SF to push Republic’s corporation tax to 17.5%?

Interesting blog from North Report which has Caoimhghin O’Caolain calling for a raising of the key level of corporation tax and a raise to 50% income tax for those earning €100,000. Even for ‘cyclists’, ie those who believe that the current centre of gravity at the right of centre in southern Irish politics will inevitably be followed by a lurch to the centre left, it is a big ask given the Republic’s high dependence on foreign investment. Or it may indicate the party’s expected ‘point of arrival’ is still some two or three election cycles away.

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  • Henry94

    Sinn Fein are going to be the only party looking for a mandate to raise taxes. That is important for democracy. I’m not convinced it’s a good idea but I’m for having it debated.

  • Alan

    Link?

  • Stephen Copeland

    I think the title of this piece is a bit confused/confusing.

    SF to push Republic’s corporation tax to 17.5%? seems to imply that they either have the power to do that, or are expected to get the power. Neither is true. SF are not in power in the south, probably will not be in the government after next year’s eleection, and even if they are (big ‘if’), any attempt to push for and increase in the rate would be squashed very quickly by the main government party or parties.

    So it might be better to have titled this SF to push for Republic’s corporation tax to [rise to] 17.5%?.

  • A perfect example of why I won’t be voting Sinn Féin any time soon…

  • Mick Fealty

    Stephen, you win Pedant of the Month award (held contnuously since Willowfield left by our own Pete Baker).

    To have taken what you have taken out of the title, you have to know little or nothing about Irish politics. But thanks for the clarification.

  • andy

    17.5 % doesn’t seem that high – I thought the UK’s was 30%.

    Would it really put that many companies off, especially with the Republic’s highly skilled workforce, use of english language etc?

  • Henry94

    I think such an award should be called after willowfield. He was peerless.

  • Pete Baker

    That should be “held continuously“, Mick 😉

  • or “held contentiously”, Pete!

  • crataegus

    This must reflect SF’s own view of the position they will hold after the election. I.e. not in office.

  • Stephen Copeland

    Mick,

    Thanks for the award. I’ll put it with the other ones!

    But I don’t really understand your other comment: To have taken what you have taken out of the title, you have to know little or nothing about Irish politics.. I am genuinely confused. Could you explain?

  • Brian Boru

    SF are bonkers if they believe in this.

  • kensei

    “SF are bonkers if they believe in this”

    It’s fairly standard fare for a left wing party. The second is probably a more sensible suggestion than the first, due to the reliance on FDR.

  • Elvis Parker

    This will do wonders for FF and PD fund raising. All they need do is say to all those US computer and pharma companies is ‘ look give us a few million and we’ll save you ten times that by keeping corporation tax down’

  • peter

    Awarding a “Pendant of the month” prize looks like playing the man not the ball.

  • First, this is old news.

    Second, the 17.5% figure comes straight from the ESRI, which states that Ireland would still be competitive at that rate.

  • Stephen Copeland

    Peter,

    Awarding a “Pendant of the month” prize looks like playing the man not the ball.

    I agree. It also neatly side-stepped my question. Mick both broke his own rules, and avoided answering a simple question.

  • Sam

    Hoist…

    Petard…

    Whoosh!

  • Christalmighty, Sluggiepoos, breathe deeply, oxygenate the blood and get the brain online again and don’t let the spellchecker rule your life.

    It’s

    Pendants hang,
    Pedants should.

    Re Sinn Fein:

    They are looking for power.
    Their voter base heretofore has been ripped off from Labour.
    This tax hype is canted toward Labour lefties that gag at the maggot of joining with the Blueshirts.
    Like the “immigration issue” in the US, it’s a means to pursue power, nothing else.

  • Mick Fealty

    Thanks Jim. Looks like I’ve got one supporter in the house. Hoisted? Yes indeed. Don’t try humour at home kids. Someone always gets hurt.

  • Sinn Fein don’t have an economic policy, just a couple of shibboleths. Their political strength comes from a mixture of nationalist rhetoric, vote rigging, and community work/policing. Their TDs have been very unimpressive and inarticulate. People don’t vote for them for jobs (people join them for jobs). In the North, all (2 + UUP, SDLP) major political parties are economic retards (spongers Harald Wilson famously called them) and, as Sinn Fein is organized on a 32 county basis, their economic autism is reflected in their Southern policies. A proper alignment of conservative forces (Fianna Fail and Fine Gael) would put these dinasaurs out in the political cold forever.

  • kensei

    “A proper alignment of conservative forces (Fianna Fail and Fine Gael) would put these dinasaurs out in the political cold forever.”

    Yeah, because the crushing of all other political view sis such a desirable otcome for democracy. FFS.

  • Gerry Lvs Castro

    ”Yeah, because the crushing of all other political view sis such a desirable otcome for democracy.”

    Yes Kensei you appear to have uncovered another SF policy plank with this statement.
    By considering themselves the ‘rightful govt of Ireland’, SF/IRA are already theoretically ‘crushing all other political views’ and of course being unable to commit a crime comes in handy too.
    SFs loony left policies, if implemented, could easily tip the economy back to the 1970s and beyond, but I hear there are plenty of Russians who hanker after the good old days of Stalinism, so there’s still lots of mileage in flogging the dead horse of the extreme left.

  • Hardy

    Mr. McDowell’s apt aphorism is the best comment on SF’s looney economics:
    “Hello Mary Lou, goodbye jobs”.