“the real issue is about P6..”

Anyone thinking they had spotted a possible thawing of positions in the polit-bureau over academic selection may have to think again. On Stormont Live, after the initial opening gambits [also below the fold], the DUP’s Mervyn Storey and Sinn Féin’s John O’Dowd resumed their customary positions on opposite sides of the barricade [and the Minister? – Ed] Playtime’s over.
Those opening gambits.

, , , , ,

  • USA

    Holy Crap Batman,
    A reasonably unbiased opening gambit from Peter Faker.
    Is the world still turning on its axis?

  • ulsterfan

    Education has the potential to bring down the Assembly and is a more difficult problem than support of policing or decommissioning.

  • Ulsters my homeland

    just wondering if there is anyone who thinks that academic selection isn’t necessary at all, even 16(GCSE), 18(A-level)?

  • Big Maggie

    UMH

    I for one don’t think it’s necessary. I went to secondary school in the south in the sixties where it was unknown. I changed schools midway because we moved. You could do that without problems in those days. Many of my schoolmates went on to great things, many less than great. It didn’t seem to hurt us that there was no 11-plus or equivalent.

  • Ulsters my homeland

    Big Maggie…..what about potential employers and those organisations, universities who have to decide which person to recruit.

    Let’s say these employers/universities have conducted an interview and background check, what else is available for them to make their decision if no academic selection is available? Should they offer internships to all who applied?

  • willis

    UMH

    Good point.

    One problem in industry and business is graduates who believe that because they have passed all the exams, there is a good job waiting for them.

    It is even more difficult for them when they see others with lesser qualifications getting jobs which they think are their entitlement.

  • Ulsters my homeland

    Willis, I think the problem you mentioned with graduates is largely down to a lack of work experience in universities. Work experience should be made mandatory for all university students.

  • willis

    UMH

    I don’t disagree. I guess the point you were getting across in a subtle way, is that we will all meet some form of academic selection along the way.

    Certainly I needed a few A levels to get into my degree course, and a degree helped me get a job.

    Some would say that tuition fees and student loans have indeed made work experience mandatory for all but the richest students.

  • Edward

    The problem is that education is stressed as the be all and end all of human existence and the fact that if you don’t graduate university you are some how a second class human.

    Personally I always had the intellect but never the grades for school. I could have easily passed the eleven plus and taken a spot in a grammar school but it would have been wasted on me.

    But here in my part of Canada we have streaming at 14 and its up to the student and parents to decide what level they wish to pursue. Its probably the equivalent of some kind of Dickson plan or comprehensive. In my town there of 40,000 people there are only 3 high schools each just slightly different then the others and you choose your high school based on these factors but in the essence they all offer the exact same curriculum

    It worked for me I got to choose differing levels in in differing subjects to suit my needs. more stringent math and science levels less history and geography.

    To me Academic selection is bogus because it doesn’t recognize differences in desire and ability just differences in IQ.

  • Ulsters my homeland

    “[i]Personally I always had the intellect but never the grades for school. I could have easily passed the eleven plus and taken a spot in a grammar school but it would have been wasted on me.”[/i]

    you’ve had the intellect, not not the grades?….who decides in the intellect?

  • Edward

    We have tests we just don’t have the automatic academic selection

    At about 14 you are given a series of aptitude tests and then you meet with a guidance councilor who suggests pathways you may want to investigate as careers, My guidance councilor suggested lawyer or doctor or accountant, I investigated accountancy because I always had an affinity for numbers.

    But then I started working summers for my dad running heavy equipment and discovered that I both enjoyed the life style and the work and have been doing it ever since.

    The point being is that no one made an arbitrary decision for me it was up to me to choose a path and follow it.

    I sometimes now wish I had gone to university not because of the life I have but because after 24 years its getting a little tedious and there is no where left to go up.

  • Pete Baker

    Guys

    Whilst I realise that, for some, this debate by now may seem sterile, but the actual topic is the political machinations involved here.

    Not anyone else’s personal circumstances.

    If we could focus..

  • Big Maggie

    UMH

    what about potential employers and those organisations, universities who have to decide which person to recruit.

    That went like this. The bright pupils went to class A; the others to B or C. You sat your Leaving Certificate exam. If you got honours you could sit the matriculation that vetted you for Uni, which I did. Others simply walked into jobs because things weren’t as specialised in those distant days. It wasn’t a bad system I believe and it produced some very good people.

