SDLP likely to run in every constituency across Northern Ireland

Chris had a piece up this morning about whether a Nationalist/Remain understanding was still possible for the upcoming elections.

Following on from his post I contacted the SDLP to see if the party were going to stand in the various constituencies across the North and the response I received from a party spokesman is below;

The SDLP sought to bring together a broad coalition of parties and candidates to maximise the pro-Europe mandate in Northern Ireland. When it was clear that other parties would not support that aim, we proposed support for independent, non-party aligned, pro Europe candidates who could take on Brexit MPs. That proposal was also rejected by others.

The SDLP is now in the process of selecting candidates in constituencies across the North who will take the fight to the Tories at Westminster, opposing their hard brexit and even harder austerity agenda.

 

The first paragraph simply repeats original proposal from the SDLP and it will be difficult for the party to find a way to back other party candidates in certain constituencies such as North Belfast.

Slugger understands that the likelihood is that the party will stand in every constituency in Northern Ireland and that the proposal that was made was not able to be brought to fruition. This would be in line with the approach the party took back in 2015 when this issue came up again.

 

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  • Karl

    The wise move would be for SF to withdraw from SB unilaterally and leave the voters of NB to make up their own minds. It will probably see the two encumbents remain in situ but like in FST, it will be the death knell for the SDLP in another mixed constituency.

  • Vince

    I doubt they will do that. As in 2015 their main purpose will be to drag down A McDonnell by whatever means possible.

  • AntrimGael

    Electoral pacts in the North are sectarian, dirty and pretty unpalatable. However they are reality and merely a reflection of society here. The SDLP trying to claim the higher ground by refusing to engage in them is fantasy land nonsense and will just garner further contempt and increasingly withering support from the Nationalist community.
    The SDLP should stop trying to engage in the pretence of ‘integrity politics’ because there are none here and never will be. The reality is it’s a divided, parallel society and they would be better served maximising the Nationalist vote. Never mind the fake outrage and mock indignation from the Unionist and media political and media Establishments in the event of a Nationalist pact. Taking lectures from them is like being called fat by Billy Bunter.

  • Granni Trixie

    News: “SDLP stands candidates all across the North”. Says it all really. Why would a political party not have candidates in all constituencies?
    The fact that the Poster adopts sf language (ditching ‘Republican’ and ‘ the former North ‘ is consistent with his advocacy for sectarian pacts.

    I think Posters on Slugger ought to be more up front about the
    perspective from which they speak – in most cases they are not neutral obsevsers but have a dog in the race.

  • Karl

    Ironically, unionist pacts might see them come out with 3 out of 4 Belfast seats this time and 0 from 3 in the next election once the new boundaries come into being.
    If the unionists do manage it, it will be a false dawn.

  • Vince

    Colum Eastwood made very energetic attempts to maximise the Remain voice from this campaign on the basis of it being a Brexit election. Those were entirely reasonable and potentially could have delivered a majority of Remain supporters from across the political spectrum and including independents. It is deeply disappointing that this opportunity has now been lost and that the majority of those returned will be supporters of the economic and trading calamity that is Brexit.

  • aquifer

    Great, a political party at last, I was getting sick of sectarian bean counters.

  • Karl

    I think SF will need to decide fairly quickly if this campaign is to be about wiping out the SDLP possibly taking one, outside shot at 2 and aiding unionists win SB.

    What is better for nationalism? To have 6/7 of 18 seats in NI not sitting in Westminster as a symbol or 3 nationalists and 5 republican seats.

    I think this election will be about maximising the nationalist vote and coalescing, the electorate at least, under a broader anti Brexit nationalism

    The SDLP gutting can wait for 2022

  • Vince

    I am sure they are all good people but unconsciously or otherwise Chris, David, Daithi all come from very similar perspectives. This is fine as long as readers understand that, as with “commentators” in our local press, these are not detached wiseacres observing from afar.

  • Vince

    Karl, no harm but I think that sort of sentiment in the last line is very unfortunate (whatever party one supports). Having the broadest possible representation and voices in parliament/committees is the best outcome for this place.

  • David McCann

    Just for clarity (btw we have rules on playing the man on this site) I used the same language given to me by the SDLP in their statement. You’ll note the use of Northern Ireland in the title.

  • file

    I think Pastors on Slugger is a great name for a rock band (and only a slight change to your keyboard slip). Do you want to join it? Or would you prefer Priests on Codeine as a name?

