Miss Fitz’s twelfth

Having read Fair Deal’s ‘brief’ account of his 12th day, I was prompted to counter with mine. One of the true values of Slugger is this ability to allow contrasting views, so I shall be as honest and forthright as he was. I was out at bonfires last night, and went to bed about 2 o’clock this morning. When the alarm rang at 7am, I was very inclined to remain in bed or at the very least plead death. But I forced myself up and found my cleanest dirty shirt to put on. I walked the dog on the beach in Rostrevor, and left the village that had little idea of what the day means to so many others. I sped to Belfast, praying that the PSNI were otherwise engaged and arrived in East Belfast.

For the past 7 years, I have observed and monitored parades in Northern Ireland. My views on this site are personal reflections, and do not in any way reflect on any public body or group.

The Short Strand and Newtownards Road area were relatively quiet, and I noticed several things. For one, there was a lot less alcohol on the ground. This was different to years gone by when you would see dozens of people drunk and drinking at 8 am. That was not the case this year. I popped into St Matthews first, not for anything political, they have a very handy loo that I avail of quite frequently. The Peelers were out in force, and had new ‘screens’ to shield one side looking at the other. They resembled shower curtains, but I was told they cost fortunes. Another thing I noticed, and not jus there, was the lack of UVF flags in general. The majority of flags were Union and Ulster, and it looks and feels a whole lot better. Please keep it up.

The Parade set off in good time, and by the time it came around to the Short Strand, a large crowd had gathered. There was a small protest group, international observers and observers from other organisations. I believe the Oversight Commision may also have popped by.

Not everyone will be happy with any parade, and in my position you have to be able to listen and sympathise with all of the grievances, no matter how small or large you secretly feel they might be. All other things aside, it was a good parade and it felt like all sides had made good efforts.

My colleagues and I retired to the Holiday Inn for coffee and croissants, and a good chat about the morning. Home for a couple of hours, with a bit of laundry and cooking to be done! Back to Belfast for 5 pm, and watch the parade coming back to Shaftesbury Square. In my opinion, it was a much smaller crowd this year, although the same amount of drink and yobbery.

In the Short Strand for 6.30, and a long wait until all were back at 7.30. Good police operation, and overall a good return. Full marks to everyone who contributed on each side to ensure a peaceful and trouble free return.

Home at 10pm, to a Chinese and a bottle of wine.

Fair Deal does the marching and I do the watching. No one is ever fully satisfied, but there is reason to hope that we can all co-exist happily and peacefully. There is still work to be done, but I was very impressed this year at the level of commitment from all sides. Perhaps better times really do lay ahead.

  • Dewi

    At least it was briefer than FDs !! – although I suspect u enjoyed your Chinese and bottle of wine more than the rest of the day.

  • Miss Fitz

    Yes Dewi, I started to lose the will the live half way through the account.

    I enjoyed the day, but I do honestly long for a whole lot of mutual respect to fall upon us.

    The bottle has gone down well………..

  • Reminds me of the Charlie Chaplin movie The Great dictaror where the (Jewish) Chaplin goes to watch the KAT burners.
    At least the dog’s owner knows how to treat a Rangers shirt with the contempt it belongs.

  • Rory

    “it was a much smaller crowd this year, although the same amount of drink and yobbery”

    That’s wonderful, Miss Fitz. A smaller bunch of yahoos – yet able to create just as much revulsion as a previously greater number. It is as if the cultural underpinning of the post-Soviet economic dispensation has finally imbedded itself in the “Ulster” psyche with this new dynamic outburst of a leaner, meaner production of traditional Orange viciousness.

    Karl Popper would have been so pleased. Unfortunately the ould bugger is past pleasing –
    rather proving Marx’s most acute observation that matter comes before mind. Popper no longer minds.

    And, as Orangeism stutters out on its final desperate death spasms, neither should we.

  • IQHQ

    Miss Fitz

    Great account. I know that you are not one to shy away from speaking harsh words when they are due (I used to be called “Resolve” on here, you may remember me).

    It’s so satisfying to hear your optimism. Let’s hope that it’s well-placed!

  • Thanks for that Miss Fitz. It was good to hear an objective account of an actual eye-witness instead of the usual bigotted knee-jerkery from the usual uninformed suspects.