  • edward

    Pete

    What political machinations?

    If SF say yes then DUP says no and vice versa?

    Sf want and end to academic selection

    Dup want to continue with academic selection

    The end result has already been stated and we are just waiting till both parties feel they have enough ass coverage to agree to selection at 14

    The debate is effectively over now its just a few months of “MY DADDIES BIGGER THAN YOURS” political discourse and eventual settlement.

    The whole of Storomont would go along swift as a bunny if they could just agree halfway between their positions

    But i guess thats just the normal outworkings of a house divided unto itself

  • Pete Baker

    “The end result has already been stated and we are just waiting till both parties feel they have enough ass coverage to agree to selection at 14”

    Except, edward, that is specifically contradicted in the video clip.

    If you’ve watched it.

  • edward

    I did watch it now try reading

    The debate is effectively over now its just a few months of “MY DADDIES BIGGER THAN YOURS” political discourse and eventual settlement

  • Pete Baker

    edward

    “The debate is effectively over now its just a few months of “MY DADDIES BIGGER THAN YOURS” political discourse and eventual settlement”

    Pointless. Given the mutual veto on any proposals from the Education Minister.

    The debate isn’t over until a compromise is reached.

    Hence the machinations.

  • William

    And where is the Ruanator, one wonders????

    She should be relocated back to running the West Belfast Provofest or checking out the location of the 3 Irish Eco tourists who vanished from Colombia, not helping to ruin the education in Northern Ireland, whilst living in County Louth herself.

    Why in God’s earth a Provo supporter living outside the jurisdiction is allowed to be a Minister here is beyong me !!

  • edward

    Pete

    AGAIN try reading

    Sf want and end to academic selection

    Dup want to continue with academic selection

    The end result has already been stated and we are just waiting till both parties feel they have enough ass coverage to agree to selection at 14

    The debate is effectively over now its just a few months of “MY DADDIES BIGGER THAN YOURS” political discourse and eventual settlement.

    the rest is all bullshit optics

    William

    what about what about what about, winge

  • USA

    [Play the ball – edited moderator]

  • Alan

    Just went to a School meeting on GCSE choices.

    There is a lot more choice for young people than even a few years ago. They are at an age when they can begin to understand how their decisions will impact on their futures. You can also see them preparing themselves to take on the challenge.

    There really is no good reason to start making life changing decisions before GCSE. The 11+ is not linked in any way to future career or life choice options in the same way as GCSE. Let’s compromise and make the key choice at 14, not 11.

    It is, furthermore, a blind alley to suggest that anyone wishing to see the end of selection at 11 is against exams. We’re not, and never have been.

  • willis

    On the subject of what was actually said, Mervyn Storey mentioned Cookstown and Kilkeel in the context of the Dickson Plan.

    Is anyone familiar with how things operate there?

    If anything, it is the DUP who are able to think out loud, even if that means Jim Allister on their back. Only crumbling electoral support for Sinn Fein will sort this out

  • Glencoppagagh

    Willis
    Cookstown has non-selective state and Catholic schools though I suspect the latter loses a higher proportion of able pupils to grammars elsewhere.
    However, Cookstown HS produces impressive results at the higher levels of achievement in both GCSE and A levels (ie 10 A*, 4As, Oxbridge). It regularly outperforms the ‘prestigious’ Dungannon Royal a few miles down the road which tends to have a fairly mediocre intake.
    Ironically, some would argue that it concentrates on the more able at the expense of the rest but
    it demonstrates that grammar schools are not essential to academic excellence in rural areas at least.

  • Essentialist

    Isn’t it interesting to see the froth spew from the keyboards of those who think because Sinn Fein say something is so it becomes reality?

    On the issue of the Stormont Live segment what was interesting was Storey’s refusal to answer Devenport on the “leaked paper” on selection at 14. The quotes used by the BBC man make it clear that the DUP were thinking about taking the cover Bishop Donal McKeown had offered through the churches.
    They then realised that they had been fed bad advice (from the “educationalists”)and rapidly attempted to cover up Allister’s damaging expose. Notice how none of the DUP big boys have a word to say on education at the moment. They are getting into electoral mode and are calculating the risks on a daily basis.
    Now it seems they are back to the St Andrews position of academic selection at 11. However the damage has been done.

