Morgan to captain England for historic Dublin game

Cricketing maestro Sachin Tendulkar narrowly missed, again, his century of centuries [lbw for 91] in the fourth, and final, test match against England as India failed to avoid a fourth defeat in the series. 

And, on Thursday 25 August, the One Day version of the new top ranked Test side will play Ireland in Dublin for the very first time

Former Ireland batsman, Dublin-born Eoin Morgan has been named as captain.  For England.

England National Selector Geoff Miller said: “The squad we’re looking to take to Ireland involves a number of exciting young England players as we rest several players currently involved in the npower Test series against India.

“By resting several players that have played international cricket since the start of the summer the opportunity has arisen for a number of talented up and coming players to continue their development on the international stage.

“We know from previous encounters that Ireland are a tough ODI outfit and we’ll be fielding a very strong England side that will need to play well.

“We’re also presented with the opportunity to provide Eoin Morgan with further leadership experience and I know he is very much looking forward to assuming the captaincy and developing his leadership credentials while in charge of a young England squad.”

Ireland captain, William Porterfield, makes an important point about the professionalism of his side

Ireland captain William Porterfield echoed the views of his coach: “This is the game everyone in Irish cricket has been talking about, and really looking forward to. It’s been a sell-out for five months, and there’s sure to be an incredible atmosphere at the ground. We’ve long shaken off the enthusiastic amateur tag – there’s now eight of us plying our trade in county cricket, and turning in consistent performances.

“All but two of our squad earn our living from cricket, making us virtually a full-time outfit, and our cricket has improved year on year, as our results show. This is a vastly experienced squad, with nine of the guys having played 100 times or more for us – even George (Dockrell), who just turned 19 last month has made 46 appearances, while Paul Stirling at 21 has played 81 times.

“We’re all aware we’ve lost the element of surprise, and also that there’s now a real expectation from the cricketing public on us to perform. We’re confident that we have the players in this squad to do just that, although we do realize that it won’t be easy against an England team showing such great form against India at the minute.”

Here’s the full list of the Ireland team, with their county sides.

William Porterfield (captain) (Warwickshire)
Alex Cusack (Clontarf)
George Dockrell (Somerset)
Trent Johnston (Railway Union)
Nigel Jones (Civil Service North)
Ed Joyce (Sussex)
John Mooney (North County)
Kevin O’Brien (Gloucestershire)
Niall O’Brien (Northants)
Boyd Rankin (Warwickshire)
Paul Stirling (Middlesex)
Albert Van der Merwe (YMCA)
Andrew White (Instonians)
Gary Wilson (Surrey)

We all know what happened the last time the two ODI teams met…

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  • jonno99

    Cricket used to be a very popular past time in Ireland in the 19th century….??

  • Firstly, lets acknowledge England’s superb performance at thrashing India in the 5 day game.

    India did, of course, win the 50-over World Cup a few months ago. Let it be said, again, that the 5-day game and the 1-day game are very different and England, currently ranked 5th in the 1-day game, have a long way to go to climb that mountain. The contrast in the two games is epitomised by the form of Eoin Morgan.

    Morgan, as a bastman, was, unfortunately, the weakest link in the Test series against India. His average for the series was 32.33, behind 8 of his teammates. Had he not been dropped early on in his century innings at Edgbaston, his series would have been a failure. In the player world rankings, he is ranked No. 55 and behind 7 English players. In one day international cricket, Morgan is ranked No. 25. Only one English bastman is ranked above him in that form of the game..

    England are resting some of their ODI players in front of their forthcoming ODI series against India. That said, England are still smarting from their defeat to Ireland during the World cup and will badly want to win this match.
    They, Captain Morgan included, will treat Ireland with respect

    Expect a close game on Thursday.

  • Mark

    Seymour ,

    There was a time when the weakest batsman in an England eleven had a single figure average for a test series . It’s a nice luxury to have your worst batsman with an average in the thirties .

    England were outstanding in this series and fully deserve the tag of world beaters . You could have argued for four or five players to receive the man of the series award . Personally my vote would have gone to Cook whose batting at the start of the series set the perfect platform for England’s series win .

    India could point injuries to Khan and Sehwag .Although Sehwag did make an appearance during the latter stages , it was obvious he was rusty and unfit . Too much emphasis was put on Sachin’s 100 hundreds and if it haven’t been for Dravid , the hammering could of been worse .

    Andy Flower deserves all the plaudits he’s bound to recieve . He took no shit from any of the players and this approach seems to have paid off bigtime as some England fans will remember their team been bowled out for 50 odd in the Caribbean just before he took over .

