A Life Less Ordinary

Tim Brannigan’s life story to date certainly makes fascinating reading. From the ‘elaborate, tearful lie’ (his words) that concealed his conception and birth to growing up a black man in Belfast in the 1970s/80s to his time as a republican prisoner in the 1990s and beyond, Brannigan’s life is one being retold as part of a BBC Radio 4 series entitled ‘It’s My Story.’

  • Harry Flashman

    *Harry- my post @ 09:34 AM on the first page. I have a book by George Rosie titled Curious Scotland that states they did exist. I have read it in other works of non-fiction also. Are you seriously suggesting because there is no photographic evidence that they didn’t exist? C’mon!*

    Eoghan, that Irish people suffered discrimination is not in dispute, but this “No Blacks No Dogs No Irish” sign is the subject of my point.

    1950’s and 60’s Britain was a period of huge societal change and most of that change was led by progressive journalists and political campaigners, think of Lord Longford and Roy Hatersley and that other bloke, a methodist I think whose name escapes me ( he famously described 1960’s Belfast as a city of religious nightclubs, can anyone help me out?). They were backed up by the BBC and the then Manchester Guardian in their very public and very succesful campaigns to liberalise British society.

    It is my contention that if the “NBNDNI” signs were as prolific as Irish emigrants to Britain claim (emigrants by the way who seem to have done very well and settled rather comfortably into such an allegedly bigoted society) then there would be a vast bulk of photographic evidence of them as opposed to the “my da knew a bloke who says he met someone who heard of a mate who saw it” anecdotes so far produced.

    Tell me this, where did all the Blacks, Irish and dogs stay if these signs were as common as alleged?

    It is my contention that, as Dewi points out, it is merely an extension of the NINA myth from the US.

  • The Dubliner

    “Great analogy! Only thing is no-one is denying that the IRA were involved in sectarian murders. I won’t re-tread my argument about defining campaigns as I am sure you know it off by heart. Going by your narrative then the Republic was borne out of Prod blood, and your beloved FF are complicit in their subsequent ethnic cleansing.” – PE

    There isn’t any comparison between the War of Independence in the south and the sectarian squabble in the north. The nationalists in the south were denied the principle of self-determination, being ruled by a foreign power against the will of the majority. The solution was simple: eject the foreign power. That, dear child, is the stuff of legitimate rebellion. In the north, nationalists were the minority who were not deprived of the principle of self-determination. Notice the two crucial differences? Here’s a couple more: Northern Ireland was created out of the fag end of the War of Independence in the south in order to avoid a sectarian civil war involving armed Protestants. That was the new dispensation which meant that militant republicanism ended when the state of NI was created. There were no more ‘eject the British’ solutions, since the British were the Unionist majority within the state, and the withdrawal of the British government would not have led to unity but to a violent sectarian conflagration. Another spammer in the works for the Shinners was how to stitch the south and the north together assuming the British government withdrew and there were any Shinners left standing after said conflagration, since the south wouldn’t have touched the north with a 90-mile bargepole. Shinners, being slow learners, finally copped that on. Still, you don’t need an endgame if all you really want to do is play ‘rebel without a clue’ to impress your friends, do you? 😉

    And it’s not a case of Shinners simply being “involved in sectarian murders” – although it is very gracious of you to concede the transgression. It is a case of them being sectarian murderers. You are what you do, kid. Militant nationalism is purely sectarian.

  • Rory

    Great! 103 posts many of them attacking the subject, Tim Brannigan and what it is imagined he ,might have said on this programme and whatt philosophy he might hold, what his views on his life and community are and all of them widely wrong of the mark.

    But this might simply have been demonstrated by simply listening to the programme but that it seems was too much effort and besides might get in the way of one’s preconceptions.

    It is heart-warming to see that the traditional practice of comment on Slugger continues without interference from any reference to the material under discussion.

  • The Dubliner

    Rory, posting on a thread just to attack others for not sticking to its topic is itself an example of not sticking to the thread’s topic.

    He told his story. It wasn’t very interesting. It would have been interesting if he was asked to explain what impact the racial abuse he expereinced from British army patrols on his decision to become involved in organised murder, and if he felt that engaging in such attacks was an appropriate response. It seems he has the same racist trait of his abusers in failing to distinguish between all and some, in that those whose murders he facilated the murder of were British but were not the ones who abused him. Wasted opportunity, perhaps.

