Why Gerry Adams’ problem over his non reporting of child abuse will not go away…

Matt Cooper in today’s Irish Examiner puts nail firmly to head. Ignore the whinging about hostile media coverage, that’s par for the course he says. But no matter how shaming or embarrassing this story is for all of us, this surely is the reason it won’t go away:

Liam Adams apparently told Gerry in 2000 that one aspect of the allegation was true. That was the time that the Sinn Féin leader, in the peace process era, should have reported his brother.

He didn’t. Instead when Liam subsequently moved back to Belfast why did Gerry let him live with him and help get a job in a youth club associated with Clonard monastery? And why did Gerry allow Liam to reinvolve himself with Sinn Féin in west Belfast in 2000 if that was the year that Liam made his limited confession of sexual abuse, short of rape, to Gerry?

This was also the same year Sinn Féin introduced guidelines to deal with allegations of sexual and child abuse but Adams did not inform his own party of the most serious allegations against his brother until they were made public in 2007.

To have assumed that Liam was not a potential danger to other children was another frightening misjudgment, one that Gerry was not qualified to make.

And indeed there are  interesting questions that could be asked re the knowledge Liam Adams claimed to have had about other offenders.

The abiding difficulty for Adams and his party :

“I know that I have committed no offence, and I know that I did what I considered to be the right thing, and that I co-operated fully with the PSNI, the Public Prosecution Service, with the court,” he has said. But when and why?

And why should we believe his version of events, when we know that Adams’s history is to say almost anything that is convenient to his political needs of the day? His loyal supporters in Sinn Féin, who treat him as an iconic figure and who believe he can do no wrong, are facing a test of their intelligence.

Can they forgive him anything? Do they always believe, as Adams seems to, that he is a victim of some devious, perfidious plot to destroy him, when this wound clearly is self-inflicted?[Emphasis added]

Heretofore it has just been the Irish journalist’s problem when probing Mr Adams clandestine paramilitary past. In the absence of a valid explanation as to why he broke his own parties regulations on the matter, both he and the party are compromised.

As Eamonn McCann wryly noted when this story first broke…

 

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  • son of sam

    Of course,if you read Jude Collins’ blog of 15th October,it’s those damned mainstream media types who are pursuing their relentless vendetta against poor Gerry.

  • Ní Dhuibhir

    The problem with the ‘what about the police’ line is that no-one seems to be trying to defend the actions of the RUC in 1987. (Unless I’ve missed something? Open to correction!) If the RUC still existed, and were denying, covering up or downplaying the terrible role they played in this sad case (and probably others), there would be more to write about. As it is, the story becomes one about SF because they’re still around.

  • toaster

    Good grief. You’re getting worse than Pete Baker Mick.

    Leave Gerry Adams alone. He’s done nothing wrong.

  • Drumlins Rock

    ^^^^ this guys a spoof profile right?

    It s just hard to tell where fantasy ends at times.

  • Mick,
    Eamonn McCann had a very good column in the Irish Times in which he argued quite convincingly that what the Roman Catholic Church and the Republican Movement have in common is that both view themselves as slightly above the law because both constitute the real legitimate authority. They are both forced to compromise with (non-legitimate) state authority but ignore it when they can.

  • keano10

    Slugger & Gerry Adams – Groundhog Day…

  • Mick Fealty

    Eamonn’s is a highly compassionate piece on the matter. Here’s how he tops it out:

    In both cases the actions and inactions of the respective leaders cannot be fully understood without reference to the fundamental ideas which, however risible they may seem to outsiders, have provided the spine along which their organisations have been built. It is the ideologies rather than the individuals that are most in need of cross-examination.

    “It is to be noted that while Adams’s organisation joined with others in demanding that Dr Brady resign in disgrace – “consider his position” – none of Dr Brady’s associates has publicly called on Adams to step down.

    Different organisations, of course, with different ways of going about such things. But Dr Brady might be forgiven a thin smile as he observes Adams in the course of discovering that what was sauce for the Catholic goose must be sauce for the Provo gander.