  • file

    What is better for Nationalism? Ignoring that centrist, anachronistic mother of all parliaments and misrule.

  • Vince

    Disagree about “integrity politics”. It is in short supply but if you look hard enough I think you find a bit of it in most/all political parties here. Without it there would have been even less progress over the last 40 years. We should encourage it, not shoot it down, God knows we need it.

  • Karl

    I wouldnt support it but the SDLP have been on borrowed time for a while now and riding their luck. When their MPs go, it is likely, it will be all of them

  • Granni Trixie

    Sounds like my kind of band. Curiously, this is one of those threads which doesn’t not have an edit button with which to correct typos.

  • Granni Trixie

    But can’t you see that equally, it could be a death not to stand?

  • Granni Trixie

    Sorry David, ought to have restrained my annoyance. Will try to be more disciplined in future.

  • Karl

    Yup. Rock and a hard place stuff, but I suppose one option maximises nationalist, sorry anti Brexit ;0), representation and the other is just another gulp of air for a party on an inexorably downward track.

  • Jag

    “The SDLP sought to bring together a broad coalition of parties and candidates to maximise the pro-Europe mandate in Northern Ireland. When it was clear that other parties would not support that aim, we proposed support for independent, non-party aligned, pro Europe candidates who could take on Brexit MPs. That proposal was also rejected by others.”

    “Other”=SF

    Must have missed the SDLP making any offers. Must also have missed SF rejecting those alleged offers.

  • ted hagan

    Well said. Brexit is being used as a cover for more sectarian crap.

  • ted hagan

    A pact might make sense if Sinn Fein finally grew up and took their seats at Westminster. Is the SF boycott of Westminster not just playing at ‘integrity politics’?

  • Not Fooled

    How long is it going to take for people to realise our interests do not lie with Westminister. We need to grasp the future and instead of begin a backwater in a place that has no real interest in us join the rest of Europe and develop a society that will thrive instead of beg. The SDLP have done their very best to make the colonial system work….it has failed and so have they.

  • ted hagan

    Dignity intact at least, Why humiliate yourself like the UUP?

  • Not Fooled

    Agreed. I think Colum Eastwood is an honourable politician but he is surrounded by egotists and self-seekers. They are not a party but a collection of individuals. Their big hitters have disappeared to Westminister and in the process have achieve nothing. In the past, the Hume era, they were a party of vision, no more. They need to encourage Fianna Fáil to organise here asap. It’s their only hope. The nationalist electorate ‘have found them out’ and they are in big trouble.

  • Not Fooled

    I think Colum Eastwood is an honourable politician but he is surrounded by egotists and self-seekers. They are not a party but a collection of individuals. Their big hitters have disappeared to Westminister and in the process have achieve nothing. In the past, the Hume era, they were a party of vision, no more. They need to encourage Fianna Fáil to organise here asap. It’s their only hope. The nationalist electorate ‘have found them out’ and they are in big trouble.

  • johnny lately

    Ted do you believe a human rights lawyer like John Finucane who has his own practice and is now well established would sacrifice his career and his earning potential to become an absentee MP earning just above an average industrial wage never mind the opportunity to challenge those British MPs in their own parliament who wish to brush their governments complicity in his fathers murder under the carpet ?

  • Vince

    I think this misses the point. You make your case and have your voice heard wherever you have the opportunity, whether in Brussels, London, Dublin, Belfast or your local council. And I really don’t think that the SDLP and their voters or those who have tried to make this place better can be regarded as colonialists.

  • Granni Trixie

    But surely as he would not be taking on his seat or the workload of an MP he will still be in a position to continue as a solicitor?

  • Nevin

    The SDLP’s pro-remain stance was never more than a thinly camouflaged anti-UK/pro-UI one; Alliance blew it out of the water whilst the Greens dithered.

    Ireland, the state, is a useful pawn in the EU Commission’s game and the presence or absence of a Northern Ireland Executive is largely irrelevant, despite Colum’s protestations.

  • Endeavour

    Agree totally. I was an SDLP stalwart in the Hume/Mallon days. However, since they stepped down (and particularly since Brian Feeney “left”) – I,like many others, have become disillusioned with the SDLP. Eastwood has potential but his party is still saddled with egotistical self-seekers like Ritchie and McDonnell and Kelly.