  • lib2016

    Taken along with the recent emergence into the public view of at least one Protestant GAA player in the North there does seem to be a slight ray of hope for society here.

    Irish republicanism will eventually take over the mainstream here as it has in the rest of Ireland and it´s nice to see that it´s up for the challenge.

    We need our minorities – even what´s left of unionism. Not so much for what they have to contribute but for what their children will contribute. We need inclusivity.

  • Comrade Stalin

    The nationalists in the south were denied the principle of self-determination, being ruled by a foreign power against the will of the majority.

    Considering that Sinn Fein never won a majority of the votes cast prior to independence, I always find this claim somewhat tenuous.

  • lib5050

    lib

    “Irish republicanism will eventually take over the mainstream here as it has in the rest of Ireland and it´s nice to see that it´s up for the challenge.”

    You poor deluded fool.

  • lib2016

    lib5050,

    Just watch the way the difference in voting totals has been moving for decades…it doesn´t take an Einstein to work out what´s happening.

    We can argue about why – an aging unionist population, personnel moving to Britain to follow their security jobs, the youth getting their education abroad and staying there, but there´s no valid argument about which direction the numbers are moving in.

  • Dewi

    “Considering that Sinn Fein never won a majority of the votes cast prior to independence, I always find this claim somewhat tenuous. ”

    You are usually quite rational but this is nonsense. Overwhelming majority in 1919 = only not over half cos of Sinn Fein candidates being returned without opposition.

  • confused

    The 1919 election was by no means free.
    Unionist candidates were murdered in front of their families and through intimidation members of other parties did not stand against SF.

  • Reader

    Dewi: Overwhelming majority in 1919 = only not over half cos of Sinn Fein candidates being returned without opposition.
    I expect you are going on an estimate from somewhere – but the term ‘overwhelming’ – could you define what *you* mean by it? Then, was there a ‘overwhelming’ unionist majority in Northern Ireland at partition, using the same definition?

  • Reader

    RG Cuan: Written on the urinals are the names of those Anglo landlords who instigated the Highland Clearances. You have to piss on them!
    That’s racist double standards – what about the Scottish landlords who did exactly the same thing?

  • Dewi

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_(UK)_general_election,_1918

    Nick Whyte is off so can’t confirm. But fairly conclusive reader – and yes there was a unionist majority in the six counties – your point ?

  • Turgon

    lib 2016
    “We need our minorities – even what´s left of unionism. Not so much for what they have to contribute but for what their children will contribute. We need inclusivity.”

    Lib this is about your standard. Insulting unionists at the same time as being condescending and feigning some pseudo kindness. What do you want my children to contribute? From your level of arrogance I wonder if it is to sweep your chimneys.

    All your posts seem to centre around three things

    1) It was all the Brits fault, which is modified to unionists as well.

    2) We nationalists are winning.

    3) unionism is falling apart.

    All of the above is promulgated in a remarkably high handed and insulting fashion.

    Has it ever occurred to you that actually your posts are extremely off putting to unionists? I have a feeling you do not care though.

    Since liberation is only 9 years away have you any thoughts about accommodating unionists in your united Ireland Niavarna? I must admit that some nationalists and republicans can make a decent fist of proposing a united Ireland in a relatively non threatening fashion. You are certainly not one of them.

    I do wonder what age you are. Who knows by 2016 you may have learned some subtlety and maturity. That may be more valuable to you than a united Ireland.

  • PeaceandJustice

    “While I was home alone one evening, two IRA men knocked on the door. They were looking to leave some weapons on our property overnight before moving them on.”

    An innocent victim. We believe you. Yeah right! Nice try from a SF IRA supporting terrorist.

  • Dewi

    Turgon – you need to reach out as well you know. Republicans brought the war to an end – and it was not easy. Might be an idea to engage not abuse…(and I’ll admire Elenwe from afar so no need to worry )

  • PeaceandJustice

    Dewi – “Republicans brought the war to an end – and it was not easy.”
    Yes, I’m sure it wasn’t easy. Once you get the thirst for murdering people it must be difficult to stop. But we must thank them. We are so grateful. They are heros. As victims we must thank our abusers for stopping.

    Wise up Dewi!