  • Son of Strongbow

    Yes let’s leave Our Patriot Dreadful alone and get back to something new and fresh.

    Perhaps Peter Robinson or the Orange Order could be commented upon for a change?

  • derrydave

    Go on Mick give us another Gerry Adams thread please – there’s just not been enough discussion of this. The point of this new thread is what exactly ? Just to keep Gerry at the top of the blog ?? You are really starting to become a parody of yourself now. Any moment now the thread predicting Gerry to get trounced in the next election in Louth will appear I’m sure……..Yaaaaawwwwnnn. You really are becoming an awful bore Mr Fealty.

  • Mick Fealty

    Read Alex Kane in the Irish News yet Dave?

  • toaster

    That’s right Drumlin’s Rock, why don’t you just go have another cry over the flag’s removal from city hall.

    Derrydave is on the money with this one.

  • nilehenri

    sorry lads, but anyone who cites mccann has serious educational issues to confront.
    while it may come as a shock to some of you, these cases don’t happen just so that we can use the opportunity to express our outrage and indignity, rather they are unscripted family disasters that have the power to (and often do) destroy lives. it would be more indicative of progress in the north if the southpark foamers would show some compassion instead of inventing fantasies that this has somehow something to do with republican politics.
    recently we saw how ann travers was cynically used and then discarded, that’s the true worth of a fenian in the eyes of the orange; it will be interesting to see which firm ms adams uses when she sues.
    and i hope all our rwb friends are copying and saving their condemnations ready to paste when a certain early 1980’s incident comes back up on the books.
    btw mick, you still haven’t told me how you feel about your dirty blood.

  • BarneyT

    If Gerry withheld information from the police at a time when they were accepted, then there’s an issue. However it would be entirely consistent to sidestep the police in 87, 2000 and 2007 for the simple reason he did not regard them as an authority. Clearly there is sn attempt to provoke a response that indicates he chose ideology over family. As I say it would be at least consistent not to engage with this crime and others. If he knew of these crimes and it appears he did he should have engineered his brothers removal rather than allow Liam to further engage in the community . From what I know he was aware of molestation. If that provoked the brandishing of a hammer then there was a shared understanding of how serious it was. He I presume will have been aware of the victims feelings and position. If it proves he offered protection to Liam with a full grasp of the gravity then it’s right to raise questions just as it would if this was a matter involving the clergy.

  • Mick Fealty

    nile,

    Two things. I heard Ann on that original phone in with Joe, and the following day on Talkback, I think. She was told right from the start she would get nowhere, not least by other victims who’d been patiently waiting in line for some sort of resolution, or even just a functional official response.

    Well, she didn’t lay down or go away and a few years later I think we can say she made her mark. Aine Adams eventually took matters into her own hands and is also making her mark. I doubt she’ll be the last.

    As for the fenian thing, if by that you mean smart catholic, even republican women, I’d say far from being discarded they are becoming a force to be reckoned with, and their common bond is often the way they’ve been treated by the ‘republican movement’.

    One of the problems with trying to mainstream the IRA’s history (like the Maze, Castlederg) is not just the number of Protestant civilians they killed but the number of Catholics they had to silence to keep the campaign going for as long as they did.

    That has to come to weigh in the balance at something. And this odd insouciance does little to ameliorate its worst effects.

    BarneyT,

    2007? After the SAA? And 2000 (if 2000 it was) in Dundalk, what exactly was the problem with the Guards? More succinctly, at what point do the special rules that protect SF from its own mistakes get lifted?