    I remember when they used to rotate the office of Mayor in Derry to try to show an example but the DUP/UUP just spat in their faces for years in Belfast – in fact it was only demographics that led to a Nationalist mayor – not any reaching out from Unionists – they weren’t so interested in democracy when the “fleg” vote went through. However, the SDLP appear to have learnt nothing from this.

    I think that both SB + NB are lost if both the SDLP and SF stand. There is a chance that Elliott may be unseated by SF in FST especially if the SDLP run the same poor candidate as last time.

    However, I think the SDLP misjudge the mood of the nationalist electorate. Ritchie and Durkan may survive but they’ll be more dependent on Unionist votes than ever before.

    In the scheme of things – we may end up electing 5/6 Nationalist MPs instead of 8/9 thereby providing an extremely unrepresentative view (especially re Brexit) of the population of the North in London.

    However, the election in March showed the anger among Nationalism at the arrogance of Foster and the DUP. If the SDLP cost Nationalism seats by standing in places where they have no chance – it will simply accelerate their progress to oblivion.

  • Katyusha

    What is better for nationalism? To have 6/7 of 18 seats in NI not sitting in Westminster as a symbol or 3 nationalists and 5 republican seats.

    The question in Connolly House is more likely to be “What is better for Sinn Féin?”

  • Katyusha

    They need to encourage Fianna Fáil to organise here asap. It’s their only hope.

    Why would FF standing in NI be a good thing for the SDLP? It’s more likely to wipe them out. Unless you’re suggesting the current SDLP politicos would jump to FF instead?

  • hugh mccloy

    Party stands candidates in election, when did this become a headline ??

  • Karl

    When 2 of the 4 biggest decided it wasnt for them.

  • Granni Trixie

    What’s wrong with acquiring Unionist votes?

  • Not Fooled

    I understand your point Vince and it would be true if someone was listening. I honestly think that the only time Westminister listens to us, in the broadest sense, is when they need the votes and because of the make up of parliament at the moment and most certainly after the next election, none of our votes will be needed and they’ll go completely deaf. MRs May’s actions in calling an election when she did illustrates this. I do agree that there are places that are more open to listening to our unique circumstances but Westminister isn’t one of them. Fair point on the colonialists but I was talking about the system not them. I feel the SDLP were genuine in reaching out and trying to make things better for all but the Westminister system is still embedded in Empire and they don’t play by the same rules as democratic states but that’s another story.

  • Not Fooled

    Yes.

  • Skibo

    Granni an SDLP seat that requires Unionist votes will not be safe as the demographics close in. Unionism will fear the look of an overall Nationalist vote creeping above the Unionist vote that they may not do it even if it means a SF MP.

  • Katyusha

    Fair enough. In my view if they are not capable of reforming/repositioning the SDLP into a northern-FF by themselves, they should not be waiting for a white knight to swoop in and save their careers. They’re hardly deserving of it if they are not able to put in the hard work and take the appropriate risks by themselves, or if they lack the talent to do so. Eastwood is a capable and likable leader, but underneath I feel the party is as stagnant, unimaginative and unambitious as ever.

  • johnny lately

    And your absolutely sure he won’t be taking his seat because ……. ?

  • Not Fooled

    My point is that it is because they are just a northern party they are doomed to failure. The game has changed, partition is and was always a disaster, the place could never work politically or economically . I believe we are at the beginning of the end of the northern state. A United Ireland is the only way forward ….. It always was. I don’t mean this in an isolationist sense, I mean a United Ireland within Europe.

  • Granni Trixie

    surely if he is prepared (allowed) to take a seat should he win he would be shouting it from the rooftops prior to the election – his USP to dispel the idea that a vote for SF is a wasted vote because they do not try to exert influence in Westminster?

    But even in that event I will be really surprised if he settles for an average industrial wage (would like to be a fly on he wall when he tells his wife!).

  • johnny lately

    Granni the election isn’t over yet and Sinn Fein have yet to make their position clear but im sure, depending on the numbers and make up of the new parliament, that Sinn fein might think about dropping that abstentionist policy. Opportunities like Brexit and the fact that the SNP is also demanding Scottish independence only come once in a lifetime.

  • Granni Trixie

    commonsense at last!