  • Comrade Stalin

    Dewi:

    You are usually quite rational but this is nonsense. Overwhelming majority in 1919 = only not over half cos of Sinn Fein candidates being returned without opposition.

    They got well over half the candidates, but they didn’t get a majority of the votes cast, and that’s thanks to the stupid STV electoral system – if the current electoral system being used in Ireland were used at that time, SF would have had significantly less seats.

    Leaving aside the matter of intimidation of prospective candidates, my point is that the claim that SF spoke for the overwhelming majority of the country is a tenuous one. They won the election by the rules laid down, yes – but they didn’t win the majority of the vote. This is a very important point – Irish republicanism is a concept which has a history of ignoring the expressed will of the Irish people. In every plebiscite since 1921 (the election immediately following the Treaty) armed republicanism has ignored the will of the Irish electorate, citing the 1918 general election – ignoring the small detail that during that election (run by the British under bent Briitsh rules) they didn’t even win a majority of the votes cast.

  • Comrade Stalin

    that’s thanks to the stupid STV electoral system

    Duh. Asleep at the wheel, I’m afraid. Stupid FPTP electoral system, I meant.

  • Dewi

    Joseph – 1918 – sorry I said 1919 – there is no doubt that if elections were held in every constituency Sinn Fein would have won majority of the vote. Don’t know if it’s important today though.

  • Dewi

    “Yes, I’m sure it wasn’t easy. Once you get the thirst for murdering people it must be difficult to stop. But we must thank them. We are so grateful. They are heros. As victims we must thank our abusers for stopping. ”

    It is difficult to stop. And it is difficult to keep stopped.

  • PeaceandJustice

    Dewi – “It is difficult to stop. And it is difficult to keep stopped.”

    Is that the voice of the angel of death?

  • Dewi

    Is that the voice of the angel of death?

    It ain’t a good place to start from. where do u suggest we go ?

  • Rory

    Why is it that some (the Dubliner above as a good example) seem to think that Tim Brannigan should define himself only by the colour of his skin. Whatever indignities he may have suffered from the British Army and RUC as a resident of Beechmount were because of his being a nationalist youth in a nationalist area.

    In the face of that immediate affront it is a bit rich for a white Dubliner to demand that his priority ought to have been black civil rights. Rather like demanding that the priority of some black youth named Murphy in 1960’s Mississipi ought to have been gerrymandering in Derry.

    No wonder the heartfelt cry of the oppressed, throughout the last two centuries at least, has been, ” God help us in our struggle but above all, Lord, please spare us from the kindness of liberals”.

  • Diluted Orange

    How touching, a black IRA man. If he wasn’t black who would actually give a toss about the life story of this low-life?

    Stay tuned for next week’s installment of ‘Ethnic Minority Terrorists’ …

    We will be treated to the life story of Ihab and Andre Shoukri, everyone’s favorite 2 Egyptian loyalist ‘rogues’, who regrettably found themselves on the wrong side of the tracks – the cheeky scamps.

  • Garibaldy

    On 1918, this came up before, and if I recall correctly Nicholas Whyte estimated that had the non-contested seats – around 25% been contested – then the vote for SF would have been at least 57%. So that’s nearly 60% as a minimum. Well past the simple majority it would take to change the consitutional arrangements of NI today, and a clear majority by any standards. The argument about less than half the vote is simply playing games with numbers, and lacks credibility.
    I don’t want to get into another extended discussion of this but this is one case of statistics being utterly inadequate to explain historical developments.

  • Sean

    If you actually listened to the broadcast you would have heard a man who made no excuses for his life. He was a member of SF and some members asked if he could store some weapons on a dark night, he agreed and he makes no bones about it but he agreed to store 2 rifles and the IRA left much more. He went to jail to save his mother because he knew he was at fault and he wouldnt allow his family to pay his debts.

    I take it from listening tht he did not actully join the IRA till after he was in the H-block. He simply explains that his life was lead in directions he did not intend because of both his race and his political leanings. Not once did i hear him trying to excuse his actions based on his beliefs, he just allowed that was what happened and he dealt with it.

    As for his faher who seduced a married woman and then abandoned her, that is hardly a narative unique to the black populace. The darkest depths of my life included the seduction of a married woman whom i had impregnated and the only thing that is different between me nd his father is that she miscarried. In my own defence I can only offer that she did conceal it from me and did not want e to interfere in her life. My great shame is that I listened. I should have done anything but what I did. And I am sure his father regrets his actions as much as I do.