  • owen

    Nice photo of Andy Goram in the Rangers Top.

  • Miss Fitz,

    I am not sure that your summary was quite the radically different summary to FD’s account, that perhaps you initially promised.

    I was working yesterday and at lunchtime popped out just after the main parade had passed through the city centre.

    There were 2 things that struck me:

    Firstly, many tourists wandering aimlessly around witha bsolutely nothing to do. Every single shop closed. No attractions open. A surreal feeling for them I’m sure. If Belfast truly wants to become an international destination, then the city is going to have think long and hard about how we look after our tourists. Public holiday or not, we cannot leave thousands of tourists without a single convenience open. Either we are a proper city or we are’nt…

    Secondly, there were so many women pushing prams with young children in tow and many of these women were absolutely plastered. It was a shocking sight. One lady (approx 35) actually fell over in front of The City Hall as her little daughter looked on.

    I am not sure what opinion many of the tourists formed about this place from those sights, but they were possibly less than impressed i would guess…

  • darth rumsfeld

    Oh catch a grip.

    Imagine the scene chez macswiney next year
    “Yah, we went to Rio during Mardi Gras, and all the shops were shut. How awful is that?”

    Hint- anyone who comes to Belfast in the week of the 12th is not going to be catered for as we’re doing our own thing for ourselves. The fact that it involves such a large section of the population naturally impinges on the running of many parts of the province.
    You can come along and spectate as a tourist, or go up the Mournes or to the Giant Causeway for a day. You haven’t read your Lonely Planet or talked to your tour guide if you thought it was a normal day.

    Your second point is , sadly, quite justified. The level of drunkeness at parades seems to have been marginally less yesterday, but was still far too much. The tough stance of the police was non-existent-quelle surprise.

    At my parade there was a group drinking right in front of the platform, disrupting the event, and they were watched by two stolid policemen who were placed to protect Willie McCrea from (non-existent) hecklers, and thus weren’t prepared to intervene. The four culprits had their drink poured out and were marched off by one Orange steward. What exactly do we pay the police for again?

  • JC

    Es cosa nostra?

  • Miss Fitz

    Darth
    To be fair, I found there were more shops than ever open this year, and I was interested to hear on the news this morning that the larger chains are quite perturbed at the loss of business and considering opening next year. I would welcome that.

    I think Mac makes a fair point about my account, but I was trying to give a flavour of the day without neccesarily giving an opinion. I try to remain as neutral as possible, although it is tough!

    My only opinion is that people have a right to express their culture and heritage. They have a right to parade. That right has to be balanced with the right of individuals who do not share that heritage not to be unduly oppressed or offended by the expression of said culture.

    My photos sometimes express what I dont put into words. There was one shot I didnt take of a husband and wife drinking out of a bottle of Buckfast, and then resting it back in their child’s stroller.

    I still feel more than a little intimidated at parades. I often look around and think, Crikey: I bet I’m the only Catholic for miles!!

    Having said all of that, I stick by my assertion that things are improving, and I welcome the reduction of the very threatening paramilitary paraphenalia.

    Drink is a problem that both sides of the community share. When I was involved in the Fiddlers Green Festival in Rostrevor, it was one of our enduring problems. Drunken youths, broken bottles and random violence. That is a social problem and the responsibility of us all

  • Darth,

    I accept your point about lack of policing , but surely there is also a huge degree of self-responsibilty required from some of the individuals who are drinking? We cannot excuse from that responsibilty surely?

    If it’s a 17 or 18 year-old teenager, then it’s not going to be easy to stop them and I accept that fully. However if its a mother of 3 kids who is staggering along with the nippers in tow, then surely thats a bit different?

    Drinking on the streets is a huge problem in both Nationalist and Loyalist areas of the city and we seem to have allowed a culture to emerge where this behaviour has been tolerated for far too long.

    I would still also stick to my point about the city centre. No matter what parades or carnivals take place in most other cities, there are always still some shops and restaurants open. There wasnt even a newsagent where someone could buy a bottle of coke or a paper. I still think collectively we must do more on ocacsions like this to better cater for our visitors from abroad.