    Of much more import is the whole ESA picture. The revised curriculum is the problem child and until it is dealt with decisively (gutted) distraction talk about transfer arrangements are just an excuse to avoid the big picture. P6 is indeed a problem as Storey claimed but so are P1 – P7. The entire primary school experience will deteriorate so long as the revised curriculum exists. A Pupil Profile is worthless to parents and transfer to post-primary will become chaotic involving a legal minefield.

    On the issue of qualifications and their worth the Policy Exchange group have published a warning paper.
    http://www.policyexchange.org.uk/Publications.aspx

    The hard truth about ‘soft’ subjects is the title.

    It has direct relevance to Northern Ireland but strangely the local politicians have nothing to say about the ESA becoming in effect a North-South rather than East-West education body. Follow the money…

    “Pupils may be unknowingly ruining their chances of getting into a top university by choosing so-called ‘soft’ subjects, including Law, Media Studies and Psychology. This research note shines a much-needed spotlight on an admissions process that is complicated and often misleading. We show that the vast majority of research-intensive universities are admitting fewer ‘soft’ A-levels and more traditional A-levels in comparison with the national uptake of these subjects in schools.”

    Where is Ruane’s promised test from CCEA? The unregulated system is the product of the “educationalists” as is the consequent impasse. Compromise is impossible – pleurality must continue to exist. For the “educationalist” alter egos on this blog its time you came up with a legal solution that represents parental wishes. Your time for this is rapidly running out.

  • delta omega

    Glencoppagagh has given a reasonable summary of the Cookstown HS position but I think it is worth noting that even within that system there is still streaming, based on maths and english results coming from the primary schools, and in fact it is academic selection by another route. Each P6 and P7 pupil is assessed on english and maths and the results determine which stream you enter. P7 pupils also have the option of sitting the 11+ if they want to attend Rainey Endowed Grammar in Magherafelt, or the Royal School in Dungannon, however given the success that Cookstown HS has, most choose not to sit the test. Cookstown HS sees itself as a combined grammar and secondary school.

  • Essentialist

    That’s Cookstown comprehensive Delta Omega.

    Glencoppagagh’s claim:
    “Cookstown HS produces impressive results at the higher levels of achievement in both GCSE and A levels (ie 10 A*, 4As, Oxbridge)” is typical of grammar school performance but is outlandish when stood beside….

    “it demonstrates that grammar schools are not essential to academic excellence in rural areas at least” but he conveniently ignores the Principal, Mrs Sloan, who accepts…. ” while it is right and proper to praise the very top students, Cookstown High School is a combined Grammar and Secondary School and are always consistently well above the National Average. For what – grammars or secondaries? Duh!! Average of 99 and 1 is 50. Pretending to be a grammar is a delusion practiced by many secondary heads. Comprehensive schools are more likely to underperform.

    The principal of the Dungannon Royal School stated in a recent speech “Education wrongly used can, like oil, lead to the horrors of commercial risk-taking, misapplication, unrealistic expectation, over-exploitation and wastage, only in schools this takes the form of numerous poorly thought through initiatives, a raft of increasingly bizarre innovations and throwing money at half-baked schemes which come not from the professionals but from politicians, academic theorists and decision makers in remote corridors of power who have little practical or professional background and even less qualification for devising or implementing such changes. I repeat again what I have tried to emphasise many times in recent years: children’s lives are far too precious to take risks with “bright ideas” which at best have little support from the professionals and at worst have been hatched by those in government as a response to misconceived problems, dressed up in vacuous educational jargon, and founded on spurious, so-called “progressive” educational ideology. This is and has been destroying the educational system in Great Britain and the USA. If we let it prevail in Northern Ireland it will do the same for us in not very many years. We will reap a whirlwind of educational catastrophe for decades to come.”

    Sounds like a warning from a teaching professional. I wonder does he back ESA and their curricular nightmare?

  • Glencoppagagh

    Essentialist
    What are you arguing about? The fact is that Cookstown HS admits all abilities including those of grammar standard whatever that is nowadays.
    The Dungannon Royal head is a trenchant critic of reforms but he has already been publicly embarrassed by the fact that his school admits nearly everyone who applies, regardless of grade. It’s almost as comprehensive as Cookstown.
    He is fighting for his school’s survival in its present form so his views should be understood in that context.
    On a more political note, I recall a few years ago the head of Holy Trinity in Cookstoon publicly criticising Catholic parents who sent their children to grammar schools. He made envious comparisons with Cookstown HS.
    Food for thought for SDLP and SF in the area. Catholic parents obviously like selection.