  • ted hagan

    Look, the blunt truth is this. May is going to get a huge mandate at the next election. Even the Remainers in Great Britain are realising that the battle is lost and their best option is to give May a strong hand in negotiations. Bleating about Brexit in Northern Ireland is a waste of time and energy.
    The best tactic would be a joint approach by unionists and nationalists to ensure the best deal for the North.
    Of course that involve intelligence, and move away from the surge in tribal, sectarian warfare, which would probably be asking too much.

  • the Moor

    The key question confronting nationalist voters in the north in the upcoming election and beyond is this: what are/is the SDLP for (in future)? Until the Belfast Agreement and the resulting new, interim Stormont structures, the party’s purpose as the voice of constitutional nationalism was obvious and unequivocal. In the period since 1999 however the purpose of the SDLP has ceased to be obvious and demonstrably, over time, for middle as well as working class electors, the basis of attraction becomes evermore equivocal. Manifestly, this is because the constitutionalising of Sinn Fein has diminished the SDLP’s electoral appeal in a quite basic way.

    A second, related question arises for the hypothetical nationalist elector: as there are in fact now two parties of (constitutional) nationalism in the field, why vote for the minor of the two especially where/when to vote for them may diminish the impact of nationalist representation as a proportion of the whole? A third question for nationalist electors arises as a correlation of the previous two: thinking about it, towards the aim(s) that define a nationalist politics in the first place, in pursuance of same, as an instrument of change, surely an undivided nationalist bloc is what would best serve nationalist objectives?

    The logical conclusion arising out of these linked questions and inferred answers is plainly what explains the ever-increasing hegemony of Sinn Fein and the corresponding and progressive marginalisation of the SDLP (since 1999).

    The SDLP are thus faced with an existential crisis. A party whose future is all behind them, do they: 1) accept the logic of pan-nationalist coalition as an expression of the wishes and interests of the nationalist community of the north, 2) compete with Sinn Fein among nationalist electors for a share of nationalist votes (but in a way catholic nationalist electors may conclude splits the effectiveness the nationalist bloc), or 3) seek to establish some other basis of identification with NI electors (including non-nationalist ones). Not least as the corollary of this third position would be to endorse a defacto partitionist stance, a ‘third way’ for the SDLP of doing politics, in the context of NI’s zero-sum, would surely be absurd.

    As a consequence of resentful nostalgia, looking back to the 1990s, the second choice position as outlined is more or less where the SDLP presently stand: they’re the ‘We’re not Sinn Fein, catholic nationalist party’. This prospectus depends on an historical appeal to the party’s past achievements in successfully transforming physical force republicanism into a vehicle of constitutional (aka gradualist) nationalism allied to a – not altogether convincing – reminder to their former electors that Sinn Fein used to the party of physical force nationalism (and that they don’t deserve to be rewarded for it).

    In need of a strategy for survival, having for the time being, due to their hurt feelings and tribalist pride, rejected pan-nationalism, the SDLP require a real basis of difference and differentiation from the party of nationalism that will surely otherwise overrun them. In this Sinn Fein’s abstentionism is one of the SDLP’s very few remaining USPs. Is it enough to assure survival and continuing relevance? Not for long would be my guess.

    The choice of three positions thus comes down to two related rhetorical questions for the SDLP – are we primarily a nationalist party? If so, why would we obstruct the development of a nationalist bloc in the north? Or, more crudely, colloquially, second fiddle or no fiddle at all?

  • eireanne3

    “their best option is to give May a strong hand in (Brexit) negotiations”.
    AFAIK it makes no difference to the EU negotiators what majority Ms May has in Westminster or indeed who is PM (May or Corbyn) of the UK.

  • Brendan Heading

    This is a strange way of looking at the matter. I have a different take (natch).

    The right way to approach the matter would have been to put out feelers, out of sight of the public eye, to see if anyone else was on board. The answer “no” would have come back, certainly from Alliance and probably from the Greens, and Colum could have carried on as normal with the SDLP’s principles publicly intact.

    Instead Colum chose to make his appeal via the media, opening up a divisive debate about pacts in public, and now finds himself in the awkward position of having advocated a pact to maximise Northern Ireland’s pro-remain message, while arguing that such a pact is impossible if it only includes SF as the other partner. He clearly didn’t brief senior party figures about this plan ahead of time, and he damaged relations with other parties by trying to push them into a pact in public.

    I’d call that a dog’s dinner.