  • Miss Fitz,

    I was’nt dismissing your account by any means and I enjoyed reading it, but I do think that a truly opposite perspective to FD’s account might have maybe included some account of what it’s like for residents who live in the shadow of such parades and are virtually caged in for a day, while they parade out and back in the evening.

    Thanks for your contribution, but I dont necessarily think that the good journalism must always be strictly objective and impartial. Life itself is not always so balanced, after all…?

  • Miss Fitz

    Mac
    As you know, I am not a journalist, and I have responsibilities beyond Slugger that I feel limit the kind of opinions I post. It is often why I am quiet for months at a time!! But I have been honest in everything I have said, and opened an opportunity for anyone who wants to describe the scenario you portray.

    However, most parades pass in less than 30 minutes, so I am not sure I accept the picture of residents being restricted as you contend

  • Dewi

    Loved “For Cod and Ulster” by the way – only funny thing about the last few days – u can just sense the intensity rising – a bit like election time but worse.

  • Karl Popper would have been so pleased. Unfortunately the ould bugger is past pleasing

    Less of your lip, Rory. Karl Popper is class. Any more nonsense and I’ll start quoting Hayek at you!

    Karl Popper would have been so pleased. Unfortunately the ould bugger is past pleasing

    Slight reality check here – any major public festival anywhere that isn’t Saudi Arabia involves large amounts of public drunkenness. I lived a few hundred metres from the Notting Hill Carnival route for five years and vast amounts of drink are taken (some by me) and a blind eye is turned to soft drugs. Ditto Oktoberfest, Carnival in Rio, St. Patrick’s Day in New York, and that time in Spring in Tokyo when they all sit out in the parks looking at Cherry Blossoms. Take the aggro out of the 12th and the drinking won’t be a problem; then again, there may be too much drink about to take the aggro out of the 12th.

    Any public festival involves large amounts of drunken young men; the drink is only a part of the reason why things turn nasty on the 12th. That said, it all seems to have been much more laid back this year.

  • Sammy,

    No-one likes a pint more than me, but my main ‘gripe’ was about kids being trailed along while their mothers staggered in front of them. I have also been to Notting Hill, but i dont think we can equate the 2 parades to be quite honest.

    No-one is objecting per se to people having a drink on these occacions, but I think that kids being objected to some of this stuff is wrong. I speak as a parent myself.

  • Sorry I meant to say ‘subjected to’ in that last post…

  • DK

    macswiney: “wasnt even a newsagent where someone could buy a bottle of coke or a paper.”

    Have to take issue with this – I went for a drive at about 11am on the 12th to see the damage (the Shankill bonfire had melted one of the traffic lights, and the one at the bottom of Greys Lane was off the road this year thank goodness).

    Many off-licences were open as were several corner shops and garages. Plus most take-aways. The entire westfield centre was also open, but the Abbey centre was not.

  • DK,

    My post actually related to shops in Belfast City Centre.

  • jp

    we can’t equate the 12th and noting hill, yet the incidence of a drunken mother, a universal phenomenon in all western societies who happens to share the ethnicity that denotes the 12th of July as a festivity can have her drunkenness directly and exclusively equated to, and interpreted as, a result of the parade ?

    political bias twists the mind in some terrifying ways.

    in what way does mizz fitz moderation of this parade differ from her role as a spectator and photographer at INLA parades ?

  • JP,

    I’m afraid you are guilty of mis-reading my posts. I stressed that drunkeness in public is a growing problem in both Nationalist and Loyalist areas of the city. Therefore your comment about “terrifying” political bias is both totally inaccurate and overblown.

  • JP

    “but my main ‘gripe’ was about kids being trailed along while their mothers staggered in front of them”

    why mention this in exclusive terms about the 12th of July in Belfast ?

    this observation could apply equally to the 12th of December, or the 12th of March, anywhere in the UK and Ireland, wouldnt you agree ?

  • Comrade Stalin

    macswiney:

    I would still also stick to my point about the city centre. No matter what parades or carnivals take place in most other cities, there are always still some shops and restaurants open. There wasnt even a newsagent where someone could buy a bottle of coke or a paper.

