National Trust plan to buy land around Causeway

Good news! Surely it’s high time for Seymour Sweeney to back off with dignity? Enough damage and delay have been caused. (In any comment about Mr Sweeney or another party, please remember the laws of defamation.) See here for a look at the development plans for the reception area.

  • Turgon

    Brian,
    I am sure Nevin can tell us but how close is Runkerry House to Runkerry Head and will the land enable anyone to walk anywhere near Runkerry House?

  • This coastal strip of land lies between Runkerry House – owned by Sweeney/Seaport (NI) Limited – and the Causeway Hotel. Part of the Causeway Coastal Path runs between Runkerry House and the encaged fisherman’s cottage and on eastward around the headland to the Giant’s Causeway. Will there continue to be access to this headland coastal path from Bushfoot Strand?

    AFAIK the Sweeney appeal against the overturning of that well known ‘minded‘ decision has yet to be heard. Will the appeal be heard before the NT visitor centre plan comes up for planning approval? According to the Grapevine, the answer is no.

  • joeCanuck

    Love that concept for the cafe. So obviously inspired by the rocks themselves.

  • tracey

    I think the design is lacking emotion. The whole concept seems like it was created in the 80’s and has lay dormant in the architect’s portfolio until now.

    Sorry, but as a designer I feel it doesn’t do anything for Irish/N.Irish design. It will become old before it’s time.

  • Turgon, click here for the satellite view of the 80-acre property. I’d think it would be most of the farmland north of Runkerry Road and the miniature railway station.

    AFAIK the other part of the path between Whitepark Bay and Ballintoy Harbour is possibly still obstructed.

  • 10. The law in Northern Ireland

    The public have no automatic right of access to the countryside in Northern Ireland. However, district councils can establish public rights of way where they believe a path would “add to the convenience or enjoyment of a substantial section of the public.” These rights of way are established under the Access to the Countryside (NI) Order 1983, which also has regulations obliging landowners to maintain access to paths once they have been created.

    You can find out about access to the countryside and current initiatives, such as the Ulster way and other ‘waymarked ways’, from the Environment and Heritage Service.

    Turgon and others, you might wish to contact Richard Lewis, Moyle District Council’s CEO, about the current status of the Causeway Coastal Path.

  • Ulsters my homeland

    I think the cafe looks real cool, (maybe not as cool as the Bird’s nest) However, I fear it’s going to be made with crap looking materials, as money has to be saved on something, as it’s N.Ireland.

  • LURIG

    Sorry to burst the bubble. A lovely part of the world but all I hear from tourists who go there is……….it was OK. Worth seeing but not worth going to see was the old mantra and that would appear to be apt. It has to be the most disappointing part of Tourist Ireland, built up to be a Wonder Of The World but a big let down. I had Australian relatives visit in June and they thought it was…….. something they missed as they couldn’t see what all the fuss was. EMPEROR’S NEW CLOTHES????????????

  • M Prince

    There is already a well used right of way from in front of Runkerry House around to the Causeway Centre. There was a lawsuit years ago when the original right of way was closed by you know who. The National Trust has maintained this right of way since then. This just makes it the legal property of the Trust. The land encompasses the pat and the fields along the path and not the Sweeeney owned lands inland near the “heritage train”.

  • McGrath

    EMPEROR’S NEW CLOTHES????????????

    Posted by LURIG on Aug 27, 2008 @ 03:26 AM

    You might be right but here is the thing. I went to the GCW about 20 years ago on a nice summers day, I might have been the only one there. I took my kids last week (one of the only dry days in for the past month) it was bunged, a queue of traffic out onto the road, hard to park, and the path down to the rocks as busy as Royal Ave.

    Bottom line is the demand is there, despite aesthetics.

    My American wife (and children) thought the walk and scenery was beautiful, and the rocks were nice too.

    Same thing with the Carrick-a-rede rope bridge, it used to be unsupervised when crossing it, now there is traffic control.

  • Prince, have you read the Arlene Foster reply to Jim Allister in post #2?

    .. the owner of the property .. indicated that a choice had to be made between closing off a section of the coastal path (which was also in his ownership) or providing a perimeter fence around the Cottage to prevent further damage

    This section of the Causeway Coastal Path lies between Runkerry House and the fisherman’s cottage.

    Has the owner provided evidence of such damage? What incidents were reported to the police? If the owner is so concerned about attacks on property why have gates to Runkerry House been left unlocked? Why does it not have a similar encircling fence?

    Perhaps Sammy Wilson, the new Minister of the Environment, will deal with access/footpath and razor-wire issues in this Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

  • fair_deal

    McGrath

    “I took my kids last week (one of the only dry days in for the past month) it was bunged, a queue of traffic out onto the road, hard to park, and the path down to the rocks as busy as Royal Ave.”

    Which will continue because the NT proposals are too small plus will do little if anything to address the issue of poor spend per visitor.

  • [aside]Cheer up fair_deal; enjoy some Fabulous Food and Classic Cars in Ballycastle – O 🙂

  • McGrath

    Which will continue because the NT proposals are too small plus will do little if anything to address the issue of poor spend per visitor.

    Posted by fair_deal on Aug 27, 2008 @ 02:12 PM

    I agree the NT proposal is too small and narrow. From a business POV, you have to offer something that gains satisfaction in return. Satisfaction is the key to gaining and retaining core business. Gouging at the gift shop wont work.

    I observed that people enjoyed the scenery as much if not more than the rock formation. You can tell a lot from what people are pointing their cameras at. However the walk up and down from the rocks is a strain for most, and the buses running up and down are an irritation.

    I would propose a Ski Lift down from the trail head to the rocks. How many people in Ireland have ever enjoyed a Ski Lift, and what better way to observe the scenery? People get in line to cross the 75ft Carrick-a-rede rope bridge, the most exciting ride in NI! If I were to get really carried away, I would suggest the Ski Lift ascend and decend the headland / cliff area to the RHS of the existing path to the rocks.

    I have no objections to private investment in and/or management of the site, but there has to be a clear and definable benefit to it.

    (I normally charge for marketing advise like this, I guess Slugger gets it for free)

  • slug

    McGrath

    That’s tacky.

  • McGrath

    McGrath

    That’s tacky.

    Posted by slug on Aug 28, 2008 @ 08:29 AM

    That depends on the design.

    As visitor volume increases to the site other measures will eventually take place which will inevitably cause an impact.

  • fair_deal

    McGrath

    “I agree the NT proposal is too small and narrow. From a business POV, you have to offer something that gains satisfaction in return.”

    The problem is the singular focus on the site and not looking at the broader context. Bushmills should be the gateway to Giants Causeway not a small visitor’s centre with inadequate parking. It would add more to the experience and increase the opportunity to increase spend per visitor.

    “I would propose a Ski Lift down from the trail head to the rocks”

    UNESCO will probably have kittens at the idea.