  • PeaceandJustice

    “Is that the voice of the angel of death?”
    Well Dewi, how about the ‘angel of death’ of SF IRA giving a sincere apology to all those people it murdered, tortured, injured … to the relatives left behind … the UDR/RIR/RUC widows … the innocent Roman Catholic shop assistants who sold sweets to the Security forces … the children left behind without fathers and mothers … all because of the ‘angel of death’ called Sinn Fein IRA.

  • Dewi

    PeaceandJustice – I agree with you actually, such an apology would be useful – do u think the IRA are ready to do it ?

  • Comrade Stalin

    Joseph – 1918 – sorry I said 1919 – there is no doubt that if elections were held in every constituency Sinn Fein would have won majority of the vote.

    There is room for reasonable doubt, which is significant given what this election was used to justify.

    Sean:

    He was a member of SF ..
    I take it from listening tht he did not actully join the IRA till after he was in the H-block.

    Brannigan at no time said that he was a member of either SF or the IRA. He said he was asked to store some weapons. My interpretation of that was that he complied for the same reasons that most people would do at the time, whether they had sympathies with the IRA or not.

    PeaceAndJustice, would you for christ’s sake change the record. People with a Catholic background were just as likely to be IRA victims, and in many ways Mr Brannigan was one such.

  • Dewi

    “There is room for reasonable doubt, which is significant given what this election was used to justify”

    There are many issues where there is reasonable doubt but not this one. If elections had been held in every constituency Sinn Fein would have won a majority of the vote.

  • The Dubliner

    “Why is it that some (the Dubliner above as a good example) seem to think that Tim Brannigan should define himself only by the colour of his skin.” – Rory

    Excuse me? If you wish to attribute racist sentiments to me, then do so because they are written by me and not because your fairground powers of mindreading projects, no doubt, your own dismal disposition onto others. I’ll thank you not to tell lies in your shabby attempt at character assassination.

    “The nationalists in the south were denied the principle of self-determination, being ruled by a foreign power against the will of the majority.” – The Dubliner

    “Considering that Sinn Fein never won a majority of the votes cast prior to independence, I always find this claim somewhat tenuous.” – Comrade Stalin

    Did the people of Ireland have that right before the War of Independence? No. Did they even have a national parliament? No. What do you think self-determination means? It is stated in the first article of the UN’s International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights as “All peoples have the right of self-determination. By virtue of that right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development.” As that definition didn’t exist in 1916, here is how the Irish Proclamation of Independence stated it: “We declare the right of the people of Ireland to the ownership of Ireland, and to the unfettered control of Irish destinies, to be sovereign and indefeasible. The long usurpation of that right by a foreign people and government has not extinguished the right, nor can it ever be extinguished except by the destruction of the Irish people.” That right in inalienable, meaning it is a birthright of every citizen that is not subject to the discretion of any other authority. It is certainly not subject to a referendum, as aggressive occupying powers tend not to allow referendums that are designed to render their authority null and void, leaving force (and the right to use force to assert a claim to self-determination) as the legitimate option to eject the foreign power. Go figure! I wouldn’t condemn any national movement using force to assert that right in the absence of an alternative means.

    On a point of principle, I couldn’t condemn anyone for using force to assert a right that is inalienable. To do so is to render the principle of self-determination as meaningless when an occupying power denies it. It isn’t, however, a right to kill at the sole discretion of the asserter. It must be subject to sanity and other factors. Self-determination, however, is not the same thing as independence. It is possible for a country to have self-determination but not to have independence. Indeed, Ireland didn’t sever its ties to the British monarch and become a Republic until 1949, 27-years after partition. Northern Ireland was granted self-determination at the same time as the south. It had its own national parliament to determine its own affairs – it even had a Government of Ireland Act, 1920 that prevented that parliament from introducing any law which discriminated of religious grounds, either positively or negatively.

