Greece: bitter pills & ill-wills

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Of the grand, ambitious projects embarked-upon on the European continent over the last three decades two highly visible examples were recalled today in Brussels: football’s Champions League and the Single European Currency.

Whatever they have in common there is one crucial difference in joining either of these prestigious clubs, in the Euro one can gain promotion but there is no relegation. Countries simply don’t drop-out of the Euro if they fail to finish with enough points, only to return after a more successful season.

For Greece having gained full-membership of the Euro at the second attempt in 2001 there is no agreed mechanism, monetary or otherwise for its expulsion, it may finish bottom of the tables but there is nothing in the rule book about sending them back to the lower leagues.

Commission President Juncker couldn’t resist the temptation to compare them today saying he didn’t want to see Greece “play in the second division”.

How Greece and the Eurozone emerge from this current impasse will depend not only on the machinations of markets or the balancing of books but ultimately upon the same force that brought the Euro and the EU into being in the first place: the political will of its members.

Accessing more liquidity in Greece’s beleaguered banks is one thing, drawing-down favour in Brussels is another and in Brussels this weekend the Syriza-led government was finding that tough.

Saturday’s emergency Eurogroup meeting in Brussels ended in acrimony with a statement saying that Athens had rejected the deal on offer and ended in uncharacteristically ominous fashion, reading:

[The statement is adopted by ministers from the euro area Member States, except Greece].

It is not only the Commission and the bigger Eurozone countries like Germany who may be losing patience with Athens’ leftist government. The Syriza-led government has yet to win-over other Eurozone countries who’ve had to take similar pills.

To reverse this Yanis Varoufakis, Greece’s dashing finance minister, pitched for Irish sympathies, in an article in the Irish Times:

“Irish readers need no reminder of the indignity that befalls a people forced to forfeit their sovereignty in the midst of an economic depression. They may, however, be justified to look at the never-ending Greek crisis and allow themselves a feeling of mild superiority, on the basis that the Irish suffered quietly, swallowed the bitter pill of austerity and are now getting out of the woods”

But it seems neither Enda Kenny or his finance Minister Michael Noonan were reading.

The Taoiseach repeated at a Brussels summit on Thursday that Ireland was not prepared to support debt-relief for the Greeks and offered some advice for Varoufakis and co; 

“We put up alternatives to those measures that were proposed in order to keep a pro-growth policy and to make our country competitive and to provide jobs for our people.”

This was echoed by the EU’s financial stability Commissioner, who today tweeted that Greece should “shoulder responsibility” as Ireland had. Spain’s Prime Minister and his Greek counterpart traded further insults at the recent Brussels summit, Tsipras had previously accused Spain and Portugal of lining-up against his government.

Many suspect that this has more to do with elections in Spain and Portugal later this year and for the Dáil next Spring, where in each country parties who style themselves on Greece’s Syriza will attempt to topple the incumbent conservatives and their prevailing economic orthodoxy.

The ballot box will have its say sooner rather than that however, with Tsipras’ referendum this coming Saturday.

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Many in Brussels hope that if Alex Tsipras’ gamble fails then fresh elections in Greece (after 6 governments in as many years) could shuffle the deck to a more accommodating position, such as replacing the nationalist-minded ANEL with the more pro-European Potami in any Syriza-led government.

Few in the UK can blame Tsipras for calling a referendum on Brussels’ terms, after all it’s what David Cameron has done. But the British prime Minister could have told him that doesn’t always get you what you want, earlier this week Cameron practically admitted as much by rowing-back from his hope of selling EU Treaty change in the UK’s referendum.

If the ultimate ends of any Grexit or Brexit are the same, their perception is often so different. To many the Brexit is the product of British internal myopia, a personal inability to come to terms with the project at large.

For Greece the thinking goes that, through its own mistakes the country has failed to deliver-on its membership criteria, it didn’t read the rules properly and now it’s costing us, time for them to go.

This unkind (and inaccurate) narrative understandably doesn’t sit well with Greeks, who after years of austerity can’t stand the notion that others have rolled-up their sleeves while they have put-up their feet.

Conservative economists have repeated the Thatcherite maxim that the Greeks have simply run-out of other people’s money, and must pay. But any change to Greece’s position in the Eurozone would require them to exhaust something more valuable: the political will and support of their peers.

