The Greek Deal…A final act of subversion?

John O’Donovan, Radio Producer, presenter and lecturer in media says that Greece now needs an election before any deal can be agreed.

After a victorious referendum result that saw the Greek people defeat an austerity deal by a clear mandate of 61%, Greece has now been bounced into what appears to be an even more swingeing bailout deal. The third bailout deal will keep Greece in the Eurozone, if it is passed in the Greek Parliament by Wednesday, but at a substantial cost to sovereignty and national autonomy. As part of the ‘agreement’ thrashed out in Brussels, Greece will be in receipt of an €86 billion bailout, but the condition at Germanys insistence that €50 billion worth of Greek state assets will be placed in a trust to directly pay down debts beggars belief. If reports are to be believed it is akin to the Aran Islands being offered up by the Irish state to placate the monolith that the power hungry European elite has now become.

The fact that Tsipras managed to convince ‘diplomats’ at the heart of Europe to manage the structure in Athens rather than in Luxembourg is of little concession to the Greek people. The revelation that the Luxembourg institution is a wholly owned subsidiary of German National Bank, KfW, that is chaired by Wolfgang Schauble, is truly distressing and highlights what sort of a Europe spearheaded by Germany that we are so called members of. The fact that this humiliation for Greece was averted is of little comfort for a Prime Minister, a Government and a nation that has been battered bruised and destroyed by a subversion of democracy and national sovereignty.
Whatever the outcome of the remainder of this week, surely the whole concept of the European Union project that purported to espouse values to avoid conflict and deliver social justice is now nothing more than an incoherent smokescreen that is only concerned with cruel and corrosive financial logic without any understanding of human suffering and democracy. The only realistic option now is for Alexis Tsipras to call a snap election and let the Greek people decide if they wish to agree to this extremely harsh deal. It is inconceivable that the Greek Parliament can pass these measures after the Greek people voted against measures that were less harsh in the recent referendum.

Alexis Tsipras today argued that, “We resisted demands for the transfer of state assets abroad and averted a banking collapse which had been meticulously planned.”, the fact that the EU planned the Greek banking collapse and it was averted through negotiation, says a lot about the European Unions approach to partnership amongst member states. Furthermore, what is most concerning for the Greek people awaiting the reopening and recapitalisation of their banks is the statement from the Euro Summit that, ‘The Euro Summit is aware that a rapid decision on a new programme is a condition to allow banks to reopen…The ECB/SSM will conduct a comprehensive assessment after the summer’, so what will this mean in practical terms?

We have seen demands for complete capitulation from Tsipras and his Government by the EU and the actions are nothing less than a Coup to overthrow a legally elected Government in Greece and a stripping of the countries national assets. There is a EU behavioural trend here, as Angela Merkel said the deal was ‘completely in line’ with other programmes agreed upon, such as the ones met with Ireland. What we can see from this simple statement is that the Irish Government was also bullied and berated into capitulating to the then imposed bailout terms or face fierce vindictiveness and financial ruin for the country. This is not to excuse the Irish Government of the time but rather to highlight the fact that this European Union project is beyond saving and it is only a matter of time before the smaller countries stand up to the European elites and cry stop.

The actions of Germany and their cohort in the kernel of European power have finally overstepped the mark by initiating a coup and an over throw of democratic principles. The people of Greece must now decide in fresh elections whether they want a Greek exit from the EU or if they want to their new Government to implement these vindictive new bailout terms.

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  • GEF

    The big question remains, did former Greek governments bring this all on themselves by getting their country into so much debt in the last five years?

  • More utter nonsense.

    “It is inconceivable that the Greek Parliament can pass these measures after the Greek people voted against measures that were less harsh in the recent referendum.”

    We’ll find out on Wednesday.

  • John O’Donovan

    It may well pass on Wednesday Pete, but most likely without support of many Syriza & Government members. This will most likely trigger an election sooner rather than later & Greek people already seem unhappy with the agreement. J.

  • So it is ‘conceivable’, after all.

    As I said, utter nonsense.

    #ThisisNOTaCoup

  • John O’Donovan

    Let’s see how Wednesday goes.

  • That would have been my advice to begin with.

  • John Calvert

    Yes

  • chrisjones2

    Complete tripe

    “We have seen demands for complete capitulation from Tsipras and his Government by the EU and the actions are nothing less than a Coup to overthrow a legally elected Government in Greece and a stripping of the countries national assets.”

