A national theatre should be about more than celebrating past ‘glories’…

Two cheers for David Norris’s excellent suggestion that the Abbey Theatre should be relocated to the historic building of Dublin’s GPO

First of all it is owned by the State and due shortly to be vacated as a postal facility. There is therefore no acquisition cost. Moreover, it has historical associations with theatre. For many years it was the headquarters of Radio Éireann and all major radio drama was broadcast from there.

Second, the existing Abbey site could either be sold or used as collateral to raise funds for the building work. This should help to make the entire transaction exchequer-neutral. In any case in the event of a budgetary shortfall I have no doubt whatever that for so significant a national cultural project, EU support would be available.

Failing that, I am certain that the mystical combination of Yeats’s Abbey and Pearse’s GPO would lead to a positive queue of Irish American sponsors.

It happens that David has had some homework done on the site, by architectural students from DIT:

…it emerged from their researches that the site is more than adequate and indeed exemplary from the angle of spatial dimension and flies, backstage areas, scene docks, deliveries, as well as double auditoria and rehearsal space.

Moreover, as a result of the shelling from the gunboat Helga in 1916, the only remaining original element of the building is the magnificent portico and entrance facing O’Connell Street. The rest is effectively an empty shell awaiting imaginative redevelopment.

And as well as being central to the city’s self identity, it is extraordinarily well served by public transport:

…the location is very much in tune with the egalitarian aspirations of the revolution. It is the one building whose location is instantly and universally known to every citizen throughout the State.

It is easily accessible by every means of transport – train, tram, taxi, Luas, bus, proposed metro, car, bicycle, rickshaw and even shank’s mare. It will be both of the people and for the people.

His final closing argument:

Have we not yet had a surfeit of mediocrity? What a transfiguring impact the arrival of the Abbey would have on O’Connell Street and on the whole sorely neglected north side of the city! Dublin would at last become what it claims to be – a proud European capital.

How well it would gel with the idea of a new cultural hub, including the city council’s splendid plan for the redevelopment of Parnell Square, the flourishing Gate Theatre, the relocation of the central city library to the Ambassador cinema and of course the heroic James Joyce Centre in North Great George’s Street.

All great stuff from a Senator who has become a great Irish institution in himself… So why just the two cheers? Well, I buy everything about the argument, even “the relationship between the Rising and the literary renaissance, between Pearse and Yeats”. Yet, since that’s all about where the Republic has come from, I feel compelled to ask: where is it going?

Now I know you cannot expect a national theatre to chart the way forward: genuine innovation more often arises from the more marginal ends of the cultural melee. They are institutions after all, and they are necessarily restricted. But there’s a chance here, not simply to reach for an iconic, out in the open, heart of the city venue but beyond the kind of cultural stagnation that the performing arts has fallen into in the last two to three decades… And I’m thinking more than just Ireland…

The second from last item on the Today programme this morning (I’d embed it, or link to it separately but the Beeb don’t run to that just yet)… It’s a consideration of what happened to the avante guarde of the 20th and in particular the maurading genius of Sergey Diaghilev whose influence has been seen to give way to safety…

Somewhere in that debate the phrase ‘the revenge of the 19th Century’ was used to describe the wall to wall Swan Lake phenomenon in ballet… That for me is largely because the theatres housing those productions are magificent artifacts of that era, and they give best results reproducing the work of that time…

Any national theatre for Ireland should retain one eye at least on the future and the changing nature of society…If there is one form that reflects the new interconnected, peer to peer, networked, always on manner in which knowledge is transfered, then at least some of the new space should be given over to a theatre-in-the-round… And given to the charge of an artistic director with the instincts to properly exploit it…

Otherwise I suspect it will become just one more great opportunity ushered in with grand effect but in which the Irish fail to grasp the shapeshifting character of a future that is arriving even more quickly than it ever has before… The new Abbey could and should help give rise to a renaissance of its own, not just celebrate those literary and artistic triumphs of a not so dim past…

, ,

  • Itwas SammyMcNally whatdoneit

    Great idea and O’Connell Street could do with with it – rarely go there except on the way to somewhere else when in the city.

    …and talking of historic, insurgency buildings, I think it is Boland’s mill – it has been empty and sort of falling-down-boarded-up for years. Dont know why, as it could have been used for apartments keeping at least part of facade – that is very unlikley for some time.

    …and on a related issue – what have we built since we booted the Engleze-running-dogs-of-imperialism out of that part of the country that is of note – even the DART runs on British laid tracks.