    Anyway Seymour enjoy the feeling while it lasts ( 3/4 years ) because the Barmy Army has been put through the ringer down the years and deserve their fifteen minutes ……

  • Mainland Ulsterman

    The England test side have been awesome – that sounds very weird to say after 30 odd years of watching modest triumphs followed by slumps as surely as night follows day. Long may it last, they are due a year or two of success. I’ve just been on holiday with some Aussies and they are despairing as to how long it might be before Australia can really challenge again (but my sympathy is limited). But in ODIs, as Seymour Major says, it’s been a while since England really seemed like a consistently top side and Ireland have every chance.

    As for Mr Morgan, he will have mixed emotions I’m sure, but professional sportspeople just want to play at the highest level they qualify for. People play for the teams put in front of them (e.g. one of my old school mates from Belfast who bit his lip and played cricket for Ireland Under 23s when selected, despite considering all-Ireland teams bizarre in our era). ‘England’ in cricket has always been a misnomer. BBC cricket coverage in my youth was presented by former England captain Tony Lewis, of Wales. Really it’s the British Isles team. Doesn’t really reflect modern nation state borders but then nor do the Ireland rugby, hockey or indeed cricket teams. We are still in the Edwardian era there.

  • Mark,

    I certainly will join the feeling. It will last until the Winter, at least, when England play Pakistan in the Gulf states.

    One writer said a few days ago something like “now I know what it feels like to be an Australian”
    but the Aussies did dominate the one-day game as well as the 5-day game. English supporters will now want to see the one-day side improve dramatically.

    Mainland Ulsterman, you have made an interesting observation about players from Celtic countries playing for England. There have been 27 since the first test Match in 1877.

    Ed Joyce (Ireland) has been on the England fringes and might yet still make the test side in the future. Other than Morgan, four other Irishmen have played for England. Morgan was the first since 1905.

    8 Scotsmen have played for England. The most prominent of these was Mike Denness, who captained England. The last Scotsman to play for England was Gavin Hamilton who made his only appearance in the tour of South Africa 1999.

    The number of Welshmen who have played for England is 14. The last Welshman who played for England Simon Jones in the 2005 Ashes team. It was a shame that injury brought his international career to a premature end.

  • Honest John

    Surely Martin McCague was the last Irish born player to play for England?

  • Honest John,

    It depends on the criteria. Martin McCague is generally regarded as an Australian since that is where he was brought up and therefore domiciled at the time he entered first class cricket.

  • Dec

    ‘Really it’s the British Isles team.’

    Not quite, the team officially represents England and Wales. Scottish and Irish players must have been living in either England and Wales for four years in order to qulaify via residency.

  • PaulT

    Ed Joyce (Ireland) has been on the England fringes and might yet still make the test side in the future.

    er ……Ed Joyce is firmly back in the Irish side, and had a decent World Cup (for Ireland)

    Not quite, the team officially represents England and Wales. Scottish and Irish players must have been living in either England and Wales for four years in order to qulaify via residency.

    er.. No, they could live on the moon, its as long as they’ve played in England for four years and are not from one of the Test playing countries, the point is that players from Associate countries should have a right to play at the highest level.

    Sadly there are another 2-3 Irish players on the radar for England,

  • Mainland Ulsterman

    Dec,
    Thanks for that point of information – even weirder! Still, it’s the test team you’re going to play for if you’re from Scotland, NI or indeed the RoI and you’re test standard – so it’s a British Isles team in that sense. If you’re playing county cricket, the residency thing is a mere formality. You’re not liable to be picked until you have a few years under your belt anyway.

  • PaulT

    Hardly Mainland Ulsterman, here’s an old list.

    In all, 61 overseas-born players from 15 countries – including unlikely places like Peru, Hong Kong, Italy, Germany, Denmark, Kenya, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Papua New Guinea – have played Test cricket for England.

    Here is a list of cricketers born outside UK and Ireland who have represented England at Test level. (Those born in Scotland, Wales and Ireland are not included in this list, for example Wales-born reverse-swing quickie Simon Jones).

    Sixteen were born in India, 11 in West Indies, 10 in South Africa and nine in Australia.

    AUSTRALIA: Billy Murdoch, John Ferris, Sammy Woods, Albert Trott, ‘Gubby’ Allen, Adam Hollioake, Ben Hollioake, Jason Gallian, Tim Ambrose.

    SOUTH AFRICA: Basil D’Oliviera, Tony Greig, Ian Greig, Allan Lamb, Chris Smith, Robin Smith, Andrew Strauss, Kevin Pietersen, Matt Prior, Ian Trott.

    WEST INDIES: Lord Harris, Pelham Warner, Roland Butcher, Norman Cowans, Wilf Slack, Gladstone Small, Phillip DeFreitas, Devon Malcolm, Chris Lewis, Neil Williams, Joseph Benjamin.

    NEW ZEALAND: Andy Caddick.