  • nilehenri

    you might be comfortable with laws based upon emotional reaction, but that’s a bit too close to creationism for me mick.
    the most galling thing about the whole freakish spad scenario was red headed jim showing that our politicians are actually quite capable, but that they have their heads turned with their own poison and bigotry, although his cynical use of the assembly will be repaid in the long run i hope; politics being a long game. my question re: ms adams; what has she actually acheived? is the remedy worse than the ailment? should one girl’s suffering mark an entire political climate for one million plus people?

    my use of fenian is a reappropriation of an appealing historical artefact, the fenian cycle. it’s curious that in all the current talk about cultures, symbolism, history, etc ad nauseum, no-one has mentioned the absence of any reference to early ulster in our historical lexicon. its like we magically appeared somehow sometime in the 15/16/1700’s, probably from scotland, yet, as we all know that that particular strand of narrative is absolute horseshit, and does not stand up to scrutiny, ergo the situation that we now have in parts of belfast.

    there were precious few silenced catholics, the great majority were silent accomplices. ‘if you are not with you you are against me’; the rules of the (english) game. catholics had a raw deal mick, when you take the argument to the victims you focus on sub-groups, it suggests a lack of empathy that taints your opinion. i sense no wish to glorify anything on ‘our’ side, my irish roots are somewhat deeper than the foundations of the long kesh. anyone (or any group) who runs around saying ‘yeah but my side suffered more than your side’ can take their self-pity up a mountian side and ride a goat with it as far as i’m concerned.

  • Charles_Gould

    The well regarded journalist, Suzanne Breen, describes today in detail how Gerry Adams position was completely unravelled and totally undermined, under the spotlight of careful court room cross examination:

    http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/debateni/blogs/the-unravelling-of-gerry-adams-29669998.html

  • mac tire

    “One of the problems with trying to mainstream the IRA’s history (like the Maze, Castlederg) is not just the number of Protestant civilians they killed but the number of Catholics they had to silence to keep the campaign going for as long as they did.”

    HAD to silence? Mick, whatever your attributes as a blogger (and you have made me stop once or twice to rethink some of my own preconceptions) that is just silly. HAD lol.

    Surely your math’s teacher would demand to see your working out on that one?

  • Charles_Gould

    He has no moral integrity whatsoever. If he had a shred of integrity he would resign.

    Compare and contrast Conal McDevitt.

  • Mick Fealty

    Well, informers? Mostly Catholic? Most of them dead or exiled. Then there’s the anti socials they had to deal with because cops became no go. That’s where we came in.

  • Blogman
  • Blogman

    …. a long time being moderated…..

  • Charles_Gould

    What about all the punishment beatings – they were Catholics being beaten as I believe that the IRA, led by Gerry Adams, did not punishment-beat or kneecap protestants, they just shot them or blew them up etc.

  • Blogman

    Still being moderated. How much moderation do three Irish Times links require? Hurry up.

  • Blogman

    Amateur night. How long did Mick Fealty and Charles Gould above wait? I was told this was a professional outfit.

  • tacapall

    The reality is this person although aware that his brother raped his own daughter, (Gerry Adams) protected Laim and arranged for him to be employed by two Sinn Fein controlled community centers as a youth worker. If people want to talk about pointing fingers at the RUC and what they didn’y do, then we could all also ask why didn’t the RUC leak any of this potentially devestating information to unionist politicians or certain loyalist paramilitaries. After all those same Special branch officers were also Orangemen and protestant bigots who allowed people to be murdered for political advantage yet they stayed silent for so long, its almost unbelievable. All the while Gerry’s sitting comfortably back in his armchair while other poor souls were being breeze blocked, six packed, beaten with baseball bats with nails imbeded for less crimes.

    The man built himself a fifedom in West Belfast and further afiled where the law applied differently to him and his family and a chosen few others who enfored his will. There is no chance he will be brought before the courts or fall on his sword over this. Your intents might be honest and worthy but I think endless blogs on the same subject get us no-where unless you have other evidence or new leads. Why dont you dig a little deeper into the Elm house allegations and what went on there, maybe you will find something that will arouse your interest.

  • Mick Fealty

    Tac,

    You misread my reason for blogging. In the first place, I blog what I think are significant elements of a significant story. If people want to add to that great. But I’m trying primarily to pick a puzzle, and for the most part it doesn’t bother me too much if some stuff gets repeated in that process.

    I’m not keen (as you know) on conspiracies. Not for Denning’s reasons for refusing the Birmingham Six but for the opposite. Conspiracies invite people to skip to the end and not take the necessary journey of discovery in between.

