Trinity academic to become first woman cardinal shock!

No, Not Crocodile Dundee’s soon to be ex -wife but the vice provost of Trinity College Dublin. A real Sunday flyer

From the Sunday Times (£)

SHE may be a woman, married, a feminist and only 49, but an Irish theologian called Linda Hogan is being tipped as the Vatican’s first lady in red.

There has never been a female cardinal, but since Pope Francis took charge in Rome eight months ago and emerged as a social liberal the unthinkable has become possible.

Speculation is rampant that the reformist Argentinian Pope will invite a woman to don the red hat and sit in the Holy See’s papal conclave, which will pick his successor one day. In theory she could become pope herself.

The new Pope has repeatedly said he wants to increase the role of women in the church and that it needs to develop “a truly deep theology of women”.

The Washington Post first picked up the story from Juan Arias, a former priest from Brazil, who wrote in the Spanish newspaper El Pais in September that it was “not a joke”. After a slight delay its’ gone viral.

The Protect the Pope Catholic website adds some context

In the U.S., the Rev. James Keenan, a fellow Jesuit and a well-regarded moral theologian at Boston College, started a post on his Facebook page soliciting nominees for the first female cardinal. Keenan said he wrote the post mainly as a way to recognize the many women who would be “great candidates.” On his list: Linda Hogan, a professor of ecumenics at Trinity College Dublin; Sister Teresa Okure, a theology professor at the Catholic Institute of West Africa in Nigeria; and Maryanne Loughry, associate director of the Jesuit Refugee Service in Australia.’

Prof Linda Hogan is a signatory of the so called ‘Catholic Scholars Jubilee Declaration on Authority in the Catholic Church’ and has spoken out against the CDF disciplinary actions against six dissenting Irish priests, including Fr Tony Flannery. Prof Hogan has put her name to the following statement:

‘A principal source of present-day stagnation lies in misunderstanding and abuse affecting the exercise of authority in our Church. Specifically, the following issues require urgent redress: The role of the papacy needs to be clearly re-defined in line with Christ’s intentions. As supreme pastor, unifier and prime witness to faith, the pope contributes substantially to the health of the universal church. However, his authority may never obscure, diminish or suppress the authentic authority directly given by Christ to all members of the people of God. Bishops are vicars of Christ, not vicars of the pope. They carry immediate responsibility for people in their dioceses, and joint responsibility, with other bishops and the pope, for the world-wide community of faith.

 

Protect the Pope however manages to contain its excitement

Protect the Pope comment: This has got to be one of the most bizarre stories yet to emerge about the pontificate of Francis which shows the near hysterical fever pitch among dissenters projecting their ‘dream reforms’ onto the Holy Father. The sentence that Prof. Linda Hogan, as cardinal, would be ‘eligible to cast a vote in the election of the next pope’ is such as huge reach as to be humorous

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  • sherdy

    As the title ‘pope’ is derived from ‘papa’ the election of a woman should then receive a title derived from ‘mama’.
    Or, recognising her present academic achievements, she might be named ‘prof papa’. I don’t think ‘Lady Linda’ would really be appropriate.
    Ah damn, its going to be too much trouble – lets just forget about it.

  • ArdoyneUnionist
  • Charles_Gould

    Would be a step in the right direction.

  • Taoiseach

    Did I miss the winter and stumble into April Fools Day? What a load of crap to put on the front page of a newspaper. If Pope Francis decided in a fit of something to appoint a female cardinal, having changed canon law to provide for the possibility, there is not a chance in any parallel universe of Linda Hogan being one. Is she even a Catholic?

  • Charles_Gould

    This is actually very encouraging. If bishops and ultimately popes can be women it should help with attitudes to contraception divorce and abortion, and hopefully the ban on priests getting married. A new leftist agenda at the very top of the Catholic church.

    As the proportion of the population in Ireland that is catholic falls, year on year, the people are voting that change is needed.

  • Charles_Gould

    Context: Nearly 100 years after we in the UK gave women the vote, Catholic groups are still claiming that a woman being “eligible to cast a vote in the election of the next pope” is “such as huge reach as to be humorous”.

  • Newman

    What the media article and the reaction to it reveal is that there is invincible ignorance on most matters Catholic. The prescription by Charles of the post modern panacea…if we could all have complete autonomy and do pretty much what we like sexually all would be well and people would flock back to the church… is as predictable as it is risible .The church survives because it does not conform itself to the wisdom of the world.

  • Caoimhín

    Mr. Gould,

    Would you ever have a titter of wit? This is ludicrous speculation.

    “…attitudes to contraception divorce and abortion, and hopefully the ban on priests getting married.”

    All of which exist in the Church of England as it rapidly withers on the vine. A prescription of “do whatever you want” is not only actively harmful to society but would undermine the theological integrity maintained by the Church for the last two thousand years.