    INDIA: K.S. Ranjitsinhji (‘Ranji’), Edward Wynyard, Richard Young, Neville Tufnell, Douglas Jardine, K.S. Duleepsinhji (‘Duleep’), Nawab of Pataudi, Sr., Errol Holmes, Norman Mitchell-Innes, George Emmett, Colin Cowdrey, John Jameson, Bob Woolmer, Robin Jackman, Nasser Hussain, Minal Patel.

    PAKISTAN: Usman Afzaal, Owais Shah.

    ZIMBABWE (formerly Rhodesia): Graeme Hick, Paul Parker.

    KENYA: Derek Pringle.

    ZAMBIA: Phil Edmonds, Neil Radford.

    GERMANY: Donald Carr, Paul Terry.

    ITALY: Ted Dexter.

    PERU: Freddie Brown.

    HONG KONG: Dermot Reeve.

    PAPUA NEW GUINEA: Geraint Jones.

    DENMARK: Amjad Khan.

    Murdoch, Ferris, Woods and Albert Trott had earlier played for Australia. Nawab of Pataudi Sr. Later played for India .

    Incredibly, seven overseas-born cricketers from five countries represented England in the first Test against New Zealand at Christchurch in January 1992. They were Hick (born in Zimbabwe), Lamb and Robin Smith (South Africa), Pringle (Kenya), Lewis and DeFreitas (West Indies) and debutant Reeve (Hong Kong). Only four were “home grown” Englishmen — skipper Graham Gooch, Alec Stewart, R.C. (Jack) Russell and Phil Tufnell.

    Regardless you could only call it a British Isles team in the same manner you would say that Jackie Charlton managed a British Isles team while in Ireland.

    Similarily a large part of the British army is composed of individuals from 2nd or 3rd world countries, should it be renamed the 3rd World Army?

  • Dec

    ‘er.. No, they could live on the moon, its as long as they’ve played in England for four years and are not from one of the Test playing countries, the point is that players from Associate countries should have a right to play at the highest level.’

    PaulT

    The ECB regulations governing qualification specifically state that for those players of British or Irish citizenship wjho were not born in England or Wales, they may play for England if they have been ‘resident in England or Wales for the immediately preceding four consecutive years’.

    http://tinyurl.com/4xsvwr9

  • Dec

    Mainland Ulsterman

    ‘If you’re playing county cricket, the residency thing is a mere formality’

    True but if you had a scenario where a Welshman and a Scotsman were playing in the Sheffield Shield competition in Australia, only the former could play for England.

  • PaulT

    Dec, your looking at cricket thro the eyes of a football fan. The ECB runs County Cricket as well as the national side. To play County level you need to be a Qualified Player, ie you qualify to play for England. You’ll note the min number of days is roughly the lenght of the Cricket season.

    We’re both right, yes, you may think you are ‘righter’ than me, however, this is cricket, I suppose it is possible for for someone to live in England and play cricket abroad and after four years be able to play for England, but I’ve never heard of it.

    Which brings me to your other point

    “True but if you had a scenario where a Welshman and a Scotsman were playing in the Sheffield Shield competition in Australia, only the former could play for England.”

    The likely answer is that neither could play for England as they wouldn’t be playing for a County side.

  • PaulT

    aaarrgh again your=you’re, and anyother typos

  • Dec

    ‘Dec, your looking at cricket thro the eyes of a football fan. ‘

    No, I’m quoting ECB regulations (link supplied). If you feel the ECB have got it wrong, take it up with them by all means.

  • Mainland Ulsterman

    Paul T,
    Thanks for that list, great stuff. I think England should be scouring Papua New Guinea for talent, given they came up with Geraint Jones. I wonder if he’s ever worn one those cock gourd things?

    But the fact that people around the world of British parentage can also play for the team doesn’t make much difference to my overall characterisation of it as a British Isles team – as you point out, Jack Charlton’s team was still “Ireland” despite having many from the diaspora in it. At any one time there are about 10 million British citizens living outside the UK and being enterprising folk we end up in places like Papua New Guinea and Kenya.

    But in test cricket it is a British Isles team in the sense it can and does draw on players from Ireland and Scotland, as well as England and Wales, albeit it makes them jump through bizarre English residency hoops. This is besides overseas born players of British parentage.

  • PaulT

    Mainland Ulsterman, I actually think the rules for qualifying for England through plying your trade there/here is a good one, many will disagree but I think soccer would be better if the national sides were drawn from the players in the top division regardless of nationality.

    Becks and Keane turning out for the USA!

    and I’m not googling ‘cock gourd’ I don’t want to know

  • Mainland Ulsterman

    PaulT,
    On the latter, it was in a programme on the Discovery Channel I never want to see again. But I may not Google it myself.

  • PaulT

    couldn’t help myself and googled it, strange customs