Author Archive | Niall Ó Dochartaigh

Historians and the Stormont house Agreement

Twelve historians and social scientists from several different universities in Britain and Ireland came together recently for a workshop on the Stormont House Agreement. The aim was to consider the role of academics in dealing with the past and to make some recommendations on the kind of contribution they might make. I have pasted in more…

oatley

Looking back on the Hunger Strikes

Three key figures reflect on the Irish Republican hunger strikes of 1980 and 1981 in filmed interviews and a public talk posted online by the School of Political Science and Sociology at NUI Galway to mark the 35th anniversary of the 1981 hunger strike. The videos include a public interview with former hunger striker Laurence more…

TCD campus map

New Media, New Politics: Social Media and Conflict Transformation in Northern Ireland

This Roundtable brings together bloggers, journalists, and academics to discuss the changing use of new technologies in Northern Irish politics, focusing in particular on the use of social networks in recent political campaigns and street protests. This session is part of the Political Studies Association of Ireland (PSAI) annual conference but it is open to more…

POQU

The Peace Process in an Age of Uncertainty

The latest issue of The Political Quarterly includes articles from a recent symposium on ‘Northern Ireland: The Peace Process in an Age of Uncertainty’. It is freely available online until the end of April. The Political Quarterly “is dedicated to political and social reform and has long acted as a conduit between policy-makers, commentators and more…

Negotiating Peace

A symposium on Negotiating Peace taking place in the National University of Ireland Galway next Tuesday afternoon may be of interest to some on Slugger. The speakers include Michael Oatley, a key British official involved in back-channel communication with the Republican leadership over many years, Seán Ó hUiginn, former senior Irish diplomat who was deeply more…

Bloody Sunday: A calculated confrontation?

The Saville Inquiry has uncovered strong evidence that Bloody Sunday was the outcome of a determined military plan to stage a major and unprecedented confrontation in Derry, but will the final report reflect this evidence? The Bloody Sunday Inquiry has not found proof of a British Government plan to carry out a massacre of civilians more…

Bloody Sunday: Error or Design?

The publishers of ‘Contemporary British History’ have agreed to allow free access until the end of June to an academic article on Bloody Sunday that I wrote recently. The article draws on the evidence generated by the Saville Inquiry to trace the outlines of an intense internal struggle to shape security policy in Derry. It more…

Derry Essays 2: A city on the border…

Derry is in the UK, true enough, but not only in the UK. The potential ‘UK City of Culture’ now stretches well beyond the boundaries of the state. Housing estates full of Derry commuters have sprung up in recent years on all the roads that stretch north, south and west of the city centre and more…