  • Guest

    The Spire and Jim Larkin statue.Millennium bridge.
    The first few to my mind,arguably of note.

  • Itwas SammyMcNally whatdoneit

    Guest,

    that list sort of proves my point.

  • Full illustrated Norris article here [pdf file]

  • what have we built

    Between independence and the Celtic Tiger? Not much. But the last 20 years or so are making up for it, certainly in the area of infrastructure. The new Boyne bridge for example. Architecture hasn’t caught up though – central Dublin in particular is tired and uninspiring.

  • Guest

    Ok Sammy,
    what is your point?
    I actually quite like the Spire.

  • Guest

    Funnily enough I find Dublin inspiring for it’s lack of modern crap found strewn across most capitals.There is a need for making a place one’s own and marking out Eras,but I think this needs to be curtailed in a money-mad world.Anyhow,with all that partition has brought about there has been a certain holding of the trenches with regard to era moving,a kind of hang the other on the hook logic.The change in that positioning was largely due to the Celtic Tiger as Andrew has suggested.
    I’ll let you draw your own conclusions as to where the ending of the Celtic tiger is going to lead us…..

  • Itwas SammyMcNally whatdoneit

    Guest,

    what do you mean what is my point?

    what the feck have be built since we threw the Englezes out? the spire aint bad, nor is the tart with the cart? but they are a failry bad return. It is not as if we dont do building and have a shortage of people?

    Andrew,

    I was talking about in Dublin and I appreciate that when we got the money we did play catch up on infrastructure – but nothing with any real vision. We nearly had the BertyBowl but we are now stuck with a stadium that is too small – which of course was fine in its day when you-know-who were running the country and even Croker went up under the heel of Engleze imperialism – although being built with bits of the GPO – just ot take us full circle and back on topic – which of course the Engleze feckers shelled.

  • DR

    Hadnt been to Dublin for about 7 or 8 yrs I guess years so went down during the Tiger boom expecting it to be a massive building site at worst or all scrbbed modern and glitzy, seemed to quite a bit of new residential development on the North side, but the city centre had changed little and was starting look a little tired, the early 90s developments had lost their sheen, I guess any spruce up is on the long long finger now.
    More on topic, if you merge two national icons will one not overwhelm the other? will people say “meet me in front of the Abbey theatre” instead of the GPO, or vice versa go to sea a paly in the GPO.

  • Dave

    “Yet, since that’s all about where the Republic has come from, I feel compelled to ask: where is it going?”

    Norris already answered that: “Dublin would at last become what it claims to be – a proud European capital.”

    Not a proud Irish capital. Given the obvious symbolism, the GPO should become an ‘information centre’ for the EU. After all, Norris sees EU money (notwithstanding that Ireland is in fact the second largest contributor to the EU after Germany despite being one of its smallest members) paying for it, along with Irish-American sponsors. It’s true, I guess, that the Irish won’t be paying for anything ‘grand’ for the next few decades since they have to repay their modest 1.67 trillion euro overdraft that they ran up in just ten years of eurosystem membership. As the last ten years of the mythical ‘Celtic Tiger’ (which was actually the period prior to transferring sovereignty to the EU, 1993 to 2001) was ‘built’ on spending borrowed money, then the next 50 or so years will be dedicated to paying it all back. So, with the fitting symbolism of the birthplace of Irish sovereignty being turned into an information centre for those to whom the Irish have now surrendered their sovereignty, the Spire outside the GPO may serve as a heroin needle to remind the Irish that their sovereignty was purchased with cheap credit to which they duly became addicted, much like Dublin’s early herion dealers sold their drug cheaply to hook their customers.

  • Dave,

    If he’d said “a proud world capital” would you be saying the same thing about the black helicopters?

  • It will be built in Ballsbridge so Seanie Dunne can be bailed out of his latest attempt to storm the well guarded parapets of Dublin 4, or the monument to madness that is the Glass Bottle site.

    Building it on iconic State property would never do.

    For more reading, see Karl Whelan’s latest: “Hard to Deny Now that NAMA is a Developer Rescue Plan”

  • Dave

    No, Andrew, because there is no ‘world’ government to whom the Irish have transferred the sovereignty that was asserted at the GPO. That agency which now controls Irish sovereignty and dult determines Ireland’s internal affairs, correctly referred to by Norris, is the EU. Do you now underatnd why you are a bit confused about the world government?

