“It is now accepted this is unlikely to happen..”

RTÉ reports confirmation that the Prime Minister, Gordon Brown, and the Taoiseach, Bertie Ahern, will use the opportunity in Manchester next week to hold talks on a number of issues. Among the items listed in the report

They will discuss the devolution of justice and policing powers from Westminster to the North. It is now accepted this is unlikely to happen by the target date of May 2008.

Although, it’s also worth noting that not everyone will publicly acknowledge that acceptance.. despite the evidence. Perhaps something for the next Londonderry meeting to discuss?Of course, if there’s time, they might also want to continue that non-public conversation on the future for the Common Travel Area and how the new e-border controls fit in..

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  • joeCanuck

    That is such a pity. It means that responsibility will continue to reside with the unprincipled appeasers and protectors of the gangsters.

  • The Third Policeman

    Ah but sure Joe with the sterling work they’re doing protecting the Orange halls its no wonder the DUP don’t want to take it away from them!

  • BonarLaw

    The Third Policema

    with respect, your 8.33 post just shows how far from reality some people are when talking about policing and justice devolution. Do you really expect the Minister to pick up the phone to the Chief Con and tell him to deploy outside a given hall on a given evening? Ever heard of operational independence?

  • “Ever heard of operational independence?”

    Yes. Apparently it’s a fiction!!

  • kensei

    BL

    “with respect, your 8.33 post just shows how far from reality some people are when talking about policing and justice devolution. Do you really expect the Minister to pick up the phone to the Chief Con and tell him to deploy outside a given hall on a given evening? Ever heard of operational independence?”

    You think a minster can’t set priorities, or give the Chief Constable the hair dryer treatment if they aren’t being met?

  • lib2016

    There’s an excellent book (Penguin) by the Sunday Times Insight team when that meant something i.e. pre-Murdoch. It’s called ‘Beating the Terrorist’ and is an exposé of the coverup of the torture, mainly in Castlereagh, in the middle and late 1970’s.

    What it makes quite clear is that the division of police duties into policy and operational sectors is merely a device enabling both politicans and police to avoid taking responsibility. Either a police service is accountable to the public through their politicans or it is not.