    The Church must be counter-cultural to survive, and must endure the slings and arrows which consequently come its way.

  • Coll Ciotach

    I have heard of delusion but now I think I have seen it defined

  • Charles_Gould

    At some point this sort of thing will happen: women entering the church and ultimately becoming pope, priests etc.

  • Taoiseach

    I think, Charles, you’ll find there are already lots of women in the Church. My mother, my wife, my sisters, my daughters – all entered the Church on the day of their baptisms the same as the men.

    None of them, today or at any date in the future will become priests or bishops or Popes. Just as Jesus won’t become a woman, the Eucharist will require bread and wine, and 2+2 will continue to equal 4.

    Abortion will always be gravely sinful, along with contraception. Marriage will remain a union between a man and a woman. We’ve had 2,000 years of people telling us the Church should do this or that and eventually they wise up and go away or die and discover the truth for themselves.

  • Charles_Gould

    Taoiseach

    I am getting the impression you may be being ironic in that post, but if not then … Women are not second class. They are equals.

  • Caoimhín

    Mr. Gould,

    Wow, that’s very profound of you. Of course women are equal, but men and women are also different and fulfil different social functions. That is self evident. Our Lord chose 12 men to be his apostles as a reflection of their social function. He also gave his mother and other women positions of pre-eminent spiritual importance – but he did not ordain them as his apostles.

    The Church has no authority or power to ordain women. It is a simple impossibility. Women are of equal standing and importance to men and perform important functions in the works and governance
    of the Church. The sacramental priesthood was deliberately reserved for men, much in the same way that motherhood was reserved for women. A woman can no more be a priest or than a man can be with child.

  • Charles_Gould

    Cao

    ” Our Lord chose 12 men to be his apostles as a reflection of their social function. He also gave his mother and other women positions of pre-eminent spiritual importance – but he did not ordain them as his apostles.”

    I would argue that that was just a reflection of the social mores of the time; I am sure that Jesus was not someone who would discriminate against women.

  • Caoimhín

    You might argue that, even though Jesus broke so many social taboos in his time, and even though he was the son of God he just wasn’t brave enough to tackle backward, misogynistic sexism… not like you.

    Or he valued equality but recognised that man and woman, created equal, are different.

  • Comrade Stalin

    Taoiseach,

    It’s good to see a traditionalist. Despite your characterization, the modern church is nothing like it was 2000 years ago. Over the centuries all kinds of old ideas (opposition to usury, or purgatory for example; or Vatican II innovations such as being nice to Jews and Protestants, the Latin mass, eating meat on Friday etc) have gone out the window, and new ideas (opposition to abortion – 18th century or thereabouts) have been incorporated and packaged up for delivery from the pulpit.

    The reason why the church changes with the times is because it has to remain relevant in people’s lives. If it tries to stand against the tides of society it will disintegrate – as it is already showing signs of doing. The abortion debate is turning against the church in Ireland, and throughout the Western world the church has lost the debate.

    As for your opinions on contraception, it’s a hell of a thing to hear such views these days from a father of daughters. I hope for their sake one of them doesn’t “get into trouble” – your household sounds like it must be a barrel of laughs already.

    Caoimhín

    Or he valued equality but recognised that man and woman, created equal, are different.

    What happens if a woman hears a calling from God to join the vocation ?

  • Greenflag

    There’ll probably be a female Pope long before there is a Catholic male or female on the English throne . Why women put up with the RC Churches misogyny is beyond me 🙁

    The RC Church is a non democratic non transparent autocracy which is led from the top down .

    “A woman can no more be a priest or than a man can be with child. ”

    Infantile lunacy . Women are priests in the Lutheran and Episcopalian and Anglican churches . And while it remains true that a man can’t be with child the sad fact remains that many RC priests may not have been with child but had no problem in fathering children by their housekeepers or mistresses as per the ex Bishop of Galway .

    Heres the Saint of Glendalough the bould Kevin or should that be Caomhin on the role of women in ancient Irish society

    In Glendalough lived an old saint
    Renowned for learning and piety
    His manners was curious and quaint
    And he looked upon girls with disparity

    Fol di dol fol di fol day
    Fol di dol rol di dol ad dy
    Fol di dol rol di dol day
    Fol di dol rol di dol ad dy

    “Oh, get out o’ me way” said the saint
    For I am a man of great piety
    And me good manners I wouldn’t taint
    Not by mixing with female society

    The full monty linked below 😉

    http://www.kinglaoghaire.com/site/lyrics/song_480.html

    In the name of the Father and the Son and into the hole you go and thats it , No comebacks ,

  • Taoiseach

    It always amuses me when pro-choicers try to tell Catholics what their church’s position is on abortion. The Church has been consistently opposed to abortion since day one. What’s changed is knowledge of biology and the penalties associated with it. Pro-choicers all think their experts in Thomas Aquinas and ensoulment. They aren’t and at no stage in history has the Church been supportive in any shape or form of a right to abortion at any stage in the development of an unborn child.