  • Essentialist

    Glencoppagagh

    Cookstown is a pseudo-comprehensive. What sort of intake will it have absent selection and a wash-out from the merger?

    More importantly according to Professor Robin Alexander, Director of the Review of Primary Education in England, in a letter to the Prime Minister in 2005

    The belief that educating children aged 5-11 is a sideshow, and that teaching them is in every sense child’s play, has at last begun to yield to a simple, demonstrable and indeed momentous truth: that humans learn more and faster during their pre-adolescent years than at any other stage of their lives, and that what and how they are taught during those years profoundly conditions their future prospects and hence their contribution to the society in which they grow up. Primary education is a matter of the utmost importance.

    I think Pete wanted sluggerites to focus on this tpoic but glad to see your recognition that “Catholic parents obviously like selection”

    Take a close look at the results of the Early Years Enriched Curriculum Project from CCEA,discover where the project came from and ask yourself why “educationalists” in Northern Ireland ignored the scientific evidence and choose to impose an inferior system of teaching phonics to primary school children. Perhaps then you will appreciate the extent of the mess we’re in.

  • Glencoppagagh

    Essentialist
    “What sort of intake will it have absent selection and a wash-out from the merger?”
    Sorry, I haven’t the faintest idea what you’re talking about.
    “Catholic parents obviously like selection”
    But non-Catholic parents around Cookstown a bit less enthusiastic it would seem.
    I probably share your suspicion of educational innovations but I thought use of phonics in any form was a bit suspect except perhaps for children with real difficulties.

  • Glencoppagagh

    Essentialist
    Let’s just get to the point. If bright children are not disadvantaged at an all-ability school in Cookstown, why would they be in Magherafelt, Dungannon, Omagh or Enniskillen.
    It might be a different matter in Belfast, I accept.

  • Essentialist

    Glencoppagagh,

    You post “Sorry, I haven’t the faintest idea what you’re talking about”

    Slowly now…grammar plus secondary = comprehensive. You cite A-level and GCSE results as if they were found in a lucky bag yesterday. No one was stopping parents from sending children to a school of their choice – then the “educationalists” stepped in. Anecdotes about Cambridge graduates from St. Louises’s etc etc are just that. Removal of choice is the main story.

    As the DENI have explained on numerous occasions about performance tables; “The information contained in these tables does not provide a valid basis for comparing performance between schools, since it takes no account of the intakes of the schools or of any other factors that may affect pupil performance.

    I suggest you should have admitted “Sorry, I haven’t the faintest idea what I’m talking about.”

    Best exhibited by this gem:
    “I probably share your suspicion of educational innovations but I thought use of phonics in any form was a bit suspect except perhaps for children with real difficulties”

    No need for further comment.

  • Glencoppagagh

    Essentialist
    So your essential problem is that people will not have the choice of sending their children to academically mediocre grammar schools. They have the right to demand that choice even where it is clear that their choice will not necessarily lead to the best academic outcome.
    However, we simply cannot continue mantaining at public expense grammar schools which are not genuinely selective merely to satisfy social aspirations. For such people there is always the option of getting the cheque book out.
    As for phonics, you may be qualified to dismiss my opinions but the truth is however little I know, I care even less.

  • Jim Henson – Muppett Master

    Is this the mantra of the Northern Ireland educationalist?

    “however little I know, I care even less.”

  • willis

    PACE

    “Glencoppagagh’s claim:
    “Cookstown HS produces impressive results at the higher levels of achievement in both GCSE and A levels (ie 10 A*, 4As, Oxbridge)” is typical of grammar school performance but is outlandish when stood beside….

    “it demonstrates that grammar schools are not essential to academic excellence in rural areas at least” but he conveniently ignores the Principal, Mrs Sloan, who accepts…. “ while it is right and proper to praise the very top students, Cookstown High School is a combined Grammar and Secondary School and are always consistently well above the National Average. For what – grammars or secondaries? Duh!! Average of 99 and 1 is 50. Pretending to be a grammar is a delusion practiced by many secondary heads. Comprehensive schools are more likely to underperform.”