  • Dave,

    I’m not confused in the slightest. Not every mention of the word “Europe” automatically means the EU.

  • Reader

    It was Sammy: what have we built since we booted the Engleze-running-dogs-of-imperialism out…
    Well – half of the UK motorway network, for a start.

  • Itwas SammyMcNally whatdoneit

    Reader,

    I thought my comments would go down well with the Unionist Irish.

  • Reader

    It was Sammy: I thought my comments would go down well with the Unionist Irish.
    It was just a throwaway remark – the temptation overcame my caution. However, may I just say that when I was in Dublin I was really impressed with the inspiration behind the Spire? Far more impressive than the street furniture we have in Belfast.

  • Itwas SammyMcNally whatdoneit

    Reader,

    ” the temptation overcame my caution ” I’m glad to hear that you Prods are far to fecking reserved.

  • Norris: “Culture provided the imaginative spark that formed the catalyst for the armed revolution. It was after all an insurrection of poets.”

    Are there any ‘revolting’ poets out there lurking in the undergrowth awaiting 2016? Just futuring …

  • Rory Carr

    Converting the Dublin GPO to facilitate a national centre for drama seems like quite a good idea to me and of course we already have a precedent in that Leinster House has long been renowned as the national centre for farce.

  • Itwas SammyMcNally whatdoneit

    Nevin,

    re.” ‘revolting’ poets ”

    is that a reference to the Draculean Pearce?

  • “the new interconnected, peer to peer, networked, always on manner in which knowledge is transfered”

    I’m not sure about the knowledge content of what passes for modern communication.

    It’ll be a twitter running round the audience now rather than a titter 🙂

  • I’d think that Pearse would have been one of the poets Norris had in mind, Sammy. Our more recent poets wouldn’t have been the sort to reach up into the thatch for a pike. Heaney was a man of the spade.

  • Itwas SammyMcNally whatdoneit

    Sometimes the spade spakes louder than the pike.

  • KieranJ

    The Spire should be removed and a statue of Eamon de Valera erected in its place. It is a shame on the Irish people that a monument to the founder of modern Ireland and its greatest leader cannot be found in Dublin.

  • Greenflag

    ‘Yet, since that’s all about where the Republic has come from, I feel compelled to ask: where is it going? ‘

    I would’nt worry . It’ll get to wherever it’s going 😉

    A marvellous suggestion by Senator Norris ;).
    With Charles Stewart Parnell our ‘protestant ‘ adulterer and Home Rule Champion at one end and Daniel O’Connell the libidinous Catholic Liberator at the other ,and with the emblematic phallicity of a ‘rising; nation i.e the Stiffy near the Liffey between the pair of them , and now with the Abbey in the GPO , Dubliners will be surrounded by a multiplicity of pricks – political, historical and theatrical . Meanwhile the ghost of Horatio Nelson will hover over the new theatre still wondering like thousands of older Dubliners where did they put his pedestal and where the f***k is this place called An Lar ?

    A pity that pair of theatrical reprobates and transplanted Englishmen -Michael Mac Liammoir and Hilton Edwards are no longer around to hear Senator Norris’s National Theatrical Restoration Proposal.

    Old Dublin theatrical joke

    Question:

    ‘Anyone know where Micheal Mac Liammoir is ‘?

    Answer : (from unidentified source off stage )

    ‘He’s up to his Hilton Edwards’

    Well done Senator Norris . Jimmy Joyce, Oscar Wilde , Sammy Beckett and Sean O’Casey and the rest of them would be proud of yiz 😉

  • Reader

    KieranJ: It is a shame on the Irish people that a monument to the founder of modern Ireland and its greatest leader cannot be found in Dublin.
    Surely modern Ireland didn’t even begin to take off until Dev was dead?

  • Dave

    “I’m not confused in the slightest. Not every mention of the word “Europe” automatically means the EU.” – Andrew Gallagher

    So, you think that Norris meant that Dubliners proclaim their city to be “European” in the same way that Muscovites might do, e.g. that Moscow is on the continent of Europe along with Dublin, and the capital cities of 50 or so other European states?

    “Dublin would at last become what it claims to be – a proud European capital.” – David Norris

    That’s theoretically possible, of course, but it isn’t what they actually proclaim it to be. They refer to the flag of the ‘state’ that sits on their vehicle licence plate in place of the flag of the state wherein they actually reside. And that is what Norris is referring to: Dublin being a ‘capital’ of another state.