    We know remarkably little about the complaint to the RUC except that it was made, a note taken and filed and then withdrawn (on the advice of a social worker, Aine’s mother said).

    You can conjure with those bare facts till hell freezes over. It’s certainly hard not to believe it did fall into the hands of Special Branch, or that they did something with it.

    But it does not help get to the bottom of the matter (or as close to the bottom as is possible) to play with scenarios you cannot confirm or deny.

  • Mick Fealty

    Saturday morning bm, premium services are not instant.

  • Blogman

    The RUC reaction to the information they received in 1987 is an interesting subject but is not something we will be told. Nevertheless, we know that the plight of the victim is not something that factored high in their consideration (that is confirmed by Aine Adams and her mother). It was potentially a tool in the fight against the IRA. Because the RUC personnell may or may not have been Orange Order bigots (tac above) that condition does not in itself bequeath stupidity. Immediate leaking of the information (though, a caveat, we have no knowledge if they tried this) may have been thought counterproductive.

    Police and intelligence forces pick up damaging personal and family information all the time and attempt to use it to further their aims. They may have speculated on how best to use this information and now we are speculating on that.

    Some people think that the peace process is a conspiratorial plot that Gerry Adams, Martin McGunness and others concocted in 1981. They will see the conviction of Liam Adams and Gerry Adam’s attempt as his brother to deal with knowledge of Lam Adam’s assault on his daughter as another piece of an imaginary jigsaw. Encouraging this theory, and/or seeing it promoted and elaborated upon by sincere people in politics and journalism, is of far more use to hidden hands than leaking the story to the first journalistic source that comes along.

    As I say, being a bigot does not mean you are stupid, just highly manipulative in the pursuit of your aims.

  • tacapall

    Mick I understand quite well why your dong what your doing, maybe you misunderstand me, can you not take a hint or do ya have to poke you with a stick to make you go in the right direction.

    I dont think its head in the clouds stuff to believe Special branch kept that potentially devastating information to themselves during that era without getting some sort of quid quo pro.

  • Blogman

    Speculation tacapall.

    Releasing such information into the public domain might have been counterproductive – what would have been the Special Branch / intelligence advantage? It might rightly have been seen as callous. Far better to let it sit and fester, and come out in the natural course of events, and act as a burden weighing on the mind of Gerry Adams. In that way the original decision to ignore the plight of the victim, the initial failure to use it for intelligence/blackmail purposes, is forgotten (or driven into the far background). Instead, they obtain the current focus on Gerry Adams and any mistakes he may have made, or is portrayed to have made, in dealing with this situation in his family.

  • Charles_Gould

    Whatever way one looks at it the comments quoted

    “when we know that Adams’s history is to say almost anything that is convenient to his political needs of the day? His loyal supporters in Sinn Féin, who treat him as an iconic figure and who believe he can do no wrong, are facing a test of their intelligence.”

    seems more apposite than ever. Surely SF will now give Adams a short period to allow this news story to die, and then Mary Lou can take over. Adams now 65 is due for retirement anyway.

  • Charles_Gould

    Mary Lou would represent a real break from the past – a more forward looking leader and someone in the Dail. Ideal, A real generation shifter. A game changer.

  • aquifer

    Trouble with child abuse is that the benefit of the doubt usually given to Sinn Fein words and deeds by the Americans, Fianna Fail, socialists, Europeans and almost everybody else who has cause to detest the Brits does not apply. Gerry cannot deploy the verbal smokescreen and expect everyone to perceive a murderous English lord lurking within.

    Eamonn is on the money with the comment about the parallel authorities wielded by the catholic church and the IRA, with their pick and mix relationships to the law and justice.

  • Blogman

    “Trouble with child abuse is that the benefit of the doubt usually given to Sinn Fein words and deeds by the Americans, Fianna Fail, socialists, Europeans and almost everybody else who has cause to detest the Brits does not apply. Gerry cannot deploy the verbal smokescreen and expect everyone to perceive a murderous English lord lurking within.”

    That makes no sense. Decipher nonsense, if you can, please.