    Now look here, some of us expect a certain level of structure with our polemic.

    Quote by all means, but without links your quotes lack context and lack the potential for further analysis.

    Glencoppagagh & Delta Omega

    Thanks for your input.

    Can I ask, given that you know the situation in the Cookstown-Dungannon-Magherafelt area well:

    How did the Cookstown High situation develop? Was it an experiment by the WELB? or a local initiative? Clearly it works well.

    I’m an engineer, so I care little for theory which cannot be replicated in the real world.

    Yes Jim – I’m not an educationalist – just like Gavin Boyd.

    However I train technicians/engineers/technologists, and I have seen the spawn of our finest Grammar schools fail to come up to the output of “lesser” schools. All this in the world of Maths, Physics and other hard subjects which may well get less attention under the “Revised Curriculum”

  • willis

    PACE

    “Cookstown is a pseudo-comprehensive. What sort of intake will it have absent selection and a wash-out from the merger?”

    I understand your concerns vis-a-vis the revised curriculum, but do you really need to post in Ulster-Scots?

  • willis

    “Is this the mantra of the Northern Ireland educationalist?

    “however little I know, I care even less.” ”

    To be fair it served Stormont well for 50 years.

  • Jim Henson – Muppett Master

    Willis,
    Essentialist has left you isolated apart from your e-friends with whom you wish to propagandise on this thread. Have you discovered e-mail? Schools issue an annual prospectus. Have you discovered the Royal Mail? Analysis? Where?

  • willis

    Jim

    Funny, you are starting to sound like him. Surely not another alias?

  • Glencoppagagh

    Willis
    Cookstown HS is in the SELB area. I don’t know how or when it happened but it resulted from a merger of grammar and secondary. It may have been out of necessity but since the school still has around 1,000 pupils that might not have been the case.
    Jim
    I’m not an ‘educationalist’ whatever that is. I definitely don’t know much about phonics.
    I am not even anti-selection but the nonsense propagated by some in the grammar school lobby needs to be challenged. I simply believe that some grammar schools shouldn’t survive because they can’t attract a sufficiently academic intake and the Cookstown example suggests that their demise would not cause any deterioration in standards.

    Where has Essentialist gone? Has he just mutated?

    I see the Dublin newspapers this morning pointing out how the fee-paying schools in Dublin and Cork dominate university entrance. Is SF’s policy to promote an all-Ireland approach so that the middle classes in NI are also forced into fee-paying and then keep the proles out of university.

  • Essentialist

    Conspiracy theorist Willis? All those pro selection, pro grammar posts come from one mutating poster? Perhaps you should seek out the source for the crackpot progressivist nonsense peddled by the DENI and the advice it was given. Matching the advice to outcomes will give you all the information you claim to seek. Citing anecdotes for different attainments in various geographic areas of the province is extremely inefficient.

    Now Glencoppagagh. If you are truly interested in “the nonsense propagated by some in the grammar school lobby” you need to challenge them on their support for the revised curriculum. This is the Trojan horse through which “SF’s policy to promote an all-Ireland approach” is to be delivered. No grammar school principal or teacher has spoken out against this curriculum which is incompatible with grammar schools. Strange isn’t it?

    The problem you may encounter seeking clarity is that the AQE is without a clear voice. When was the last time Sir Kenneth Percy Bloomfield delivered a clear straightforward message? Where is his promised test? What about his emphatic support for the Pupil Profile?

    Read more in his latest book (list here in BT article)
    http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/opinion/columnists/sir-kenneth-bloomfield-how-i-spend-my-new-lease-of-life-helping-others-13971998.html

    The grammar school defender eschews the 11-plus and rank order entrance to grammar schools. His link with the GBA is even more interesting since he has acted as spokesman for them on significant occasions.
    The GBA is dominated by the Catholic Voluntary Grammars and their influence relies upon parents believing that they are the only voice on the matter of grammar schools. That view has been rejected after outcomes based analysis by parents.

    BTW what is a “genuinely selective” test for admission to grammar school? The 11-plus is the only instrument I am aware of – do you and your engineering friends have another?

  • willis

    PACE

    Ah! I see you are not denying it then!

