Negotiating Peace

A symposium on Negotiating Peace taking place in the National University of Ireland Galway next Tuesday afternoon may be of interest to some on Slugger. The speakers include Michael Oatley, a key British official involved in back-channel communication with the Republican leadership over many years, Seán Ó hUiginn, former senior Irish diplomat who was deeply involved in the peace process as head of the Anglo-Irish division of the Dept. of Foreign Affairs, Professor Paul Arthur, Honorary Associate at the International Conflict Research Centre (INCORE) and former Professor of Politics at the University of Ulster and myself, Niall Ó Dochartaigh. The symposium is organised in association with the launch of the private papers of intermediary Brendan Duddy in the archives of the James Hardiman Library at NUI Galway. Further information is available on http://conference.ie under ‘Duddy Archive Symposium’. Pre-registration is essential as space is limited.

  • Granni Trixie

    I for one am very interested. Anthropology shows that after any ‘war’ back stories emerge filling in the;picture

    If it were not in Galway I would certainly want to attend this event. Any chance of a rerun ‘here’?

  • Mick Fealty

    Can we do something to get that conversation out online Niall?

  • Hopefully Mick. We will video the symposium and the launch for the archive here. If the speakers are happy for it to be podcast we will do that. I’ll have more information after the event.

  • michael-mcivor

    Oatley was the mi6 brit who wanted peace after the tonne bombs in england- peace after war-

  • Framer

    As I recall, it was Michael Oatley (aka the daftly named Mountain Climber) who advised the Provos that London only wanted a way out of Northern Ireland. They should therefore enter into a peace process with Brits Out being ultimately guaranteed.

    The pathetic thing is they both probably believed it.

    It was because of people like him that the war went on for 30 years with London surrendering politically and the British Army continuing to have to resist the IRA for democratic and ‘national’ reasons. The result was unending war until one or other saw sense.