    Would you ever wise the hell up. The same applies during the bank holiday over Easter – everything shuts. I don’t see you complaining about that. The 12th is a public holiday; things shut, and a prerequisite of either being a well-informed traveller, or a tour operator who looks after customers, is to be aware of public holidays in the destination country.

  • Miss Fitz

    JP
    I am not certain what question you are asking or what point you are making.

    I attend parades and commemorations for a wide range of reasons. I was at the South/O’Hanlon commemoration as part of research I was engaged in concerning commemorative practices. As some readers will know, my report was published earlier this year.

    My current area of interest is Fraternal Brotherhoods, and whether membership of such organisations can be considered as social capital or social stigma. Last year, I published an article examining the potential of the 12th of July as a tourist attraction.

    I also attend Pride parade, fancy dress parades, Corpus Christi parades and follow most funeral processions!!

    In past years, I had other entanglements and interests, but I make no distinction in these public events. I am a wannabe anthropologist, so its all the same to me.

  • Cruimh

    “Would you ever wise the hell up.”

    Out of bed the wrong side ?

  • willis

    I presume that it is just a matter of choice for the shops. There is no legal reason for them to be closed?

  • Ian

    “I presume that it is just a matter of choice for the shops. There is no legal reason for them to be closed?”

    Maybe their supposed legal guardians the PSNI can’t guarantee their safety if they break the unofficial curfew and open up?

  • darth rumsfeld

    “Maybe their supposed legal guardians the PSNI can’t guarantee their safety if they break the unofficial curfew and open up?”

    Oh drop the paranoia. There never is or was an unofficial curfew. The problem is that so many workers want to participate in or watch the parade- soooo disappointing for the predictors of our demise.

  • Actually Comrade,

    I actually HAVE complained on threads here before about how dead the city centre is (on dates other than the 12th). Might i also say, that I was supported by bloggers from both sides of the community.

  • Maybe their supposed legal guardians the PSNI can’t guarantee their safety if they break the unofficial curfew and open up?

    I doubt it, they’d probably do a roaring trade. Quite a few smaller newsagents and confectionaries outside the city-centre stay open, even (gasp)in E.Belfast.

  • DK

    “There never is or was an unofficial curfew. The problem is that so many workers want to participate in or watch the parade”

    And also that so many are off on holiday as well. You can’t get a plumber of any religion over the 12th fortnight, and lots of other shops are closed for the period as well.

  • willis

    “Yah, we went to Rio during Mardi Gras, and all the shops were shut. How awful is that?”

    “There never is or was an unofficial curfew. The problem is that so many workers want to participate in or watch the parade”

    Yea Darth and a country full of comely maidens dancing at the crossroads!

  • merrie

    Miss Fitz:

    Can you let me know the name of your report(s) and where they would be available?

    Thx

    Merrie

  • Dread Cthulhu

    DR: ““Yah, we went to Rio during Mardi Gras, and all the shops were shut. How awful is that?” ”

    Comparing the the Twelfth to Carnivale in Rio is a wee bit like comparing a Volkswagen Bug, circa 1968, with a Porsche. Just as both cars have rubber tyres and a steering column, both events may have parades and silly costumes, but they’re hardly the same thing.

    Sammy Morse: “Slight reality check here – any major public festival anywhere that isn’t Saudi Arabia involves large amounts of public drunkenness.”

    Funny — I’ve never seen pajama mamma’s staggering along with their ducklings in two at either the Thanksgiving or Christams parades on the occasions I’ve seen them on trips to NYC… Come to think of it, even the Easter parade was a sober event, last I watched.

  • Ian

    “Oh drop the paranoia. There never is or was an unofficial curfew.”

    A survey of Catholic-owned businesses in Belfast City Centre might beg to differ.

    Even in Newcastle Co Down, where everybody tends to get along so the shops stay open, there are often drunken hangers-on at the 12th parade down the main street, who run into the shops and trash them en route.

  • jp

    “I’ve never seen pajama mamma’s staggering along with their ducklings in two ”

    FUNNY IVE NEVER SEEN THAT AT THE 12TH.

    ” there are often drunken hangers-on at the 12th parade down the main street, who run into the shops and trash them en route”

    IS THERE A POLICE REPORT ON THIS ?

