Executive Falls; Election likely to be on March 2nd

The 5pm deadline has passed and the Executive has fallen after nearly a decade in office.

The Secretary of Stare is due to speak within the next 30 mins but the election date is widely expected to be Thursday 2nd March.

This gives us a 7 week campaign.

, , ,

  • 05OCT68

    Don’t think she needs them, Labour won’t vote down article 50. Interesting that Ken Reid hinted that Brexit helped provoke SF action (DUP cock a hoop at the Brexit result & disregard for NI remainers).

  • lizmcneill

    If you have to pay for it, it might as well be gone. Free at the point of use was one of the core founding principles of the NHS.

  • Anthony O’Shea

    Almost every argument which supports the continuation of partition has at this stage pretty much collapsed.

  • Damien C Conway

    I’m very impressed by party efficiency – just met two fellas, one on a ladder, on my way home….

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/815e12ad45dd441f64e4a6cde0f4928009f9d095ccb8aba29a6371844bb5b762.jpg

  • Anthony O’Shea

    Check out the constituencies on Wiki, some of the candidates already listed for this election.

  • Damien C Conway

    Less than six hours?

  • Anthony O’Shea

    What’s a Shinnerbot?

  • lizmcneill

    The BBC article even compares it to the system in the south. Oh, BBC iPlayer, there’s an argument for staying in the UK!

  • file

    As an epitaph for the Assembly this is as good as it gets: in relation to Patsy McGlone (Deputy Speaker) trying to clear up the mess that acting Speaker Morrow made of the non-movement of the motion of no confidence in the Speaker:
    (from Hansard)
    “I have been in consultation with the Speaker’s Office and some of the senior clerks. I am going to suspend the Assembly because of the absolute mess we have arrived at to take some advice on the best way forward. There are a lot of issues and questions to be dealt with in a serious manner without the tomfoolery that has been happening here.”

    What a bunch of eejits! So long and thanks for all the fish.

  • AntrimGael

    It’s a very depressing time and the outlook just looks extremely bleak. There doesn’t seem to be any light coming at the end of a dark tunnel that will lead us to God only knows. Eamon McCann looked very downbeat on the TV earlier and he was right when he said that in a dangerous vacuum things could descend very quickly back on to the streets and you don’t need to be a genius to see what Eamon means.
    Do we want a next generation to go through all this crap again? These kids don’t know how bad the past was and it would be heartbreaking to see them experience it. Irrespective of RHI, Arlene Foster has done a lot of damage to cross community relations with her attitude since she became DUP leader. She was petty, hostile and downright ignorant and offensive towards the Nationalist community.
    Today Teresa May is to give a speech that will probably pour more woodchip on the flames. It looks like Britain is going for a hard Brexit and that isn’t good for this island. Things are starting to slip here and I really fear where it could end up. The Balkans is a warning how quickly and far this could go.

  • AntrimGael

    Sadly I agree and I can see Unionist politicians once again sabre rattling and threatening just this outcome. I hear there have already been a few rumblings in Loyalism about any future role for Dublin if direct rule comes back. While Republicans decommissioned a lot of their military hardware Loyalists didn’t and they remain armed to the teeth. If direct rule is reintroduced and border posts/checkpoints go back up I fear there WILL be a return to serious violence again.

  • Anthony O’Shea

    GOFER

  • AntrimGael

    Correct but sure isn’t that, and hasn’t it always been, the narrative of this place?

  • Fear Éireannach

    Cash for ash and cash for sash isn’t great, but perhaps these things can be overcome, they are very much part a typical part of the NI situation. But Brexit is an external threat, one that has damaged the peace process by the DUP supporting it and one that will greatly damage the process if there is political harassment of people in border areas at the same time as the economy there is undermined.
    Eamon McCann is personally responsible for a large part of the problem as he refused to support a motion that NI be given special consideration in the Brexit process. Scoring points against SF was more important to him than the economic dislocation on this island. Prospects will be improved if he is not re-elected, the British may not listen to the assembly on Brexit, but an assembly that refuses to even ask for mitigation of the damage is a waste of space and McCann’s replacement may help prevent this.

  • Anthony O’Shea

    You are a ‘themmun’ of sorts. In fact you are the worst of ‘themmuns’ because you cannot be pigeon holed, labelled appropriately or reasonably explained to the lodge kin. I would have thought that was clear enough after Unionists attacks on Alliance after the Fleg issue. From a DUP Unionist point of view you are one of them. From a Nationalist point of view you are not one of them, nor are you one of usssuns.

