A form of political storytelling that comes without delivery is also part of ‘the narrative’…

Saturday morning, so this is just brief and in passing… First this from our own IJP…

Well, it gets a mention here, just two minutes in…

Note Mike Nesbitt pointing out another telling detail, the fact that the leader of Sinn Fein on Belfast City Council has poo-pooed the idea that corporation tax will ever see the light of day (noted earlier in the week on Nolan)…

And now, Colum Eastwood’s first public platform piece as SDLP leader in yesteday’s Irish News…

SINN Féin are famed for telling a good story. Credit where credit is due, I think they’ve been pretty good at it too. The heart of their narrative told us they were the best negotiators in the land.

That they and they alone were the strong men, that they and they alone would stay in the room for however long it took. That they and they alone wouldn’t budge until their bottom lines were met.

Since the beginning of their political journey they’ve voiced that story with an abundance of self-confidence and with very little humility.

It’s been a good story and they won plenty of votes on the back of it. But even the best of stories come to an end. Last week’s so-called ‘Fresh Start’ deal definitively marked that end.

Much of that deal has now been proven to be so transparently awful that Sinn Féin’s chief negotiators are finding it difficult to hide their shame. And ashamed they should be.

After promising for two years that they’d stand up to the Tories and fight the good fight, they’ve not only completely capitulated on their promises, they’ve surrendered their responsibilities to none other than George Osborne.

They genuinely convinced many of this society’s most vulnerable that their benefits would be protected. It is no wonder these same people are now so genuinely angry.

On welfare reform, they’ve negotiated away around £240 million of protections for the most vulnerable.

Mick is founding editor of Slugger. He has written papers on the impacts of the Internet on politics and the wider media and is a regular guest and speaking events across Ireland, the UK and Europe. Twitter: @MickFealty