    Mizz Fitz,

    the question asked why you consider yourself in a position to moderate orange parades (never mind that you seem to feel you can call for the prohibition of the comemoration of the Glorious Dead of the UVF) and does this role differ from the one that motivates your attendence and photgraphic recording of INLA parades ?

  • Dread Cthulhu

    jp: “FUNNY IVE NEVER SEEN THAT AT THE 12TH. ”

    As I think was commented on the grafitti matter on another thead, jp, just because an individual claims to have not seen (or refuses to acknowledge) something doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist.

    But then, better-classed Protestants usually write-off such sights (when they acknowledge them at all) with a breathy “spides will be spides” and move on, presumably back to the garden shops and boutiques. As for the “spides,” I guess it’d be like asking a fish about water.

  • jp

    fine except I grew up in an estate and in a track suit, I even had a coin ring, knowing the term spide prove your a middle class hippy (;>)

    “presumably back to the garden shops and boutiques”

    now that sounds like someone has bought into a negative caricature to me, there are not many boutiques in rural Ulster, and keeping a garden for your pleasure is no indication of political beliefs or your character, some of the nicest wee gardens I’ve seen have been in working class catholic areas, not to mention the nice wee ones in the pension houses on the ShanKill,
    despising the middle classes is, in my observation, the pursuit of spoiled middle class children, who are the same people who read the guardian, who are the same people likely to use phrases like “garden centre Prods”
    the idea is to associate Prods with a provincial ‘well to do’ stereotype that the edgy young people will find disagreeable, ya get it ? to suggest it reflects the actual verifiable character in the middle classes is just empty headed.

    besides even if the middle classes were filled with the most farical aspirering snobs, the emergance of a middle class in Ulster is a good thing, woould yiou rather see us all back in the housing schemes ?

  • Dread Cthulhu

    jp: “fine except I grew up in an estate and in a track suit, I even had a coin ring, knowing the term spide prove your a middle class hippy (;>) ”

    Middle class, yes… hippie, not so much. ;{D

    jp: “the idea is to associate Prods with a provincial ‘well to do’ stereotype that the edgy young people will find disagreeable, ya get it ? to suggest it reflects the actual verifiable character in the middle classes is just empty headed. ”

    As opposed to, say, typing a response in all block capitals without punctuation?

    jp: “besides even if the middle classes were filled with the most farical aspirering snobs, the emergance of a middle class in Ulster is a good thing, woould yiou rather see us all back in the housing schemes ? ”

    Ach, jp, I already know there are middle-class protestants — they’re the one who don’t like OO parades on their patch — admittedly, for the sort they attract and what that sort of drunken lout does, as opposed to any sort of alleged intimidation.

    As for the rest — most of your points are things a body out-grows, assuming they’re capable — coin-rings and snotty comments about one’s parents both. A pity more didn’t outgrow the housing schemes.

  • jp

    typing in capitals and then not bothering to change it when you notice is an act of absent mindedness and mild indifference,
    endorsing a baseless stereotype is a shortcoming of an entirely more significant nature.

    ” I already know there are middle-class protestants—they’re the one who don’t like OO parades on their patch”

    you see that’s the problem with endorsing basis-less serotypes, they inform your opinions and then you just sound silly.
    I bet (and I mean it) you live in England and have only ever seen the 12th on the telly.

    and then you try your hand at being dismissive, trying to ribald snotty comments and then hitting me with “A pity more didn’t outgrow the housing schemes.” – well dread (H P Lovecraft name and your saying your not a hippy ?) I took the coin ring off long a ago (or the ‘mick masher’ as I liked to call it ;>) and am, thanks to academic selection, now comfortably employed and live in a nice little residential area in London.

    and, if you read the comment, I didn’t mention anyone’s parents, merely pointed out one of the unfortunate aspects of suburban teen rebellion, something that I thought was amusing to consider given the amount “oh ya its soooo middle class darling” guff you were spouting about, well, my people.

