NI parents want their kids to work as AOs in the civil service and in call centres?

    You make valid points about power being entrenched in the establishment, but a United Ireland is a transfer of sovereignty – nothing more. Those power bases need not be dismantled….

  • Mack

    Should read

    “Even if they did not, aforementioned IDA may well be able attract better replacement multi-nationals given the lower wage structure in the north coupled with the more attractive tax structure present in Ireland (Republic). “

  • Nomad

    runciter,

    Let’s make it as simple as you’re trying to make it, and it is pretty simple:

    Cost-benefit to whom? Voters in NI and ROI
    Analysed by whom? Voters in NI and ROI
    Measured in what units? What they believe will change in their lives happen if the status quo changes (Clue- I’d start reminding people of the benefits of a United Ireland- try arguing it would create long run lower taxes and a more enfranchised vote for NI citizens.)

    Getting a straight answer from you is next to impossible.

    Based on this exchange you don’t seem to be able to synthesise a reasonable explanation for yourself too well.