Of Water….

Firstly, unless you get valleys drowned by evil Saxon neighbours I don’t think you have that serious an issue……

But they do in Australia. A nice piece in the Indie describes the ecological disaster that Australia is becoming. A nice quote:
“Garry Hera-Singh lives at Meningie, on the banks of Lake Albert, and has fished commercially all his life, like his father and grandfather before him. But the area where he catches yellow eye mullet, flounder, black bream and mulloway has shrunk by two-thirds.
The remaining waters are up to five to seven times saltier than the sea. “Nothing grows or lives in it; it’s just a preservative,” he says. “The whole eco-system is on life support. Salinity is gradually engulfing it, like a cancer.”
In his youth, Mr Hera-Singh would see “huge flocks of birds that blacked out the sky”. Not any more. When plenty of fresh water was flushing through, the region was alive with fish and aquatic weeds and insects.
“All I’ve seen lately is a massive loss of life. Watching the place die a slow death, as I have for the last 40 years – it makes you weep””
Mr Diamond knew what was coming. In a
bit mor detail here.
And back to the election….remember that daft German octopus? Well the Aussies have a Croc of course…Dirty Harry…. Wonderful.
Still very close for Saturday’s election – The Australian reports a swing against Labor
We’ll report the results here – remind me are they 12 hours in front or behind?

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  • Jimmy McGurk

    50 years and 12 hours! 🙂

  • Jimmy McGurk

    In front that is!

  • William Markfelt

    The German jellyfish was an octopus. Given its prediction of the 2008 Euro Final, it would have made a good pizza topping.

  • greenflag

    Thanks for the Jared Diamond link. He also writes about the Australian situation in some detail in his book ‘Collapse’ a few years ago which you may have already read ?

  • Dewi

    Yep Green Flag – great bloke.

  • Dewi

    sorry

  • Why the continued obsession with all things antipodean, Dewi?

    Anyway, I thought today South Wales, Gower and Swansea in particular, had a fair share of water problems: too much, not too little. And not for the first time in recent memory.