    Jesus was extremely radical, turning The Law on its head, revealing that God was a trinity and that the poor were beloved by God. Some people can convince themselves that he didn’t appoint female apostles out of fear. I’m not buying it and the Church has declared that it is impossible to ordain women. So that’s that. If you don’t like it, go somewhere else. As mentioned there are Lutherans and Anglicans to cater for those beliefs. They’ll accept your contraceptive views and probably pander to abortion as well.

    As for my daughters and contraception. Which would I prefer, that they regard themselves as sex objects or that they get married and have children?

  • David Crookes

    If you want to kill a church off, persuade it to make common cause with unbelieving Sunday paper intellectuals, hold up the old Woolworths ‘pick-n-mix’ as the model for good theology, and keep quiet about the fact that Woolworths has gone out of business.

  • Greenflag

    Jesus was a radical Jew of his time and long before the Christians ‘sanitised ‘ his teachings he would have been described as a zealot -a Jewish nationalist zealot .

    Heres an excerpt from the latest Jesus studies for anyone interested .

    The zeal in question is both religious and political. At a time when this kind of zealotry is associated predominantly with Islamic extremists, it’s fascinating to see similar processes at work in first-century Jewish Palestine, which was occupied territory – occupied, that is, by the Romans. In opposition, messianic nationalist movements created what Aslan aptly describes as “zealous warriors of God who would cleanse the land of all foreigners and idolaters.”

    This is the historical and political context Jesus was born into, one that takes us beyond the Christ figure created by his followers after his death to the actual man, “a revolutionary swept up, as all Jews of his era were, in religious and political turmoil.”

    Given that turmoil, it should come as no surprise that “the Jesus of history had a far more complex attitude toward violence” than is usually assumed. Gentle shepherds don’t have much place here. Aslan reads the admonitions to love your enemies and turn the other cheek as directed toward relationships between Jews, not between Jews and foreigners, and especially not between Jews and occupiers. “The message was one of repossessing the land,” he writes, “a movement of national liberation for the afflicted and oppressed.” A kingdom, that is, very much of this world, not another.

    This historical territory has been explored before, by biblical scholars such as Richard Horsley and Dominic Crossan. But in Aslan’s hands, it gains broader resonance. He brings to bear his expertise in the volatile territory of politics and religion (his earlier book “Beyond Fundamentalism” analyzed the root causes of militant religious extremism) as well as his deep background as a scholar of religion, renowned especially for the most readable history of Islam yet written, “No god but God.”

    The above excerpt from “The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth ” by Reza Aslan .

    Jesus as an early ‘republican ‘ ? Who’d have thought it .

  • Comrade Stalin

    It always amuses me when pro-choicers try to tell Catholics what their church’s position is on abortion.

    I was educated in Catholic schools until I was 18 so unfortunately I had to put up with all the pro-life propaganda they filled our heads with.

    The Church has been consistently opposed to abortion since day one.

    No it hasn’t. The church became anti-abortion a couple of centuries ago.

    As for my daughters and contraception. Which would I prefer, that they regard themselves as sex objects or that they get married and have children?

    From memory, “love God with all your heart, all your soul and all your strength, and your neighbour as yourself”. Irrespective of the choices your daughters make in life.

  • The Church can be a really useful institution for many people and that needs to be recognised. Some people very much need and thrive in the strictures of conformity. Others don’t and can take an alternative path and are doing so despite derision, judgement, and often exclusion. Much of what the Catholic Church has tied itself too is nonsense – especially the exclusion of women.

    Can’t think that religion is worth killing for so I can never figure out why so many died in its name over the years.

    Many people are genuinely seeking a way to live a better life and find that the Church does’t enable that. Many of the most ethical, social justice minded people have no relation with the church.

    Somehow the most secular societies are those with the least inequality, the least violence against women, the most recognition of the perilous state of the worlds resources, and the most empowered to act in the common interest – i.e. they have taken on the responsibility for their own contribution to the world instead of farming it out to predestination, the hope or fear of an afterlife or a confession box get-out of jail. There is no doubt religion can be a useful and progressive part of people’s lives but is no way to be running entire societies.

    Too often organised religion = power dynamics, especially at the state level and it does’t matter which religion is in the ascendency.

  • Charles_Gould

    Michael

    ” Much of what the Catholic Church has tied itself too is nonsense – especially the exclusion of women.”

    Any yet and yet we allow 92% of our schools to be run by this institution?

  • Charles_Gould

    “As for my daughters and contraception. Which would I prefer, that they regard themselves as sex objects or that they get married and have children?”

    Would you rather they used contraception or got pregnant?

  • Charles_Gould

    Taoiseach

    Where do you stand on gay adoption?