    They owe the money to the rest of Europe. They lied. The presented false accounts. They were crooks. They got caught and now they have to pay

    “There is a EU behavioural trend here, as Angela Merkel said the deal was ‘completely in line’ with other programmes agreed upon, such as the ones met with Ireland. ”

    So what? For the stability of the Euro that is a good thing

    “What we can see from this simple statement is that the Irish Government was also bullied and berated into capitulating to the then imposed bailout terms or face fierce vindictiveness and financial ruin for the country. ”

    Not vindictiveness buit a desire to get their money back. Why should German tax payers pay for Greeks to retire at 50 and avoid paying their VAT bills?

    “This is not to excuse the Irish Government of the time but rather to highlight the fact that this European Union project is beyond saving and it is only a matter of time before the smaller countries stand up to the European elites and cry stop.”

    Winge away. When you joined the Euro you signed sovereignty away.

    “The actions of Germany and their cohort in the kernel of European power have finally overstepped the mark by initiating a coup and an over throw of democratic principles.”

    More tripe. Greece has a choice. Do the deal and stay in the Euro and get help. Dont do it and crash out

    ” The people of Greece must now decide in fresh elections whether they want a Greek exit from the EU or if they want to their new Government to implement these vindictive new bailout terms.”

    No time for that. They have 3 days or ECB pulls the plug. Big boys rules and even the Finns wouldn’t support them

  • chrisjones2

    Yep ….and by electing crooks who ran a huge deficit squandered every chance to reform

    Hmmmmm ….where else can I see a parallel?

  • terence patrick hewett

    Wolfgang Münchau of the FT sums it up:

    “A few things that many of us took for granted, and that some of us believed in, ended in a single weekend. By forcing Alexis Tsipras into a humiliating defeat, Greece’s creditors have done a lot more than bring about regime change in Greece or endanger its relations with the Eurozone. They have destroyed the Eurozone as we know it and demolished the idea of a monetary union as a step towards a democratic political union.

    In doing so they reverted to the nationalist European power struggles of the 19th and early 20th century. They demoted the Eurozone into a toxic fixed exchange-rate system, with a shared single currency, run in the interests of Germany, held together by the threat of absolute destitution for those who challenge the prevailing order. The best thing that can be said of the weekend is the brutal honesty of those perpetrating this regime change.”

    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/e38a452e-26f2-11e5-bd83-71cb60e8f08c.html#axzz3fmvGIIBK

  • chrisjones2

    “They have destroyed the Eurozone as we know it and demolished the idea of a monetary union as a step towards a democratic political union.”

    ….quelle horreur!!!!

    “they reverted to the nationalist European power struggles of the 19th and early 20th century.”

    …blame the French who saw it as an opportunity to damage Merkel politically and dump the debt onto Germany .,…in a fraternal European way

    “the threat of absolute destitution for those who challenge the prevailing order.”

    surely you meant “the threat of absolute destitution for those who don’t pay their debts”

  • terence patrick hewett

    Not me Wolfgang.

  • 23×7

    Tripe x3. The Greeks are being made the scapegoats for the complete clusterfuck that is the euro project. The agreement will be a pyrrhic victory for Germany. This negotiation has been a disaster for democracy in Europe, the EU itself and in a blast from the past has worryingly shown German leaders to be vindictive bullys. The EU was initially set up as a political project rather than an economic one. That seems to have been completely forgotten.

    Formerly pro European I will be happily voting out in the UK referendum. A fresh start to the EU project is needed which a UK exit may deliver.

  • 23×7

    Nope. You may have heard about the Euro project. Otherwise known as the single currency. That’s what has caused this mess. Ignore the cultural stereotypes paraded above.

  • terence patrick hewett

    Cameron narrowly won the May 2015 general election; he attempts to re-negotiate the UK’s relationship with the EU and makes the expected pigs-ear of it. The UK exits the EU after a referendum, triggering a Scottish exit from the UK. A constitutional crisis occurs which inspires an Anglo-Celtic Federation of independent nations, trading with the world. The challenge inspires science and industry and the Federation becomes highly competitive, successful and rich and to everyone’s surprise the Republic of Ireland joins leaving Scotland isolated and shackled to the corpse of the EU. Scotland applies to join but receives the reply that a referendum of all the constituent nations will have to be held. Brittany then declares UDI and applies to join their Celtic brethren in Cornouailles shortly afterwards followed by Normandie, Picardie, and the Pas de Calais. The Hundred Years War starts all over. Scotland cannot resist the temptation of wholesale arson, rapine, pillage and slaughter and is welcomed into the Federation.

  • chrisjones2

    I dont disagree on the euro. Trying to merge such divergent economies was bad enough but when one state falsified its accounts and hid accumulating debt it was bound to end this way The real failure was in not dealing with it sooner when it might have been managable.

  • chrisjones2

    What cultural stereotypes are you suggesting?