  • Jim Henson – Muppett Master

    Glencoppagagh,

    Agreed on “nonsense propagated by some in the grammar school lobby” but your friend Willis may be leading you up the proverbial.

    Willis

    “Yes Jim – I’m not an educationalist – just like Gavin Boyd. However I train technicians/engineers/technologists, and I have seen the spawn of our finest Grammar schools fail to come up to the output of “lesser” schools”

    Boyd is a commercial educationalist. What is your interest?

    Spawn, finest and lesser are not words used in engineering circles – unless you mean social engineering.

  • Essentialist

    Willis

    Perhaps you can explain how to prove a negative?

  • willis

    “I simply believe that some grammar schools shouldn’t survive because they can’t attract a sufficiently academic intake and the Cookstown example suggests that their demise would not cause any deterioration in standards.”

    Now happening in Strabane.

    Here is a handy resource:

    Irish News Education articles without subscription.

    http://www.gtcni.org.uk/index.cfm/area/news/page/News

    Latest Stories:

    North’s newest bilateral school to officially open
    The north’s newest bilateral school, which caters for children of all abilities under one roof, was due to officially open today.

    Catholic schools out of Dickson
    Catholic schools are to withdraw from an education system that allows children into grammars without taking the 11-plus. …

  • Essentialist

    Six weeks too late Willis. Why do you regurgitate old news?
    Strabane non-denominational schools
    http://www.northernireland.gov.uk/news/news-de/news-de-october-2007/news-de-191007-education-minister-approves.htm

    Interesting to see that catholic schools won’t let you into a grammar without taking the 11-plus. I thought it was claimed by the Cardinal to be immoral?

  • Essentialist

    Visiting that foreign land.

    Jeja voodoo.

    The education Minister promised…..

    “We will want to consider the recommendations from the Working Group before making any longer-term decisions, but for children currently in P4, parents and teachers can be reassured that they will be advised in good time of the arrangements that will apply.”
    In conclusion, the Minister said: “This is an important and complex education issue and I believe that those who have experience of managing and administering the system are best placed to build on the progress that has been made and develop future arrangements that will enable all children in Northern Ireland to achieve.” (our goal of imposed comprehensives)

    Q. Where did it all go wrong? A. The advisors and administrators.

  • willis

    01/12/2008 :: Northern Ireland :: The Irish News

    The north’s newest bilateral school, which caters for children of all abilities under one roof, was due to officially open today.

    Always helps to actually read a post

  • Essentialist

    Did I say six weeks too late Willis? Make that ONE YEAR and six weeks. Just in case you didn’t read the link that you complain is necessary for you to analyse education matters.

    Having some difficulty swallowing your own words” Quote by all means, but without links your quotes lack context and lack the potential for further analysis” The Irish News may wish to employ you as a clerk in their archives dept.

    Context? Do try to stay on the thread. The real issue is P6 and the curriculum

  • willis

    PACE

    It would appear that, like Ms Ruane, you confuse intention with delivery.

    Easy mistake.

  • Essentialist

    Part of the latest “vision” or Sinn Fein “intention” to deal with Protestant underachievement. Ve Hav Vays.

    25/11/2008 from The Irish News.

    Education minister Caitriona Ruane has said there must be a zero-tolerance approach to the “shocking level of underachievement” among some schoolchildren.

    Answering questions at the assembly on how the Educational Skills Authority (ESA) will improve outcomes for learners, particularly for young Protestant boys Ms Ruane said that while many pupils achieve great things there are still too many who do not receive the help and support they need to reach their full potential.

    She said of children leaving primary school last year that one in every five moved into post primary education without having achieved expected levels in literacy and numeracy.

    The minister also said at GCSE level last year almost half of young people did not achieve at least a grade C pass in English and maths - 12,000 pupils.

    “This level of underachievement presents real challenges to boys,” she said.

    “In 2006-2007 some 44 per cent of Protestant boys left school with less than five GCSEs, grades A* to C. The figure for Catholic boys was 41 per cent.

    “Under the ESA there will be a significantly increased focus on the professional development of teachers and the enhancement of leadership skills among principals and boards of governors.”

    “We have to have a zero-tolerance approach to underachievement and we need to have measures in place that enable underachievement to be tackled,” she said.

    Teachers should beware under any ESA furheur although word from the classroom is that the brown shirts of the Inspectorate are already practicing their goose-stepping over resistant teachers.