  • Vince

    Needless to say Brendan, I think that’s disappointingly negative and jaundiced. Colum Eastwood comes across as a very earnest, straightforward, astute and well-motivated guy. Transparency and openness is to be admired in a politician, not clandestine back room conversations which will probably leak out anyway to cause embarrassment at a later date. I think that AP rejected the approach far too quickly, the Greens did so unconvincingly, and finally SF were simply mistaken to reject the final option of non-party pro-Remain candidates.

    In terms of consulting with his colleagues, well I don’t know anything about that – but isn’t that what we want in a leader? Leadership, an ability to lead and make decisive moves? What are the alternatives? Well it looks like Michelle has to ask Gerry, Robin has to ask Arlene, Steven has to find out if you’re pro-life (just criminal that) or not first, and Naomi appears to calculate (in this instance) on the basis of the party good rather than the general good first.

    As we have noted on here before, Alliance have acted in the greater good before in elections and this was another opportunity. It was wrong to reject the approach as sectarian – I am not involved in politics here but simply don’t accept that Colum Eastwood is sectarian by nature or motivation.

  • Madra Uisce

    Exactly, all this strong hand garbage is another Tory lie, the EU wont give a tuppenny damn about whether May has a large or small majority.

  • Gaygael

    I agree with much of what you say but we greens took a measured approach. We consulted internally and externally and our primary reasons for opposing were clearly articulated. It’s dissapointing you fixate on the pro choice difference but we clearly said that big bridges to be crossed in such short notice. We are one of only two assembly parties of eight which are pro-choice. That is a legitimate stance and which broadly reflects public opinion.

    Alliances knee jerk rejection and subsequent labelling as sectarian was not helpful. Positioning for east belfast trumped the opportunity to at least explore for the greater good.

    We greens are not sectarian.

  • Vince

    I agree with your last point Gaygael and have not thought otherwise. I think on the other issue we will have to agree to differ and I completely respect your right to have a different view. I don’t want to go off topic of the post or engage in fraught argument here but I hope you will try to understand why I personally felt offended by the premise that being pro-life somehow puts someone like me beyond the Pale. I work in healthcare, believe that all human life is precious (although I am not a fan of Precious Life) and of value and feel that abortion (of all types) is a profound tragedy for everyone touched by it.

  • Robin Keogh

    Ted, the SF boycott of Westminster is based firmly on the belief that London should have a far lesser impact and influence on politics here. That is the platform upon which they stand and it appears the vast majority of nationalists agree with the principle.

  • Robin Keogh

    The question in any organisation be it public, private, political, or civil is ‘what will give us the ability to be successful and reach our goals’ Any organisation that does not prioritise as such, is hardly worthy of consideration.

  • Lionel Hutz

    The call for a pro remain pact was better made in public. Otherwise the SDLP would have been left tilting at windmills. The call and the failure to make agreementioned have given a clear public and logical position.

  • Lionel Hutz

    The vast majority of nationalist’s don’t care about representation in Westminster. It’s not a matter of principle. Let’s face it. Most nationalist vote for the horse race the same as unionist’s do. The result of what comes after is neither here nor there.

  • Lionel Hutz

    If they honestly did that then they would make it public before the SDLP stand a candidate in the constituency. The SDLP would likely have difficulty standing against John Finucane if he took his seat. Your point is pure fantasy

  • T.E.Lawrence

    Was thinking that myself Karl ! It will be interesting to see if the Unionists can get them proposed Belfast Boundary changes amended ?

  • T.E.Lawrence

    “and finally SF were simply mistaken to reject the final option of non-party pro-remain candidates” I beggar to differ ? I think SF have played a blinder and come out of the whole issue ‘smelling of roses’ They will run two very strong candidates who will take 2 out of the 3 Belfast constituencies in the next westminster elections !

  • Vince

    Not sure about that. John Finucane would have had a strong chance of winning this time as an independent candidate and could have been an excellent and hopefully bipartisan voice for victims in the HoC this time. An agreed independent pro-Remain candidate in FST would have been a sure winner (rather than a marginal call) and another independent pro-Remain candidate such as Deirdre Heenan in E Derry would have had a sporting chance vs Gregory Campbell.

    Regarding next time, I suspect that there will still be 4 seats in Belfast. Once TM has her majority of 150-200 on June 8 (the local election results yesterday will look like a good outcome for Labour) I think that the boundary changes and seat reductions will be ditched – she will not want to upset dozens of her own newly elected MPs.