    ANYWAY ! THIS IS OF LITTLE RELEVANCE TO THE POST AD MY POINT IS SIMPLY : ‘GARDEN CENTRE PROD’ IS A SILLY AND COULD-BE DENIGRATORY STEREOTYPE, WITH NO USE IN UNDERSTAND THE ACTUAL DYNAMICS OF THE PROTESTANT COMMUNITY AND YOUR ATTEMPT TO INFER THAT SUCH PEOPLE ARE SOCIALLY IRRESPONSIBLE AND DISCONNECTED FROM REALITY IS SOCIALLY IRRESPONSIBLE AND DISCONNECTED FROM REALITY.
    and is, besides, sinister in its contempt.

  • miss fitz

    ‘the question asked why you consider yourself in a position to moderate orange parades (never mind that you seem to feel you can call for the prohibition of the comemoration of the Glorious Dead of the UVF) and does this role differ from the one that motivates your attendence and photgraphic recording of INLA parades ? ‘

    What bit of my anwer did you not get? I go to all sorts of parades JP. I dont ‘moderate’ orange parades, I observe them.

    And finally, you are on thin ice my friend. I am a fierce supporter of commemorations, and I feel they are a hugely important part of conflict resolution.

    If you are going to try and engage on this thread, try to do it more cogently

  • jpeters

    well said miss fitz i was a bit puzzled by JPs last message it had the air of whataboutery about it (if thats grammatically correct)

    JP what has INLA parades got to do with anything on this thread?

  • JP

    I will endeavour to Mizz,

    ” I am a fierce supporter of commemorations, and I feel they are a hugely important part of conflict resolution.”

    “Another thing I noticed, and not jus there, was the lack of UVF flags in general. The majority of flags were Union and Ulster, and it looks and feels a whole lot better. Please keep it up.”

    perhaps we have different understandings cogency.

    “JP what has INLA parades got to do with anything on this thread”

    the comparison of the treatment of the two events by the poster.

  • Nevin

    “My colleagues and I retired to the Holiday Inn for coffee and croissants, and a good chat about the morning … the same amount of drink and yobbery … Home at 10pm, to a Chinese and a bottle of wine.” .. Miss Fitz

    So this is how (some) middle-class yobs spend the Twelfth – and (maybe) at taxpayers’ expense :0)

  • Dread Cthulhu

    jp: “you see that’s the problem with endorsing basis-less serotypes, they inform your opinions and then you just sound silly. ”

    Actually, I’m just going with the flow of the news, jp, such as it is. As for playing with stereotypes, the whole reason a stereotype exists and continues is that it contains a central truth. That I indulge in a bit of hyperbole now and again is poetic license — a special effect for effect, if you will. That you feel the need to go on about thatt, rather than address the core of matters speaks volumes.

    Likewise, as for Protestants not wanting the OO marching through their areas due to the lager louts and drunken yobs these events attract, how else would you explain the antipathy in Bangor for future OO events?

    http://sluggerotoole.com/index.php/weblog/comments/call-to-ban-orange-parades-from-bangor/

    Or that the LOL and sundry bands has asked that their supporters “leave the blue bags at home?

    http://sluggerotoole.com/index.php/weblog/comments/leave-the-blue-bags-at-home/

    jp: “I bet (and I mean it) you live in England and have only ever seen the 12th on the telly. ”

    A bet you would lose, as a matter of fact. But that is what you get for stereotyping…

    jp: “and then you try your hand at being dismissive, trying to ribald snotty comments and then hitting me with “A pity more didn’t outgrow the housing schemes.” – well dread (H P Lovecraft name and your saying your not a hippy ?) I took the coin ring off long a ago (or the ‘mick masher’ as I liked to call it ;>) and am, thanks to academic selection, now comfortably employed and live in a nice little residential area in London. ”

    You make assumption on who I am and where I live based on a single post, whilst accusing me of stereotyping — hypocritical, much, jp?

    As for being a hippie, I’m not entirely sure how you juxtapose the use of a name from the work ok a pulp era horror writer whose central theme was, at its core, mankind’s unimportance in a cold, inhospitable universe, with a bunch of unwashed, kumbaya singing moochers.

    jp: “and, if you read the comment, I didn’t mention anyone’s parents, merely pointed out one of the unfortunate aspects of suburban teen rebellion, something that I thought was amusing to consider given the amount “oh ya its soooo middle class darling” guff you were spouting about, well, my people. ”

    And what does a teen rebel against, jp, if not “their parents,” be it in the specific or in broader terms — their values, their beliefs, etc. The US has gone so far that the children of the sixties find themselves raising god-fearing over-achievers who reject their if-it-feels-good-do-it bupkis.