  • AntrimGael

    The point is that if direct rule comes back and dissidents step up their campaign OR if Dublin gets a greater role in the North Smiley’s People would use their Loyalist satellites to do their dirty work again as they always have. Britain’s sinister agencies have their own agenda.

  • Fear Éireannach

    The HSE did fund the new cancer unit in Derry, but there is much more to be done. What cross border connection does Enniskillen hospital have for instance?

  • Croiteir

    Bring it on then, time for this bluff to be called.

  • Eugene Mcdonnell

    My take on the upcoming election is this: the RHI scandal will be quickly and conveniently forgotten about by most of the unionist community whenever the ‘Trojan horse/United Ireland by stealth’ message is repeated and repeated by every DUP candidate on tv/radio adnauseum for the next month and a half.

    Nothing scares the S**t out of unionists more than a mention of sinn fein/united Ireland in the same sentence. The DUP will say they are stronger on the union than the UUP, and a vote for the UUP is a vote for the slippery slope of a United Ireland. It has begun in earnest already folks. The Gerry Adams/Trojan horse strategy will be referenced endlessly by the DUP. They will emerge from this election unscathed and possibly even strengthened.

    Sinn Fein, barely concealing their smug attitude that the DUP will be get their just deserts at the ballot box, will entrench unionist resolve to keep the DUP at the top and to keep the door tightly shut on Sinn Fein ever becoming the largest party. Their willingness to pull the plug will be judged as a mistake as ‘people before profit’ make significantly more gains as the nationalist/republican electorate see through the game being played by the shinners. Nationalists aren’t buying the whole ‘equality agenda’ anymore Gerry. It’s sounding worse than the record John Hume used to play on loop all those years ago. The SDLP and UUP will come limping home as usual, badly beaten and saying they need to regroup and re-evaluate, when really what they need to do is pack it in. They are irrelevant and simply don’t offer a credible enough alternative to joe public.

    It’s pretty crude and pretty simple folks. This election, more so than most in recent years will be fought on the constitutional issue. Sinn Fein will be the losers, the DUP will, unfortunately, be the winners, along with people before profit, who’s support will grow again.

  • 1729torus

    Most likely outcome is DR w/ so much input from Dublin that it ends up being JA in practice.

  • J D

    Those rumblings are just a large Ulster fry making it’s pilgrimage.

  • Croiteir

    I will see your DUP housing and raise you a SF ferry and harbour, I suppose at the end of the day the people of Rathlin benefit. I am a cynic inn these matters I admit but is this an attempt to build up a SF councillor wannabee?

  • AntrimGael

    If only JD if only. Loyalists have shown that they can kill for Britain and not only get off but decorated for it. The Mount Vernon UVF, Glenanne gang, Mid Ulster LVF, Brian Nelson. Don’t be under the illusion Britain wouldn’t use them again to do their dirty work.

  • AntrimGael

    If we are being realistic and honest Loyalists have the Nationalist community outgunned by a distance. Not only have they still got their weapons but Unionism here holds something like 120,000 guns certificates.

  • J D

    “The South wouldn’t touch that scenario with a barge pole, and who could blame it?”

    Why do Unionists keeping imagining this fantasy to be true? Although it is slightly less bizarre than the fantasy that there isn’t now, nor ever has been, a giant majority in favour of re-unification in the south. Despite every single poll on the issue making it clear the south would leap at the opportunity to unify our nation.

    If Unionism wants to start violence from their position of weakness then there is nothing we can do to stop them from starting. But they will be sat on and they won’t have the British Army, Police and Military Intelligence to protect them. They will not last a week.

    That’s if the paper tiger does anything but through empty beer cans at the TV screen and yell obscenities as the Union Jack comes down and the Tricolour goes up over Stormont.

  • J D

    Without the RUC, UDA, BA on the ground? Whole different kettle of fish.

  • Croiteir

    I have a certificate, I shot with a loose grouping of about 20 people, about 15 are nationalists, how do you know that there are 120,000 unionists who want to fight with certificates.

  • J D

    Are people really concerned about the Loyalist doomsday retreat east of the Bann and genocide endgame plan from the 70s actually being carried out?

  • J D

    Well the records show that the overwhelming preponderance of cert holders were Unionist. Unless that’s changed dramatically in the last 10 years.