    This is a very grey area in relation to Northern Ireland, since the Shinners deliberately blurred the distinction between independence and self-determination and the fundamentally changed context of an un-partitioned Ireland and a partitioned one. The problem with the Shinners is that they attached a value to British life of zero. So, they went on a killing spree with absolutely no plan or endgame for how they would achieve independence – and it is independence, not self-determination that they were after. If you decide to kill people to obtain an objective, you should have a reasonable prospect of the objective being obtainable in order to avoid what would amount to senseless violence that will never be validated by realisation of the objective. The Shinners had no prospect whatsoever of obtaining their stated objective via their chosen means. It hardly needs to be stated that these people are moral degenerate sociopaths when the evidence is so utterly overwhelming.

  • Prince Eoghan

    Dub

    Sorry but this militant sectarian child/kid was on the bevvy yesterday celebrating the tic getting a good result, anyway. Your post @ 03:45 PM yesterday is really quite a good story if it is/was your desire to justify dividing your country at the point of a gun. A Republican? Aye ye might have slept wi wan!

    >>The problem with the Shinners is that they attached a value to British life of zero. So, they went on a killing spree<< LOL. Ye couldnae make it up, wait a minute you do. How things change Dub eh?

  • Dewi

    PE – why is it (S)eltic not (C)eltic by the way – always annoyed me – any idea ?

  • Prince Eoghan

    It was to be pronounced Keltic, at least that was the original intention of Brother Walfrid late of my old school Sacred Heart in Bridgeton. He desired that Celtic would be a cultural bridge for all Celts. Alas the dafter Glesga keelies had difficulty remembering to pronounce the K, and the rest they say is(if ye know the) history.

    BTW After this past week, for the first time in over a year I am enjoying watching Celtic. Probably too late to get a refund for those Gretna season tickets that I bought for mysel and the weans.

  • Dewi

    While we are at it what’s the difference between a bairn and a wean ?

  • Prince Eoghan

    Nane! All depends if ye are in Glesga or mixing with yokels. Did you get my e-mail reply?

  • PeaceandJustice

    Dewi – “I agree with you actually, such an apology would be useful – do u think the IRA are ready to do it?”
    It would appear not. After all SF IRA leader Martin McGuinness says he is very very proud of the SF IRA death squads. On a human level, the lack of an apology remains a great point of hurt for the victims i.e. why should the Bogside Butcher be DFM with a position of authority over his victims – when he believes the hurt he caused both Protestants and Roman Catholics is something he is very very proud of?

    Comrade Stalin – “would you … change the record.”
    The truth is hard to take Comrade Stalin. And the record will not be changing until we get justice.

  • Dewi

    PE – Yes – just don’t bring your guitar indeed !

  • Dewi

    P&J – it’s the type of language that you and others use that’s probably part of the reason an apology has not been forthcoming. “Bogside Butcher”, “SF IRA death squads” etc. If an apology was forthcoming would u celebrate with a bonfire ?
    I know that’s provocative but tension reduction requires efforts by all.

  • Prince Eoghan

    Dewi

    Wonder why these guys are so one dimensional in their pursuit of alleged terrorists. I mean why not the FM as well as the DFM?

    Might not fit your guitar into Bairds bar, nothing to do with your singing. Honest!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • The Dubliner

    “Your post @ 03:45 PM yesterday is really quite a good story if it is/was your desire to justify dividing your country at the point of a gun. A Republican?” – Prince Eoghan

    A republican would not have murdered his fellow protestant countrymen in a bloody civil war. That is why the island was partitioned and it is why the south never attacked it. A militant nationalist, on the other hand, would do exactly that. Partition put the genie of sectarian civil war between protestant and catholic back into its bottle. The militant nationalists in the north did their best to release that genie again and the sectarian bloodbath that true Irish republicans averted.

    “Ye couldnae make it up, wait a minute you do.” – Prince Eoghan

    Explain to me how killing thousands of people and maiming thousands indicates anything other than attaching zero value to life. If you kill for some purpose, then you must be sure that your purpose is obtainable in order to justify the loss of life, mustn’t you? To do otherwise is to attach no value to life.

    So enlighten me, sweet prince, as to what exactly the plan was? I won’t even ask you to find an equivalent “principle of independence” that might serve as token justification for their senseless sectarian murder campaign in the absence of the principle of self-determination. I’ll apply a purely ‘end justifies the means’ criteria.

    They seemed to have copped on to its absence, but are still insisting, it seems, that it was present and that, ergo, their sectarian murder campaign wasn’t senseless even if it remains sectarian.