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  • Chris Jones

    “can’t stand the notion that others have rolled-up their sleeves while they have put-up their feet.”

    Its not just that. They lied on entry and falsified their national accounts for year to hide mounting debts

  • terence patrick hewett

    Nothing epitomises the sclerotic EU than the great Uber farce in France: arrest people for having the temerity to provide a competitive service: pathetic. If Greece puts a stake through the rotting un-dead heart of the EU I will campaign to send the Elgin marbles back.

  • terence patrick hewett

    The King’s New Clothes

    This is the story of the King’s new clothes.

    Now there was once a king who was absolutely insane about
    new clothes and one day, two swindlers came to sell him what
    they said was a magic suit of clothes. Now, they held up this
    particular garment and they said, “Your Majesty, this is a magic suit.”

    Well, the truth of the matter is, there was no suit there at all.
    But the swindlers were very smart, and they said,
    “Your Majesty, to a wise man this is a beautiful raiment
    but to a fool it is absolutely invisible.”
    Naturally, the King not wanting to appear a fool, said:

    “Isn’t it grand! Isn’t it fine! Look at the cut, the style, the line!
    The suit of clothes is altogether, but altogether it’s altogether
    The most remarkable suit of clothes that I have ever seen.
    These eyes of mine at once determined
    The sleeves are velvet, the cape is ermine
    The hose are blue and the doublet is a lovely shade of green
    Somebody send for the Queen”

    Well they sent for the Queen and they quickly explained to her
    about the magic suit of clothes. And naturally,
    the Queen not wanting to appear a fool, said:

    “Well, isn’t it oh! Isn’t it rich! Look at the charm of every stitch!
    The suit of clothes is altogether, but altogether it’s altogether
    The most remarkable suit of clothes that I have ever seen
    These eyes of mine at once determined
    The sleeves are velvet, the cape is ermine
    The hose are blue and the doublet is a lovely shade of green

    Summon the court to convene”

    Well the court convened, and you never saw in your life
    as many people as were at that court. All the ambassadors,
    the dukes, the earls, the counts, it was just packed with people,

    and they were all told about the magic suit of clothes.
    And after they were told they
    naturally didn’t want to appear fools and they said:
    “Isn’t it ohhh! Isn’t it ahhh! Isn’t it absolutely wheee!

    The suit of clothes is altogether, but altogether, it’s altogether
    The most remarkable suit of clothes a tailor ever made
    Now quickly, put it altogether
    With gloves of leather and hat and feather
    It’s altogether the thing to wear in Saturday’s parade
    Leading the royal brigade”

    Now Saturday came and the streets were just
    lined with thousands and thousands and thousands of people.
    And they all were cheering as the artillery came by, the infantry marched by,
    the cavalry galloped by. And everybody was cheering like mad,
    except one little boy. You see, he hadn’t heard about
    the magic suit and didn’t know what he was supposed to see.

    Well, as the King came by the little boy looked and, horrified, said:

    “Look at the King! Look at the the King! Look at the King, the King, the King!
    The King is in the altogether, but altogether, the altogether
    He’s altogether as naked as the day that he was born
    The King is in the altogether, but altogether, the altogether
    It’s altogether the very least the King has ever worn”

    Summon the court physician! Call an intermission!
    His majesty is wide open to ridicule and scorn.

    The King is in the altogether, but all together, the altogether
    He’s altogether as naked as the day that he was born

    And it’s altogether too chilly a morn</i.

  • terence patrick hewett

    Alex and Yanis have got to be politicians of the year: they had the courage to call the bluff of the EU nomenclatura and exposed it as the fraud that it is and gave us all a great deal of amusement on the way. This exposure will not have gone un-noticed: expect more of the same from all the usual suspects.

  • Rubbish.
    Particularly, but not only, this.

    Few in the UK can blame Tsipras for calling a referendum on Brussels’ terms, after all it’s what David Cameron has done.

  • Robin Keogh

    The EU leaders are determined to enforce measures on Greece that are simply too destructive. Tsipras and Yanis are fully aware that both their options will Cripple Greece for years. Exiting the Euro or accepting the EU’s conditions. Both are catastrophic options. Its sad that europes leaders would happily sacrifice the Greek people and the billions owed by Greece for no other reason than saving their bacon at home. A pathetic example of how far removed our political culture is from humanity.