Wheres the glory in bombing a rememberence day parade?

O’Neill highlights that today is the 21st anniversary of the Enniskillen Bomb.

  • Greagoir O’ Frainclin

    The Enniskillen bombing was deplorable and unforgivable!

  • emmett

    I agree and no disrespect but i seem to recall that this whole thing was brought up and argued about pretty bitterly no time ago

  • wild turkey

    Let it be

  • Rory

    Why of course there is no glory in such an act. Who, even among its perpetrators would argue that? It was a despicable act and as Greagoir says “deplorable and unforgivable”.

    But it was one of many despicable and deplorable acts of brutal violence perpetrated by activists from all groups, both state and paramilitary, during the conflict and to single one out is to invite a singling out of another atrocity committed by an opposing group and where is the future in that?

    The best we can do today to show our abhorrence of such deeds and our committment to seeing that they are never repeated is to move forward with the political processes whose beginnings heralded the start of the cessation of such carnage – from all sides. Wouldn’t you agree?

  • ulsterfan

    Rory

    We shall indeed move forward but never forget that PIRA committed this atrocity and it stands alone and is unique.

  • Oilifear

    “But it was one of many despicable and deplorable acts of brutal violence perpetrated by activists from all groups, both state and paramilitary …”

    No “but”, Rory. What you should write is simply that “it was one of many despicable and deplorable acts of brutal violence perpetrated by activists from all groups, both state and paramilitary …”

    We need to acknowledge each of these acts and their despicable and deplorable nature, one-at-a-time if need be, regardless of whether it was “them” or “us” that committed them. There are no “but”s because even in the most desperate of contexts these acts were deplorable and despicable, whether they were committed by the state or paramilitaries.

  • slug

    A terrible day. A tragic day. I will never forget it.

  • Maybe our bloggers could add a feature to Slugger that lists, on each day of the year, those people on all sides who were killed on that day. That way we would have the chance to equally remember those murdered by groups other than the IRA, and thus to counter the unfortunate appearance given by this topic that there is a hierarchy of victims.

  • RepublicanStones

    Terrible act and tragic.

    ‘..it stands alone and is unique.’

    How so? I would venture that Bloody Sunday (1920+72) and Omagh were worse. But whats the point of such an exercise?

  • Michael Shilliday

    Horseman,

    I fear that you don’t fully understand the situation which leads to your statement. The IRA murdered nearly half of all people who died during the troubles. So if you think there is more coverage given to those murders perpetrated by the IRA, that is simply because there are so many more of them.

  • We need to acknowledge each of these acts and their despicable and deplorable nature, one-at-a-time if need be, regardless of whether it was “them” or “us” that committed them. There are no “but”s because even in the most desperate of contexts these acts were deplorable and despicable, whether they were committed by the state or paramilitaries.

    Posted by Oilifear

    Indeed, but I fear as things are beginning to develop, contrition and exposure is being demanded of Republicans, whilst the other main parties to this conflict who have been involved in dastardly deeds, are being given a free ride by the media and State and anonymity.

    This being so and as the state itself is party to such crimes, it is increasingly clear that if there is to be any movement on this, an international commission must be set up to deal with the past. The members of which will need to be acceptable to both communities and the two governments.

  • ninthnov

    tomorrow is 9/11….can anyone explain why the yanks are so sad…what happened to them on the 9th of november?

  • Peter Brown

    Mick is the real problem that unless everyone agreees to co-operate it will be pointless?

    Considering Saville looks like it will top £200m what is it likely to cost? And what will it achieve?

    I know many niave ordinary unionists who find relatively tame books like The Dirty War hard reading – what would a T&R;Commission do to the general public?

  • Oilifear

    mick hall –

    “…contrition and exposure is being demanded of Republicans, whilst the other main parties … are being given a free…”

    I was agnostic to the RIR parade last week – to the extent that I was antagonistic to Republican opposition to it. Whatever about opposition to war/Iraq/Afghanistan, to oppose the parade on the basis that it was a parade of the British Army or a parade primarily symbolic of “them” was sectarian. It was also not the sort of politics that nationalists, or anyone, should be playing right now, when we should be building a shared/joint/mutual understanding/respect into the future and concentrating on forgiveness not grievances. But I thought that Peter Robinson’s comments that it would be an opportunity for Republicans to see “what a real army looks like” were unbelievable.