  • johnny lately

    I remember it was pure fantasy that they would sit in Stormont, I remember it was pure fantasy that the IRA would decommission, I remember it was pure fantasy they would sit on policing boards and I remember it was pure fantasy that collusion even happened but as history now records things we believed would never happen did happen. The same goes for republicans taking their seats at Westminster, if taking their seats advances the goal of a United Ireland forward then why let pride and tradition stand in the way of progress.

  • Gaygael

    That’s fair enough. We disagree on abortion. I don’t necessarily think all pro lifers are beyond the pale.

    We have a very clear policy on this issue which has pretty much unanimous support.
    Our deputy leader is a volunteer clinic escort at Marie Stopes ensuring women can access legal healthcare without harrassenentcand intimidation. She was also developing a private members bill to ensure women had safe access to sexual and reproductive healthcare.
    At such short notice it was too big a gap to bridge. We took a week to properly consult and consider it.

  • Granni Trixie

    But are you not strategically conflating Republican and NatiOnalist mood?

  • Granni Trixie

    It has been a dogs dinner!

  • Granni Trixie

    Alliance was clear where it stood based on past learning and policy. The Leadership acted decisively – I have heard nothing whatsoever about anyone in the party disagreeing with their response to calls for pacts. The quick response left no other parties in doubt where Alliance stood. Fair most and well judged most people would say.

  • Granni Trixie

    Sf have demonstrated yet again that they can match Unionist sectarianism.

  • Granni Trixie

    I was told that Deirdre Heenan was asked by SDLP to stand for them last time round but she refused.

  • Granni Trixie

    Have you actual evidence for asserting that a pro choice stance reflects public opinion? I ask this because it is my impression that what is reflected in public opinion is a spectrum and more nuanced than reflected in a ‘pro choice’ policy.

  • Granni Trixie

    Surely you mean that Republicans agree? Or are you not allowed to write that?

  • Granni Trixie

    How depressing if that is so.

  • Granni Trixie

    Why would the SDLP have difficulty standing against JF? another Bobby Sands mistake?

  • Robin Keogh

    Try not to play the Man Granni.

  • Vince

    I hadn’t heard that but interesting to know that they were thinking in that direction. She would make an excellent candidate and MP/MLA. There are too many politicos (and voters) around who confuse a bit of media training and the ability to string a few sentences together with competence and the ability to run public services. We need people with real brains and expertise like Deirdre.

  • Vince

    I understand the position (although the press release characterisation of the approach was OTT and unfair). Perhaps I expect too much but pragmatism & self interest rarely brings positive change quickly.

  • Granni Trixie

    How is it ‘playing the man’ to point out patterns? Especially with reference to what many regard as a cult?

  • Timothyhound

    Mays majority makes NI difference to the deal Britain gets. The bottom line is simply that leaving the EU has to hurt and that will feature as the central point of the outcome of Brexit. Meanwhile the great irony is that FPTP will ensure a pro Brexit majority of MPs in NI. Why not a deal that gives Finucane and McDonnell a clear run in Belfast? Brexit is trashing the local economy and neither Eastwood or O’Neill/Adams seems bothered.

  • Timothyhound

    Westminster is turning into a one party state. Taking seats only gives succour to a rotten and wholly undemocratic system.

  • Vince

    Brian Feeney! Bitter, twisted, bilious Brian? Essentially a failed politician with an axe to grind. Depressing, repetitive, angry, endlessly man/woman playing, completely lacking in vision or perspective. His successor as a councillor in the Oldpark area, Nichola Mallon, is everything that Brian Feeney is not – hard working, public spirited, conscientious, principled. She gets a bullet in the post from paramilitaries for her trouble – Brian? He just gets bouquets from Gerry Adams. I think I’ll take public representatives like Nichola any time.

  • Robin Keogh

    you know exactly what you are doing (or trying to do) and it is beneath you.

  • ted hagan

    Yes, but they will in the end. Better face the music than live in denial

  • Gaygael

    Here is some of the nuance from amnesty.
    https://www.amnesty.org.uk/files/millward_brown_report_of_public_opinion_research_oct_2016.pdf

    I would also point to the constitutional convention in the south. When people have reasoned debate, informed by women and health professionals and their associated professional bodies, people are pro choice.

    The fear, shaming, scaremongering and emotive rhetoric is removed and allows people space to consider.

  • Granni Trixie

    I totally agree with your last sentence.