    As for Eamon McCann, as a long term supporter of the Socialist Workers Party in Britain, he should not not throw stones. He could have written an article comparing that organisation’s attitude to protecting high officials with the Roman Catholic Church’s toward offending priests.

  • Charles_Gould

    “Trouble with child abuse is that the benefit of the doubt usually given to Sinn Fein words and deeds by the Americans, Fianna Fail, socialists, Europeans and almost everybody else who has cause to detest the Brits does not apply. Gerry cannot deploy the verbal smokescreen and expect everyone to perceive a murderous English lord lurking within.”

    Indeed. There are those who always knew he was a liar, now there are more. The low moral integrity laid bare.

  • Blogman

    Congratulations on deriving a comforting thought from that.

  • tacapall

    “Releasing such information into the public domain might have been counterproductive – what would have been the Special Branch / intelligence advantage”

    Who said anything about releasing that information into the public domain. Anyone who believes Special Branch would not use the information for intelligence/blackmail purposes is either very naive or or very young and wasn’t around in those days. The majority of nationalists from republican areas who had the misfortune to to find themselves arrested by the RUC were either asked or pressurised or depending on why they were arrested, blackmailed into becoming informers.

    Just why do you think people did agree to put their lives in danger becoming informers ?

    Of course it is all speculation but wasn’t it all just speculation about Scappaticci, Donaldson, McShane etc until they were eventually exposed.

  • Blogman

    tacapall

    You have no idea whatever what purpose the information may or may not have been used for. You have not thought through how it could have been used. If releasing it would have been counter productive, as you seem to agree, what possible blackmail use could it have been – prurient political embarrassment? In relation to the abuser it might have been of potential use and no evidence has been advanced in that context. Has Liam Adams said he was approached in this context? Has he been asked?

    The information was used initially by the RUC to try and suborn the victim’s mother, but that approach, that sabotaged targeting the then alleged abuser, appears to have backfired. The issue was not resolved until 2013, not because of what Gerry Adams did, but because of what the RUC did and did not do in 1987.

    So, unless you have information, you are feeding your imagination with comfort food.

  • tacapall

    “You have no idea whatever what purpose the information may or may not have been used for”

    You still haven’t answered just why some nationalist people agreed to risk their lives becoming informers, its a question you need to ask yourself before you dismiss what I say as feeding my imagination. I could give you lots of reasons why an allegation like that could be used to blackmail someone, especially someone who obviously didn’t want to go to jail or someone who didn’t want their dirty washing aired in public.

    How do I know if Laim was approached, do you actually believe he would say if he was ? Im not privy to what was asked of Laim Adams regarding what he was asked by he RUC regarding the allegations by his daughter all I know is that the man denied them, after telling his brother that he did commit them and was then found guilty of raping his daughter. Do you think he would be the sort of person who would tell you the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth ?

  • Dixie Elliott

    Blogman seems to be implying that each lifting of the veil which conceals the murky pass of the SF leadership is all part of an ongoing plot to discredit that leadership.

    “Some people think that the peace process is a conspiratorial plot that Gerry Adams, Martin McGunness and others concocted in 1981….”

    Ah but during cross examination in April Gerry admitted he was engaged in peace process work in 1987.

    Then we have the Thatcher documents, wherein we found that..

    “Mr Atkins in a minute to Mrs Thatcher said there were “some” in the IRA leadership who wished “to consider an end of the current terrorist campaign”.The papers also disclose that the British government held this view for some time.

    There is also a memo from the then British cabinet secretary Sir Robert Armstrong to another senior official, the “gist” of which was conveyed to Mrs Thatcher, which also adverts to an IRA desire to end its campaign.

    It was written on April 13th 1981 just four days after hunger striker Bobby Sands was elected as MP for Fermanagh-South Tyrone. He died on May 5th.

    “There is reason to believe that the PIRA have been thinking seriously about an end to the campaign of violence, but feel they need a success, an avenue to pursue their aims politically, and something more on the prison regime,” Sir Robert wrote.

    “The Fermanagh by-election has given them the success, and a political opening, which there is reason to think they hope to follow up in the local government elections,” he added….”