    I would have thought that over the course of 35 years Republicans and the British Army would have had plenty of opportunity to see what each other looked like. I thought his comment’s betrayed not only a desire to provoke, and a belief that contrition was not only unwarranted, but a sense of oblivion about the role of the British Army in the Troubles. (Or it may simply have been a play to the stalls.)

    So I agree with the sentiment of your post. I would, however, believe that a “home-grown” movement or change in attitudes, not necessarily institutionalised, to admit honestly to the past and not demand blame would be preferable to a “foreign” commission that would contrite on behalf of the people of Northern Ireland/Republic of Ireland-Britain. Enniskillen and today are as good a place and time to begin as any.

  • Dan Breen’s Revolver

    if we cant honor our dead in peace then why should anyone else was i think hte twisted logic for this act

  • Hmmm

    “The Enniskillen bombing was deplorable and unforgivable”

    Gordon Wilson proves the second part of your post wrong.

  • Michael Shilliday on Nov 08, 2008 @ 06:53 PM

    Rubbish.

    Each death is individual. If you have any respect whatsoever for your fellow human beings you would not try to elevate one or other death above others, because of whatever group the unfortunate victim belonged to. Until unionists ‘commemorate’ the deaths of all the victims they show themselves up as unfeeling bigots, who use certain deaths for political purposes, thereby debasing their so-called concern and directly insulting even those that they are claiming to commemorate. Shame on you for it.

  • oneill

    “Until unionists ‘commemorate’ the deaths of all the victims they show themselves up as unfeeling bigots, who use certain deaths for political purposes, thereby debasing their so-called concern and directly insulting even those that they are claiming to commemorate.”

    “Bigot” like “hierarchy of victims” is one of those words thrown round like confetti on here and it really doesnt push the debate forward. When the Relatives for Justice organised their protest last week should they also have carried pictures of the IRAs victims just for the sake of balance and because they didnt, does that make them also de facto bigots?

    Each of us has our own memory from the Troubles, one event which particularly shook us personally. For my sister it was the Sean Graham massacre, as she passed the scene literally thirty seconds before the carnage, for my dad it was the murder of Robert Bradford. For me, there are two events, the murder of Edgar Graham and Enniskillen. It doesnt mean that I cant and dont acknowledge the hurt caused during other tragedies.

  • Rory

    I have said before and I say again that the greatest wisdom I can turn to in agonies of this nature are the reported words of one Jesus, of Nazareth who said:

    “Let the dead bury the dead”,

    which I always found to be the most bewildering of his spoken words until political attempts at creating a favourable hierarchy of victims became apparent to me, firstly by an instinctive repugnance towards the sheer oiliness of those who pushed such an agenda.

    But then, not professing to be a Christian, I might have been mistaken. What do others think?

  • Dave

    That doesn’t mean what you want it to mean, i.e. that murderers should escape justice. It isn’t a doctrine, but a simple direction. Jesus directed a man who wanted to travel with him but could not do so presently because of the need to attend to the funeral preparations for his father to let those who were spiritually dead (those among the group who wouldn’t follow Jesus) to attend to the funeral preparations. Jesus was comparing the spiritually dead to the physically dead. Nothing else. Sorry it doesn’t mean “Let the Shinners get away with it.”

  • Harry Flashman

    Actually hard as it might be to believe I’m with Rory on this one, the massacre at Enniskillen was an appalling and dreadful act of mass murder and those who had any hand, act or part in it should be on their knees daily begging for forgiveness.

    However we must, if we are to get anywhere, start to put those awful dark days behind us, not to forget them or to dismiss them but if we are to use these events as a cudgel to beat the other lot over the head with then frankly we may simply start the whole business up again and be done with any hope for the future and in twenty years from now we’ll have a nice new set of atrocities to ‘celebrate’.

    I called the people who stood around Belfast waving pictures of people killed by the security forces and loyalist terrorists as ‘shroud wavers’, it’s a hard description but there’s an element of truth in it. Let those who were bereaved in the dreadful events of the ‘Troubles’ remember their losses and grieve with dignity, the rest of us who were not actually affected should not use their grief as some sort of party political score card to be used decades after the event.

  • earnan O’malley

    Stop commemorating every annual date of an atrocity. it doesn’t help.

  • PeaceandJustice

    Rory – “to invite a singling out of another atrocity committed by an opposing group .. where is the future in that?”

    Why then does SDLP-Sinn Fein-PIRA concentrate on one particular bloody Sunday in Londonderry? Where is the justice for the victims in Enniskillen? The Sinn Fein PIRA murderers responsible have not been held to account. And the majority of Roman Catholics in Fermanagh vote for the organisation which carried it out.