    So, what was their practicable plan and endgame? Why do you think their murder campaign could have achieved independence? It you can’t answer, I’m afraid I’ll have no alternative to dismiss further uttereances from you on the subject as a case of talking out of where you normally wipe.

  • Prince Eoghan

    >>talking out of where you normally wipe.< < You do enough of that for the both of us Dub! Again in your first para you are further making the British case for dividing your country, well done! >>A republican would not have murdered his fellow protestant countrymen in a bloody civil war.< < Cork?? Shameful things happened not just in the north. >>Explain to me how killing thousands of people and maiming thousands indicates anything other than attaching zero value to life. If you kill for some purpose, then you must be sure that your purpose is obtainable in order to justify the loss of life, mustn’t you? To do otherwise is to attach no value to life.<< Oh to have a crystal ball like you Dub. Or more likely pontificating from a throne built on hypocrisy. Was it the policing issue that finally gave you this aneurysm on the armed struggle, I seem to recall that you were a supporter before that. Look theoretically we can talk shite all day long(you are improving in that regard) but it is the people in the 6 counties that have to live with the day to day repercussions of the decisions THEY make. Right or wrong SF found a way out of the mire. It is not classic Republicanism, but there you are. I admit that perhaps I do not have the intellectual capacity to work out your saul/King Billy conversion on the road to Damascus. The manner of the change is startling in itself, however the Stockholm like length to which your thinking has altered is spooky. Your obvious hatred of SF apart. Please enlighten me.

  • lib2016

    It is terribly helpful of our unionist friends to point out that Sinn Fein is insufficiently socialist because they accepted the democratically elected government´s right to insist on public/private financing and insufficently republican because they were willing to compromise in order to do a deal with the rest of the people who live on this island.

    Don´t see many republicans complaining though and maybe one should ask why.

    As Molyneaux said at the time the Ceasefire was the most destabilising event in Northern Ireland´s short history.

    Unionism has already become so discreditied that seemingly the only meaningful criticism of Sinn Fein can come from a ´republican´perspective, whether real or adopted.

  • páid

    Six pages about this ‘black’ man.

    Must get this screen checked out……….

  • The Dubliner

    >>talking out of where you normally wipe.< < You do enough of that for the both of us Dub!

    Actually, I apologise for that remark. The Scots have yet to learn such elementary social graces from their colonial masters. 😉

  • Prince Eoghan

    Dub

    No need to apologise to me, water off a duck’s back and all that ;¬) I would love it though if you got around to explaining to me the bit I find offensive. Namely the sea-change on the IRA, the SF bit I understand. And you used to make me laugh, what happened to that? or were you just an unconscious comedian aman Cara.

  • The Dubliner

    PE, I already explained it. I assumed you ignored it for your own propaganda purposes. Page 3, post 6, Aug 13, 2007:

    “Actually, I didn’t vote, as I lived in America at the time. I would have voted ‘Yes’ because all of the right people (i.e. Clinton and prominent nationalists) were calling for a ‘yes’ vote. I was hopelessly ill-informed about the reality of “The Troubles” in Northern Ireland, thanks to Tim Pat Coogan and general disinterest on my part, so I didn’t have any of the concerns that arose later. I held a very simplistic view to the effect that Unionists were unmitigated bigots who despised all things Irish and that the IRA were basically the good guys who had defended the nationalists from severe abuse of their human rights, but who were now trying, against the odds, to create the conditions for peace with the enemy while Perfidious Albion was trying to deny the nationalists the right to choose their own political representatives, putting endless pre-conditions and stumbling blocks in their path. It was only when I decided to move back to Ireland that I took an interest in the place again, visiting Irish sites, happening upon United Irelander, Balrog, Slugger, et al, finding good journalists and writers about the north, that I began to ‘catch a clue’ – as the Northerners say!”

    I think I’ve explained exactly why I changed my mind, since I have stated exactly what my objections are countless times on Slugger. You don’t listen. You justify random and wantom murder without any valid rationale or moral criteria. You remind me of what a teacher once said to me: “You’ll go through life never learning anything because you know it all already.”

    And it’s not really a case of changing one’s mind, since I knew as little about the issues involved then as you do now. (Gets dig in). I’m just thankful that my ignorance of the nature of the violence NI did no harm way back then.

  • Dewi

    Dub – PE’s right about the funny bit though. You always had the best lines. What’s up ?