    A capital city, kid, refers to the city of a state wherein a government resides. It can only be internal If it is external to the state, then the state is not sovereign. The capital city of Ireland or the capital city of England makes sense, but the only sense that “a European capital” makes is with the EU wherein the formerly sovereign states become subordinate to supranational federal state.

    That is also, why, incidentally, that Dubliners do not refer to themselves as Earthlings. You see, a continent does not have a nationality attached to it. It is only one of the seven continents masquerades as a nationality and a state, and that is only because circa half of the governments of that particular and peculiar continent have declared their states to be a subordinate region of the EU (and emergent state).

  • Dave

    “It can only be internal[b].[/b] If it is external to the state, then the state is not sovereign.”

    (That litle full stop makes a big difference)

  • Itwas SammyMcNally whatdoneit

    Dave,

    if, and when, we as the soverign country we are, decide that membership of the EU is no longer in our country’s interest we can tell them to feck off – you and others will have to do a much better job than you are curently doing to convince people we are anywhere near that point at the momement as the result of Lisbon referendum clearly indicates.

    In the meantime, the streets of Dublin, full of other EU nationals, is a vibrant sign of the both health of the city and the value of membership.

  • Dave

    Sammy, you might think you have that option but the reality is that integration will make it impossible to exercise it – as it is designed to do. You will only ever get out of it if you are prepared to suffer a few decades of the hardship that would be involved. Folks might have done that before the EU eradicated the concept of nations acting in their national interest but now it is every man for himself. Your freedom is gone, kid, and it’s never coming back. And the clever thing is, folks don’t even know that anything was stolen from them – yet.

    Reader, many theories are put forward to explain Ireland’s economic growth, but the death of De Valera isn’t one of them. In 1987 (28 years after De Valera had left government office in 1959), Ireland’s per capita GDP was circa 60% that of the UK. 10 years later, it was higher than the UK (25,000 in Ireland compared to 22,000 in the UK). The key factor was the dumping of Keynesian policies, the fiscal mismanagement of Fitzgerald, et al, and the adoption of free market policies of Friedman. There was many political factors (such as investment in education), but it was the economic policies of Haughey and McSharry that turned Ireland’s fortunes around (low taxes, expedient currency devaluation, and small government, etc, works every time). That was all destroyed when we surrendered sovereignty over monetary and macroeconomic policies to the EU, along with a range of other freedoms that are essential to good government. None of those freedoms would have ever been possible without the sovereignty that De Valera acquired for Ireland to determine its own affairs in its national interest. Now that they have given their sovereignty away, it’s back to depending on the ‘kindness’ of foreign regimes to govern the Irish. A quick glance into history might have told theme that wasn’t a smart option, but they do say that history is doomed to repeat itself.

  • Dave,

    And that is what Norris is referring to: Dublin being a ‘capital’ of another state.

    Given a statement that can be interpreted two ways, I usually pick the one that doesn’t require the words to be reordered first.

    If it is external to the state, then the state is not sovereign.

    Theoretically, there’s no reason why the capital of a state has to be in the same country. The Oireachtas could meet in the Irish Embassy in New Zealand and it wouldn’t make Ireland any less sovereign. I wouldn’t recommend it though.

  • Pigeon Toes

    “Theoretically, there’s no reason why the capital of a state has to be in the same country. The Oireachtas could meet in the Irish Embassy in New Zealand and it wouldn’t make Ireland any less sovereign. I wouldn’t recommend it though.”

    Yeah just think of the expenses that might incur.

  • KieranJ

    The term “modern” obviously has a different meaning on either side of the Atlantic.

    As an Irish American, I do not equate modern with monetary gain.

    When I referred to Dev as the founder of modern Ireland, it was in contrast to seven centuries of foreign rule and occupation.

  • Thereyouarenow

    Andrew Gallagher said

    “Theoretically, there’s no reason why the capital of a state has to be in the same country. The Oireachtas could meet in the Irish Embassy in New Zealand and it wouldn’t make Ireland any less sovereign. I wouldn’t recommend it though”

    If we got them all out of the country in one group we would not allow them back.

    Thats why they would never give us the opportunity.

    God save New Zealand if we could pull it off.

    It would be similiar to that time Castro emptied his jails when the USA allowed some Cuban immigration.

  • Itwas SammyMcNally whatdoneit

    KieranJ,

    the boy Dev has fallen down the pecking order of Irish heroes partly due to recent ideological trends, which may of course change again, but I agree he does surely deserve some structural recognition.