    Now why would the British back in 1981 be passing messages like the above to each other?

    We know that those engaged in running the Hunger Strikes from the outside were the same IRA leadership to the fore in the peace process.

    Therefore how come the Brits knew this and were able to discuss it back in 1981 when men were dying on Hunger Strike?

  • Blogman

    1981 hunger strike conspiracy theories, give me a break. You believe all that guff then. Good luck with that.

  • Blogman

    “You still haven’t answered just why some nationalist people agreed to risk their lives becoming informers…”

    You are asking me yet again to speculate.

    Demoralisation primarily, depoliticisation partly, isolation probably. The problems with relentless a-political militarism as a strategy, the sheer longevity of the struggle.

    But, the effects of intelligence penetration have been vastly exaggerated by people who don’t understand politics. Because of that they will always be defeated. In fact they will bash their heads so often off a brick wall that bitterness will make them find scapegoats for their political misery. They will tear the nationalist and republican community apart seeking spies, formulating and reformulating conspiracy theories. Endless pints will be drunk seeking the key to where did it all go so wrong.

    The real spy masters will sit, snigger, and quietly laugh their heads off while you lose yours.

  • tacapall

    “Demoralisation primarily, depoliticisation partly, isolation probably. The problems with relentless a-political militarism as a strategy, the sheer longevity of the struggle”

    Thats some fancy footwork, jargon for the foolish. You seem to be suggesting every person who agreed to become an informer was involved with the IRA, is that correct, all those joyriders and innocent nobodies caught up in some fucked up game of political engineering between agent provocateurs and their handlers, everyone was involved, there were no innocents in your eyes ?

    Totally agree with your first part of your last sentence though, those same spy masters are most likely working away in the HET making sure the truth stays hidden from public view or maybe they were disposed of like every other threat –

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/chinook-disaster-did-britain-sacrifice-counterinsurgency-top-brass-to-defeat-irish-republicans/25635

  • Dixie Elliott

    Blogman said…

    “1981 hunger strike conspiracy theories, give me a break. You believe all that guff then. Good luck with that…”

    Blogman runs away from questions he can’t answer.

  • Dixie Elliott

    Lets just say Blogman that you weren’t running away or brushing over awkward questions….

    How were the Brits able to predict in 1981 that some in the leadership wished ‘to consider an end of the current terrorist campaign’ when that’s exactly what happened 13 years later?

    Adams said himself he was engaged in bringing about such an eventuality in 1987, 6 years later.

  • aquifer

    “You still haven’t answered just why some nationalist people agreed to risk their lives becoming informers…”

    The books notable informers have published say it was because they knew the conspiratorial self-referential and sectarian campaign of spying targeting murder bombing and armed blackmail was wrong.

  • Blogman

    aguifer

    If informers were concerned about “the conspiratorial self-referential and sectarian campaign of spying targeting murder bombing and armed blackmail”, why would they inform to RUC special branch and British military intelligence. After all they were doing the same thing.

    Rather more ignoble motives, combined with desperation and self justification, prabably did the trick. See my thoughts above.

    Dixiie Elliot

    ““Mr Atkins in a minute to Mrs Thatcher said there were “some” in the IRA leadership who wished “to consider an end of the current terrorist campaign”.”

    What did Mrs Thatcher make of that when the hotel in Brighton collapsed around her in 1994?
    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/margaret-thatcher-dead-war-ira-1820429

    How did Major evaluate that message as he crouched under the cabinet table in 1991 and IRA morters rained down?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TwCmQACV3qg

    One or two second thoughts?

    Perhaps you should have them too.

  • If Adams and/or McGuinness really were British agents, paid or unpaid, as some have suggested/implied, why would Atkins have to write such a minute? I already know what the conspiracy theorists will say, so they needn’t bother answering.

  • Blogman

    Tapcali 19 October 2013 at 9:11 pm

    You are clearly thinking about this. I am not avoiding you or using any fancy footwork. I am addressing the question four square. I am telling you what I think.