    As for what I say, I freely admit to indulging in hyperbole. That doesn’t make what I say inaccurate in the main, your own defensiveness and willingness to “take one for the ‘hood” notwithstanding.

    And shouting with not make your position any more persuasive, nor will your efforts at ad hominem attack.

  • jp

    “Actually, I’m just going with the flow of the news, jp, such as it is. As for playing with stereotypes, the whole reason a stereotype exists and continues is that it contains a central truth”

    stertypes based in fact ?

    nuff said pal,

    im off to read tintin in the congo.

    “You make assumption on who I am and where I live based on a single post, whilst accusing me of stereotyping” – thats right, i made a judgement call on your character based on your statments and namesake, thats observation more than stertyping surely,

    “As for being a hippie, I’m not entirely sure how you juxtapose the use of a name from the work ok a pulp era horror writer whose central theme was, at its core, mankind’s unimportance in a cold, inhospitable universe, with a bunch of unwashed, kumbaya singing moochers. ”

    see, this is where the not from NI suspicion came in, as you would realise that over there the use of the term is much broader. and would of course include fans of a rather esoteric and flamboyant gothic horror writer.
    “unimportance in a cold, inhospitable universe” – a flamboyance i see you admire ;>

    “I freely admit to indulging in hyperbole”

    i feel NI is a serious subject in many ways, and that those who are entertained by it and use it as a talizman for their hyperbole, very annoying.

    “That doesn’t make what I say inaccurate in the main, your own defensiveness and willingness to “take one for the ‘hood” notwithstanding.”

    yes it does. ‘hood’ mate ? or do we enjoy negative afro ameriican sterotypes to ?

    and im not shouting im giggling,

    anyway we are quite spoiling the good womans post with this silliness, enjoy yourself and night night.

  • Martin

    “I also attend Pride parade, fancy dress parades, Corpus Christi parades and follow most funeral processions!!”

    Miss Fitz you must be kept busy – suppose getting to the odd free feed more than makes up for the cost of all those Irish News/Newsletters!

  • slug

    Miss Fitz – I was very interested to read your account. Many thanks.

  • graham

    As a non-Catholic and someone who happens to live on the Cregagh road can someone with more “insight” into the loyalist mentality perhaps tell me – why the little fuckers not content with lighting the bonfires where they should be – ALSO saw fit to build bonfires ON THE PUBLIC road at 5 junctions all the way up the Cregagh Road on the 11th July. I drove up at 5pm and lots of little spidey people were hauling tyres, lumps of wood, pallets, furniture etc., and unbelievably in one case an electric cooker (what the fuck!!) right out into the middle of the street. I drove back down about 9.30pm and they were all blazing away. Not only content with burning the street (actually five streets), they also managed to destroy a set of traffic lights and the control units. Two aspects of this totally insense me: 1. it is people like me (who actually work for a fucking living) that will end up paying for this shit. 2. I presume that the Cregagh Road being a fairly major carriageway was patrolled by the PSNI at some point on the 11th July and that the police may have noticed a few little (actually not so little) bonfires being erected in the middle of the road…. Hmmmm So if i decide to take my old sofa out into the road and set fire to it, that’s going to be alright then? You bet your fucking life its not. This was the first time in a long time that i was forced to stay in Belfast during this so-called ‘festival’. I can honestly say that the atmosphere in most parts of Belfast – i had to drive over to the Royal a few times to see my brother who had just been admitted – was like so tense. The whole scene was like some kind of post-apocalyptic nightmare with empty streets and an eerie silence (at least until the drunks started leaving the pubs). In fact, the Cregagh road on the morning of the 12th looked as if it had been bombed from the air. The stench of smoke, burning tyres, ash everywhere…. Nghtmare.

  • Gréagóir O’ Franclín

    The photos of the bonefire pile with the tri-colour and the initials K.A.T is all very welcoming to the other half of the community!

    Becoming regular practice now at the Twelfh celebrations! Part of the culture?