    …and talking of statues perhaps we should have a series of statues to those executed in 1916 directly outside the new theatre in O’Connell street.

  • “the new interconnected, peer to peer, networked, always on manner in which knowledge is transfered”

    You might think that this would lead to a more democratic society. In some ways it does. It’s now much more difficult for government to control the flow of information that it doesn’t want the public to hear. On the other hand, networks of the masonic style are not designed to act for the common good; the newish Common Purpose would appear to me to be such a network.

  • susan

    Mick Fealty, I was so enjoying your piece, and subsequently the Norris piece you directed us to at the Times site, when this sideline under Latest News drew my gaze:

    “Woman Hurt in Belfast Bomb Blast.”

    http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2009/1016/breaking23.htm

    So much today for enjoying genuinely engaged cultural debate and warm memories of Friel and O’Casey at the Abbey. Couldn’t help thinking of a quote from American novelist William Faulkner. “The past isn’t dead. It isn’t even past.”

  • DR

    with or without ropes sammy?

  • Guest

    Sammy,

    I mean are you saying that the lack of buildings or statues of note somehow demean the city?Are the best cities those with most statues?biggest statues?
    I honestly do not see your point, and cannot without you stating why it is important that there has not been much built.Are the cities of London and new york really fulfilling their function in a way that Dublin is not.
    Now,here comes the rant.;;;

    I would guess that you believe that revolution should have been followed by the tearing down of all that was “British”.I am no west Brit but that kind of anti-Irish/British past is just as likely to foster division on this island.It is the face of republicanism that unionists see as a threat to their future.There is a point to be made to unionists concerning their place in an untied Ireland in the fact that the Republic did not deface their Victorian houses,that they did not rip up “British” size/made tracks to replace them with “Irish” tracks.Your knifing the Republic in the back by suggesting that this is a failure.Revolution and change is never about the past.That’s called revenge.

  • Greenflag

    Dave ,

    More theatrical nonsense from our resident europhobe .

    ‘The key factor was the dumping of Keynesian policies, ‘

    Keynesian policies were not dumped – they were moderated . The State became able to reduce the public sector percentage of GDP over a period of a decade .

    ‘the fiscal mismanagement of Fitzgerald,

    Fiscal mismanagement had been the order of the day since Sean Lemass left office . A combination of public sector ‘greed’ and failure to address the problems caused by the oil crises of the 1970’s left the State on the IMF waiting list by 1987.

    ‘and the adoption of free market policies of Friedman.’

    Ireland first ventured into free market policies following the Anglo Irish Free Trade Agreement in the 1960’s just about the time when Milton Friedman had discovered Ayn Rand and her bat shit crazy philosophy 🙁

    ‘It was the economic policies of Haughey and McSharry that turned Ireland’s fortunes around (low taxes, expedient currency devaluation, and small government, etc, works every time). ‘

    Contrary to your neo conservative ideological read that Haughey and McSharry were avid followers of the Friedman school the harsh truth is that they were left with no choice given the state of the public finances – just as now the Government has had very little real choice . Even Maggie Thatcher at her ‘privatisation’ and ‘low tax ‘ mode zenith had to tell Mr Friedman that his ideas would not be ‘appropriate ‘ for the UK being that the UK was not a Chile or Argentina well not yet anyway and it’s people were not enamoured by the thought of rule by a miltary junta.

    Wherever you get your ‘sovereignty’ notions from they are hardly applicable in a world where even the USA’s economic sovereignty is dependent on Chinese fiscal policies not to mention the investment decision makers of those institutions around the world who are looking at their dollar holdings and are now transferring them into Euros or Yen -anywhere but the ‘sovereign ‘ dollar and the even less ‘sovereign ‘ pound sterling .

    ‘(low taxes, expedient currency devaluation, and small government, etc, works every time).’

    Works some of the time would be a more truthful comment .

    Low taxes made Ronald Reagan popular . They also helped to build the USA’s budget deficit and brought about the Savings & Loans’ debacle of the 1980’s which cost the US taxpayer 300 billion in ‘bail out ‘ funding .

    ‘Expedient currency devaluation’

    What a joke and what was ever expedient about our neigbour’s Britain’s use of this financial instrument going back to the 1970’s ?. For all their devaluations against first the dollar and mark and later the euro – Britain did not willingly go down the devaluation route -they were forced into devaluation by economic interests OUTSIDE the UK . So much for your naive out of date concept of ‘national ‘ sovereignty’
    And to cap it all in the 1990’s Britain’s Chancellor Norman Lamont was forced into a political resignation by a group of individual investors headed by George Soros who were not even British citizens /subjects .

