Theresa May challenged over her “tin ear” to the interests of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland

Theresa May is in Swansea today at the start of a four nation tour to the devolved administrations , declaring; “I want every part of the United Kingdom to be able to make the most of the opportunities ahead.”

As the Guardian reports she’ll face demands from the Welsh First Minister Carwyn Jones  to radically rethink her approach to the union. as she begins a four-nation tour before beginning Britain’s exit from the EU

“Theresa May to visit Wales as she faces pressure to keep Union together” is  the Daily Telegraph headline.

Jones told the Guardian that May’s “tin ear” on issues of devolution would mean Westminster will soon replace the EU at the heart of voters’ frustrations at having their affairs managed from afar.

He said there was a battle looming over granting greater devolved powers, backed this weekend by the former prime minister Gordon Brown, which the government had to take seriously or risk fracturing the country.

“If they are not careful, people’s sense of disengagement with Brussels will simply attach itself to London,” he said. “They are giving the impression sometimes that they do not listen.

Jones said there was much the Welsh and Northern Irish governments were still in the dark over, including which courts would arbitrate on state aid and any new regulations covering devolved arrangements, such as agriculture, which had previously been the domain of the European court of justice.

His case is backed up by a report from the think tank the Institute for Government  complaining that:

to date there has been a complete lack of clarity about the role that the devolved legislatures will play in legislating for Brexit. The attitude that the Scottish National Party (SNP) takes to the passage of Brexit-related legislation in Westminster could affect the smoothness with which that legislation passes through Parliament if they join forces with the Labour Party and Conservative rebels (although it is unlikely to prevent its eventual passage). The Government should make clear at the earliest opportunity what role it envisages for the devolved legislatures: whether the devolved legislatures will need to pass their own bills to preserve EU legislation that has effect at a devolved level; and, whether ‘legislative consent’ motions will be needed to signal the nations’ assent to UK-wide primary legislation changing the powers of the devolved government.

The attitude that the Scottish National Party (SNP) takes to the passage of Brexit-related legislation in Westminster could affect the smoothness with which that legislation passes through Parliament if they join forces with the Labour Party and Conservative rebels,”

Her Edinburgh visit will be one to watch. Who will she talk to in Belfast?

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  • BonaparteOCoonassa

    Vulgar abuse – last refuge of those with no argument.

  • BonaparteOCoonassa

    Indeed? What’s your forecast for the Derby? And will it be just as far out?

    It would help immensely if you took some trouble to explain your reasoning, but I suppose that’s a bit of a stretch, given that your post seems to be based on emotional Britnationalism.

  • john millar

    Accurately forecasting the uncomfortable result of Scottish Independence is hardly abuse

  • john millar

    The “regions ” referred to are
    NI and Scotland and the choices available to them

    (PS I lived in Yorkshire a very distinctive not to say proud region with a huge sense of difference with he rest of the England. Since it is part of England it is also by definition part of the UK)

  • BonaparteOCoonassa

    You are a troll. No more replies to you except to evidence backed comments.

  • Skibo

    It is a pittance in relation to the overall tax take of the UK but as Tesco, for example, is the second largest employer in NI and declare their earnings in GB, that is a considerable amount in relation to the NI tax take.

  • john millar

    “It is a pittance in relation to the overall tax take of the UK but as Tesco, for example, is the second largest employer in NI and declare their earnings in GB, that is a considerable amount in relation to the NI tax take.”

    Corporation Tax is a minor player in the contribution to total “tax take” Income tax/NICS ( PAYE in particular) Vat and Excise duties (Particularly Hydro carbon oil) are bigggies

    Corporation tax contributes about 8% of the total tax take

    http://www.economicshelp.org/blog/4001/economics/tax-revenue-sources-in-uk/

    Based on a population of the UK at 64 million and Northern Ireland at 1.8 million (2.8%) and corporation tax take at 39 thousand Million– at best N Ireland will contribute around 1 thousand million to the UK Corporation tax take.

    Major caveats
    NI has the lowest wages in the UK
    High dependency culture on social security/benefits

    It appears unlikely they NI will contribute a proportion to the tax take equivalent to its proportion of the UK population

    PS A third of UK tax is raised in London
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/a-third-of-uk-tax-comes-from-london-report-says-a7126756.html

  • Skibo

    https://www.ifs.org.uk/publications/6881
    As you can see, the North pays more per head than Wales does. The other interesting thing is the £2000 per head of income that is not allocated across the UK.
    We pay approximately £5700 per head. That is from a much smaller salary base line. It would be interesting to see how much each person in Ireland pays.
    As for your comment on London paying a third of the UK tax, you will probably find a similar portion of NI tax is paid by Greater Belfast. This would be a given fact for most countries.
    It should be pointed out that a low wage economy will always have a high dependency on social security and benefits. Raise the wage level and the dependency on hand-outs will reduce.

  • john millar

    “£2000 per head of income that is not allocated across the UK.”

    This is “non HMRC” raised income (rates in NI, council tax charge in GB) Based on my experience and depending where you live(d) Rates on houses in NI were significantly less that cpuncil tax for similar property in GB

  • Skibo

    John, I pay over £1700 per year in rates. That is greater than the largest average council tax in GB. I was looking forward to MOM as Finance minister removing the cap on rates. My house is not worth a quarter of a million pounds yet they probably will not pay much more.