    The people you are thinking about are no more intelligent than you or I. They operate within political parameters. Don’t play their game, which is to give the impression of manipulative omnipotence. Republicans, nationalists, socialists, may make mistakes. They do not in general set out to betray the struggle. Decisons arrived at may, objectively, be portrayed as a betrayal, but that is not a basis for searching out personal perfidy.

    Northern Ireland is a sectarian state. It affects all politics within that state. It relies on a sectarian majority. Break that down. Apply your head to that. Ask yourself, how would you persuade a young unionist to become a republican. To do that you need to become a republican. Don’t assume that identity. Stop playing intellectual games and stop blaming Gerry Adams for your problems.

  • Dixie Elliott

    Blogman…

    Thatcher (1984) and Major almost being killed doesn’t mean they weren’t aware in 1981 that certain people in PIRA wished to bring about an end to ‘the current terrorist campaign.’

    I didn’t say as Mister_Joe tries to imply that McGuinness nor Adams were British agents. I said it’s clear from the records of the time that the Brits knew what direction these people were taking the IRA. Why would they be discussing it several times?

    Now it would be hardly likely that a unit operating in England would sent messages to Adams or McGuinness saying we’re going to blow up Maggie or later Major.

    And if they did it would look highly suspicious if the word went back to call it off.

    The fact is, you are trying to twist what I’m saying and that is the Brits knew, back then what later proved to be correct, that certain people had intentions of ending the war while allowing the Hunger Strike to continue.

    Adams admitted it himself during cross-examination that he was engaged in peace process work in 1987…before the mortar attack on Downing Street.

    And of course the Brits knew what Adams was at…why else would Brian Nelson and FRU save Adams life in 1987 when the UDA had intentions of killing him using a limpet mine?

    The author of the De Silva Report informed Adams that it would be in his report yet Adams didn’t say it was nonsense.

    Why didn’t he send his minions out to parrot the ‘it’s a conspiracy theory’ line?

  • tacapall

    Blogman once again your dancing on a pinhead using jargon to hide your inability to accept the truth. Who said anyone was more intelligent than anyone else, I asked you why people would agree to become informers and risk their lives and rather than admit that they were blackmailed or coerced, just like some IRA volunteers were, you went on a merry dance like some sort of political officer from the cold war era.

    You need to listen to your own advice about pursuading young unionists to become republican and blindly following a person who has the moral integrity of a scorpion is certainly not the best way to go, especially the armchair general type that fights to the last drop of everyone elses blood, who eats the alter rails yet is far from Christian when they walk out the church doors.

    What problems did I blame Gerry Adams for ?

  • Alias

    It’s silly to argue that attacks in the UK prove that their weren’t ‘agents of influence’ on PIRA’s so-called ‘army council’ since the that presupposes (a) they would have been aware of a particular attack and (b) would have been in a position to prevent the attack.

    Freddie Scappaticci, the agent appointed to the head of PIRA’s Internal Security Unit and to its Northern Command by Gerry Adams, explained how it works:

    “Cook Report team: He wouldn’t be responsible for English operations, but he would be part of the team that sanctioned them?

    Scappaticci: What happens is, I’ll explain the situation to you, right? The IRA Army Council says: This is what our strategy should be for the next year. We’ll have to do this, blah, blah. We think the operations should be in England or the Continent or whatever. That then filters down to the people who control it, who I told you is [A] [Tommy Murphy] and a guy called [B] [Tommy Keenan], right, who’s living in Carlingford at the minute. He moved out of Belfast.”

    It should be noted, however, that PIRA confined their murder campaign to Northern Ireland, with 98.7% of murders committed there. This was a ‘result’ for the intelligence services since no one cared as PIRA were just blowing up Northern Ireland. So-called “spectaculars” were designed to disguise how few attacks actually occurred on ‘the mainland’ and how successfully the intelligence services had contained the trouble.

    In regard to Thomas ‘Slab’ Murphy, who controlled PIRA operations in the UK, it is highly unlikely he was an agent but he was nonetheless bought off by the security services turning a blind eye to his criminal racketeering in return for him agreeing to be “a good republican.” There’s more than one way to control people.