    ‘small government .

    More cobblers . We have listened to the neo cons on this subject for the past several decades and other than the privatisation of some public services the sum total of this canard is to leave public spending and the numbers of people employed by the public sector even higher than before the neo con rightists took power in the USA in 1980.

    US debt both private and public is now four times what it was in the 1960’s when it’s population was 60% of what it is now . Health expenditure consumed 5% of American GDP in the 1960’s as opposed to almost 20% now . The banking , insurance and financial services sector of the US economy pocketed 40% of all profits made by corporate america in 2007 as compared to 12% in the mid 1960’s.

    There are 7 billion people in the world . They will not all be provided with employment by the ‘private sector ‘ How many of them can be is at least debateable .

    BTW -I’m all in favour of lower taxes , smaller government and free markets . I’m also in favour of apple pie and ice cream in a world where people like Bernie Madoff and Stanford and Hitler and Stalin would not be born .

    But alas they are . And any nation which believes in ideology (any ideology) for it’s own sake rather than for it’s effect on people as individual human beings is barking up a tree which will in time be cut down by the people that ideology ‘ignored ‘.

  • the most arrogant part of the piece is the implication that when we are about to embark on 80bn of useless debt, relocating the Abbey will makes Dublin “a proud capital”.

    Notwithstanding the classic overestimation of the arts community of their standing, given the size of the fall Dublin is undergoing it seems to me that a lot of pride “wenteth before”.

  • Itwas SammyMcNally whatdoneit

    DR,

    re. Ropes – are you talking about the means of execution – the 15 quarefelahs were shot – but yes, let have some of the gorey detail – getting shot may be heroic -but it cant really be that much pleasant.

    Guest,

    You are misunderstanding me – I think the city of Dublin and its architecture are brilliant – the British did an excellent job – but the feckers have been gone for some time and I think it shows a failure of vision not to be able to point to something outstanding, distinctive and Irish in archictectural terms that has been constructed since we ran them out.

  • Guest

    Fair point Sammy.
    Indeed,it is still the “Royal” Institute of the Architects of Ireland (RIAI)”.
    As I said,personally,I enjoy Dublin’s low key architecture.

  • Rory Carr

    I must say, Greenflag, you’re really on form today and giving old Dave a run for his money but don’t please take this as a cue to push forward your repartition handcart or else you’ll lose these Brownie points.

  • Itwas SammyMcNally whatdoneit

    re. repartition handcart

    scorcher.

  • Reader

    kieranJ: As an Irish American, I do not equate modern with monetary gain.
    I agree with you that ‘modern’ isn’t a synonym for ‘wealthy’. But neither is it a synonym for ‘independent’.

  • Greenflag

    rory carr,

    ‘but don’t please take this as a cue to push forward your repartition handcart ‘

    spoilsport 🙁

    ‘and giving old Dave a run for his money ‘

    It seems Dave has been running the ‘sovereignty’ marathon a lot longer than I’ve run the ‘repartition stakes for the handicapped ‘
    😉

    ‘ you’ll lose these Brownie points.’

    Brownie points are like frequent flyer miles .Whenever you want to use them you can’t as either the dates are excluded or the seats are taken or you have to book 9 months in advance . Another racket by Airlines to keep the sardines coming back to the one airline .

    GF does’nt do brownie points . He prefers cash or gold bars 😉

  • Greenflag

    IWSMWDI

    ‘but I agree he does surely deserve some structural recognition.’

    He does but probably not in Kildare . In a licensed premises in an unnamed town close to the Currragh during the middle of an election campaign an anti Dev supporter quickly gulped down a beer following a mighty bout of canvassing for the Blueshirts and was heard to remark loudly ‘

    ‘That Dev is an ugly horse faced bollix and a spanish bastard ‘

    He was somewhat taken aback when he realised that he was now surrounded by a crowd of locals who moved threateningly towards him .

    ‘You watch your mouth or your mother wont recognise you ever again ‘ said one large chap .

    ‘Lads , lads said the anti Dev man . Surely this is not FF territory -I mean yiz are not FF men are ye ‘

    ‘ No it’s not but it’s good horse breeding country and we don’t like people insulting our horses ‘