Voyager: “It’s bubbly out there.”

The Guardian’s GrrlScientist picked up on the 30-something Voyager probes’ latest scientific discovery on humanity’s farthest journey

New view of the heliosheath. Red and blue spirals are the gracefully curving magnetic field lines of orthodox models. New data from Voyager add a magnetic froth to the mix. Image: NASA

Here’s the YouTube version of the ScienceatNasa video posted at the Guardian.

And if that explanation was a little too pink and fluffy for you, try this different version of the same story from the NasaExplorer channel.

And here’s a comparison between the old view of the heliosphere and the new view.

Old and new views of the heliosheath. Red and blue spirals are the gracefully curving magnetic field lines of orthodox models. New data from Voyager add a magnetic froth (inset) to the mix. Credit: NASA

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  • …As the solar wind travels outwards it pushes against the stellar medium…

    I don’t quite understand what that medium is. I’m still not clear whether or not the ether exists. It is generally accepted that the Michelson/Morley experiment demonstrated that it doesn’t. But there are other explanations for the surprising outcome of their experiment.

  • Pete Baker

    Joe

    You’ve misquoted from the NasaExplorer Heliophysics video.

    It’s “galactic” medium. That would be the material comprising the galaxy. The material, however diffuse, that our sun, Sol, is hurtling through. Hence the termination shock.

    The Michelson/Morley experiment was looking for something else entirely.