  • Croiteir

    It would not be their dirty work any more though

  • AntrimGael

    I’m not personally as I lived through a lot of the crap in the 70’s and 80’s but I do believe that there are elements of Loyalism and Unionism who would itch for such a scenario. They also have their cronies within the British political, military and Intelligence Establishments who see the North, and Irish Republicans, as ‘unfinished business’.

  • AntrimGael

    Well they are not in South Down or North Antrim shooting rabbits every week.

  • AntrimGael

    It hasnt. They say the Ards Peninsula is just one big Loyalist arms dump.

  • J D

    I would think now that most of the real hard nuts have aged out or died off – both on the streets and behind the desks.

    Look at the ground Unionism has lost the last 20 years and the level of carnage associated. Look at the Flegger protests. In another five years, what will they be capable of?

    And we have to do it. It is the only way to fix the place.

  • Lionel Hutz

    I counted about £150k that could be described as CNR associated groups. Thats on just what i see at a glance. Im sure theres more.

    Im Not counting any churche halls either. Not sure what they are.

  • T.E.Lawrence

    10th February 2017 !

  • woodkerne

    To my mind the main issues, over the interim to longer term, are the welcome absence of political violence that was facilitated by the republican movement’s eventual disavowal of ‘physical force’ (premised on acknowledgement of the British state’s formal neutrality on partition) and, as a corollary to the constitutionalization of SF, a steady elimination of the vestiges of sectarian exclusion on which the state was founded, culminating in the corrections represented by the Belfast Agreement. The incompetence and parochialism of local politicians in the meantime is surely a symptom not of a cause of the slow transition to a politics of class and socioeconomic interests rather than survival of a polity and civil society dominated by the residual clientism of sectarian blocs. The keyword in all of this it seems to me is residual.

  • Granni Trixie

    Thanks for helping me clear that up.

    For some reason I am recalling an incident with my father after either the ceasefire or the GFA – I felt some reconciliatory gesture was called for and asked him would we go for a pint to the felons club. He said “no,Granni Trixie, you couldn’t hack it”.

  • Jag

    I put an x beside the four themmuns and sorted the list so the four appear at the top of the table above, what have I missed?

  • johnny lately

    I hear where your coming from AG and a return to direct rule would lead to demands for a border poll and yes Smileys people would probably do as they have always done, same old same old, but your describing a situation like in the dying days of the apartheid regime in South Africa Im sure you can remember the scenes on TV when those who refused to accept change and took up arms to resist were very quickly resisted themselves, they did not last long.

  • Nevin

    Don’t be diverted by the drones, Croiteur; they can work themselves up into an awful tizz!

    Those stories about collapsible stone tables and floating tables happened under a joint DUP watch; the earlier ferry stories happened initially under a SF watch and later under a UUP one. The new ferries for Strangford and Ballycastle were initiated under a UUP watch but it’s currently a SF one. Thanks to a design blunder cars were unable to embark and disembark from the new Strangford ferry at high tide! When I saw the four design options for a new Ballycastle ferry I was able to correct a simple blunder. Rathlin harbour can accommodate vessels with a draft of 1.4 metres or less and no one on the project team had spotted that one of the options they claimed could enter the harbour had a draft of, er, more than that! A new slip-way is currently under construction at Rathlin to accommodate the Spirit of Rathlin, the new ferry. It remains to be seen whether or not there are any more glitches.

  • Nevin

    Anthony, there’s a joke in there; it’s buried in plain sight!

  • the keep

    Then there will be no joint rule chum.

  • the keep

    I think you will find that it was SF that forced direct rule not unionism.

  • Nevin

    How are your sums, Granni?

    The sums for the Rathlin ferry don’t seem to add up:

    £7m for operator contract + £2.8 m for Spirit of Rathlin + £1 m for harbour works = £10.8 m

    Dept of Finance: CPD on Friday £12.7 m. [actually £12,689,546.40]

    You could buy two catamarans for the difference – unless I’ve messed up. Perhaps there’s a £2 m typo.

  • Reader

    Anthony O’Shea: What’s a Shinnerbot?
    It’s like a Putinbot but unpaid.

  • Granni Trixie

    Thanks – I get it now.

  • Nevin

    townieman provided a link after you posted to some information released by the Department of Finance on Friday past.

  • ted hagan

    And can you not see beyond that, or is it some sort of comfort food?

  • Nevin

    My apologies, Granni, I’m quite confused now!

  • oval

    Ok can you source figures to back this up?