    The event in Londonderry has resulted in 922 witnesses called to give evidence including 505 civilians, nine forensic scientists and other experts, 49 journalists, photographers and camera operators and 245 military personnel; 40 politicians and civil servants, including intelligence officers, seven priests, 33 former members of the RUC and 34 members of terrorist organisations; 20 million to 30 million words including 13 volumes of photographs; 121 audiotapes and 110 videotapes.

    And some people think it’s too much to mention mass murder carried out in Enniskillen by the Sinn Fein PIRA gang? If the process of healing is to start, then Sinn Fein PIRA can’t keep denying their crimes and they should offer an unreserved apology to all their victims.

  • P@J

    Anyone who had ever been involved in a campaign against an in justice in the UK, will understand only to well how the British government [and governments elsewhere] kick such things into the long grass. If all else fails they offer a public inquiry. Those who are naive as to how governments operate and that is most of us, will rejoice believing they are going to get justice etc at last.

    It rarely happens via a public inquiry, instead they get an inquiry that is buried in a mountain of paper work and over seen by over paid members of the legal profession. There really is no surprise at the great cost of the Bloody Sunday inquiry, that was all planned for by the people who decided upon it. As to was the fact that the media would end up concentrating on this cost, rather than what ever it was the public inquiry was looking into. At worst as far as the government is concerned it will devalue the inquiries judgement, at best it will over ride it completely.

    However! that does not mean all inquiries and commissions need to be like that. Now does it. Every day there are commissions and inquiries taking place over all that moves under the sun. Most go about their business without having the need of a single highly paid brief.

    As a great spanish revolutionary once said, all you need to sit in judgment on your fellow man is a good heart.

  • PeaceandJustice

    To mick hall – concentrating on one particular bloody Sunday in Londonderry while ignoring many other bloody Sundays created by Sinn Fein PIRA murderers (e.g. Enniskillen) creates a hierarchy of victims. Yet that is exactly what the SDLP-Sinn Fein PIRA have been doing.

  • Turgon

    mick hall,
    “As a great Spanish revolutionary once said, all you need to sit in judgement on your fellow man is a good heart.”

    I trust you are not trying to suggest that that is a good idea. It is a pretty stunningly foolish idea. It depends purely on one’s definition of “A good heart.” I know this violates Godwin’s Law but I must point out that many people in Germany at the time thought that Heydrich was a great bloke: he was certainly cultured and intelligent as well as a mass murderer. Incidentally I always wonder if the German who plays the piano during the ghetto massacre in Schlinder’s List was a nod to Heydrich. I think he plays Mozart but cannot remember.

    I am sure there are a number of examples of equally cultured mass murderers with “a good heart” from numerous other regimes.

  • P@J

    Yes I am sure it does in some peoples minds and understandably so.

  • Shirley McGuffin

    Only the Irish would engage in cowardly bombing of civilians.

    “There is music in the midst of desolation
    And a glory that shines upon our tears.”

  • RepublicanStones

    Don’t watch the news much over the last few years do you Shirley.

  • mick hall,
    “As a great Spanish revolutionary once said, all you need to sit in judgement on your fellow man is a good heart.”

    I trust you are not trying to suggest that that is a good idea. It is a pretty stunningly foolish idea.

    Turgon

    No of course it is always better to have well trained members of the legal profession. People like Roland Freisler, at one time one of the most senior judges in Germany, did such a good job in administering justice.

    To praise the rule of law in the manner you have; and those that administer it on the very day of the anniversary of Kristallnacht * is skating on thin ice, in my humble opinion. Believe it or not, murdering people, stealing their possession’s and burning down homes was even illegal in nazi Germany, yet not one of those stout fellows of the then german legal profession let out the slightest whimper in protest.

    As I said, all you need to sit in judgement on your fellow man is a good heart, it is why the jury system is the finest system human kind has yet come up with; and why the Diplock courts shamed all those members of the north’s legal profession who sat in judgment and prosecuted within them.

    http://www.organizedrage.com/2008/11/kristallnacht-german-pogrom-of-9th.html

  • Congal Claen

    Hi Mick,

    “As I said, all you need to sit in judgement on your fellow man is a good heart, it is why the jury system is the finest system human kind has yet come up with; and why the Diplock courts shamed all those members of the north’s legal profession who sat in judgment and prosecuted within them.”

    Haughey’s Arms Trial?