Next 100 days crucial: Cowen

An Taoiseach, Brian Cowen said the next 100 days are crucial during an interview on the Late Late Show last night. Youtube video in two parts.

  • Gréagoir O Frainclín

    Cowan was rightly put on the spot and nearly reduced to tears with the questions Turbridy asked. Did he accept the blame for the downturn in the Irish economy? Turbridy persistantly asked. “I didn’t do anything wrong” in a whinging voice Cowan said. He kinda looked pitiful really. But really common sense would have said to put something by for a rainy day when we had a continuous surplus of billions and billions for years.

    BTW, Turbridy is a great replacement for the wooden Pat. What an entertaining Late Late Show last night. Joan Collins looks great for her age and Niall Quinn’s missus is a cracker. Saoirse Ronan looks set for big things too in Hollywood with her new Peter Jackson/ Steven Speilberg backed movie The Lovely Bones. Plus a 60 odd thousand euro prize capped off Turbridy’s first show.

    Gréagóir O Frainclín

  • Comrade Stalin

    I am no fan of the Cowen or the corrupt political party that he leads, but I thought he put in a reasonably good performance, and answered the questions patiently despite being constantly interrupted.

  • oisineire

    I agree with Comrade that he did put up a good performance considering the odds against him, and of course the backdrop of the latest opinion polls (15 and 17% – OUCH!)
    At the start of the show he was doing very badly, but he seemed to turn it around. But I think his honesty was the key thing in trying to win people round.
    Time will tell.

  • Nordie Northsider

    ‘Cowan was rightly put on the spot and nearly reduced to tears with the questions Turbridy asked…’
    Are you kidding? ‘What you do, you do well’ and so on. He let him off with the old lie ‘No one saw this coming’ when in fact any number of economists were warning about the property bubble and public spending.
    Pat Kenny was very bad at the touchy-feely, fluffy, chatty, celebrity, human interest stuff but rose to more serious matters. Tubridy goes the opposite direction.

  • Comrade Stalin

    I got the impression that Tubridy wanted to give people what they wanted, ie something like a show trial. Various things were put to Cowen and then he was interrupted when he tried to answer.

    I wonder how Bertie would have put up with it. I can imagine he would have given more back talk to the interviewer, whereas Cowen quietly put up with the interruptions. Probably very sensible in my view.

  • Like Comrade Stalin Im not particularly a fan but I’m sure his advisors etc were very happy with his performance. Cowens people would have received a ‘feel’ for the style of questioning in advance of the real deal.

    All round a good performance in my opinion.

  • John O’Connell

    A good performance and a human face to put to the so-called corruption. I think that people were overstating the case against FF politicians but Cowen set them straight and won over the studio audience in the end.

  • Itwas SammyMcNally whatdoneit

    Bit like a captain of a listing ship being interviewed as he is about to issue the order to take to the lifeboats – but excellent interview – perhaps let Biffo off too lightly on the ‘no one saw it coming’ line. Clearly no one in the 2 main right wing parties saw it coming – only the supposed madmen who didnt understand economics on the left were warning of disaster.

  • Comrade Stalin

    I would point out that the Irish people certainly didn’t see it coming when they gave Fianna Fail and their record in government their resounding approval in the 2007 elections. This endorsement was given despite over a decade of relevations and enquiries into the corrupt conduct of Fianna Fail politicians in government, corruption which contributed significantly to the banking failures that we are now well aware of. Fianna Fail merely gave the people what they wanted.

    And to think Conall’s party wanted to merge with these people.

  • DerTer

    Once again I want to complain about something close to diffusion (defusion even) of effort. An earlier thread, begun by Pete, referred to a less than incisive interview by Ryan Tubridy on the Late Late Show with Cherie Blair. Then we had Conall’s new thread about Tubridy’s interview earlier in the very same programme with Brian Cowen (who was actually the first guest), something that could so easily have been posted into Pete’s thread.
    What is being missed by there being two separate threads is the huge contrast between Tubridy’s treatment of Cowen and his apparently more gentle handling of Blair.
    Now I can get on with what I wanted to say. I was surprised at some of the comments on Pete’s thread [‘Unanswered, and unasked, questions’], in particular about people expecting too much from the LLS, which is essentially an entertainment show. It is true that the LLS has sometimes been a bit soft in the middle – especially during Pat Kenny’s tenure, when I began to look elsewhere for my Friday night excitement. But the programme inherited and often upheld Gay Byrne’s record of innovation, intrusion and stirring it up as well.
    I didn’t hold on long enough to see the interview with Cherie Blair, but it does sound as if it was a missed opportunity. However, as earlier posts have indicated, Tubridy took a very different line with Cowen, who was his first guest. Tubridy seriously took him apart, and not just about politics; he also got the audience very much on his (Tubridy’s) side – to the point where, for the first time in years, I started to feel sorry for a leader of FF. Tubridy wanted admissions of guilt for Cowen’s past sins as Minister for Finance, and apologies to the Irish people for his and the government’s failures – as well as asking him if he drank too much!
    Am I wrong in thinking that it was/is important to consider the different approaches to these two interviewees, and the reasons why that might be?

  • Comrade Stalin

    DerTer,

    I think Tubridy judged that the people in the audience and at home wanted to see blood on the carpet, and that this may have backfired.

    It would be far fetched to say that there was some kind of conspiracy to make people feel sorry for him, although that’s the way I felt after the interview. Given Ireland’s drinking culture it’s ridiculous to try to take issue with someone who likes to go for a pint, indeed Bertie virtually made a virtue of going for a pint in Drumcondra every Friday.

  • Greagoir O Frainclin

    “Am I wrong in thinking that it was/is important to consider the different approaches to these two interviewees, and the reasons why that might be?”

    Cowan is the present Taoiseach of the country in difficult economic times. Cherie Blair is the wife of the former British PM.

  • AS

    Quite a contrast with the Donaldson interview on UTV last week or for that matter the treatment meted out to the Robinsons earlier in the summer, some of our local interviewers should take a few notes on how to properly grill a politican, one things for sure, our politicans won’t be queing up to get the treatment meted out to Mr Cowan

  • Mack

    ’twas Sammy..

    Clearly no one in the 2 main right wing parties saw it coming – only the supposed madmen who didnt understand economics on the left were warning of disaster.

    Dream on Mo Cara – apart from the two of the most vocal – like George Lee (FG), David McWilliams (we should back George Lee) – (never mind Brian Lenhian’s special economic advisor Alan Ahearne). Globally, Peter Schiff is hardl left wing – But perhaps you only read / listen to leftists? Might explain your confusion..

    Though Cowen did reasonably well, though

  • Mack

    Thought Cowen did reasonably well, though