“There is an atmosphere of unresolved debate..”

It’s not the first time the Northern Irish Catholic bishops have called for greater clarity from the Education Minister, Sinn Féin’s Caitriona Ruane, about her vision for the future.. The BBC picks up on an Irish News report about a statement from the Catholic bishops. [subs req for now]

Catholic bishops have accused education minister Caitriona Ruane of creating “fear, uncertainty and instability” by a lack of clarity on proposals for school selection. The northern bishops say they are disappointed that, as another school year ends, key aspects of the minister’s plans remain unclear.

Adds The statement is online here

“While some have sought to claim the support of the Catholic Bishops for their approach to the current debate, we have scrupulously avoided endorsing the perspective of any political party or any specific structures to replace the 11+. We have indicated broad principles and with others have awaited specific proposals from the Department of Education about the way ahead.”

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  • Steve

    I suppose its a good thing that the Catholic Church is not a driving ethos in SF

  • ggn

    Maith thú a Chaitríona, coinnigh ag dul! Tá cothrom na féinne de dhíth orainn!

    Má tá na heaspaig do do ionsaí, caithfidh sé go bhfuil tú ar an bhealach ceart.

  • willowfield

    Interesting development, following previous Provo claims that the RC Church had “fallen into line”.

  • lamh dearg

    ggn

    but it’s not just the Bishops, it’s the parents, the teachers, every other political party, an increasing number of Sinn Fein supporters etc.etc.

    The days when you could measure success by annoying other people end when you accept power and become a Minister of The Crown. You then have to deliver.

    Catriona has not delivered and shows no signs of being able to deliver.

  • ulsterfan

    I am slowly coming to the view that she does not have any proposals.
    She reminds me of the Emperor who did not have any clothes and as each week passes SF become more ridiculous when trying to explain party policy.

  • willis

    Might actually be worth reading what they wrote.

    * “An education system which produces excellent academic results for some pupils up to A-level but has nearly half our 16 year olds leaving school with less than 5 GCSE A*-C grades cannot be considered either equitable or a success in Christian terms.”

    * “The term ‘catholic’ means universal. Thus, a school calling itself ‘Catholic’ cannot act in isolation from other Catholic schools or from the educational community as a whole.”

    * “It is specifically the Trustees who have ultimate responsibility for making and agreeing specific proposals for Catholic education with the statutory authorities.”

    * “Traditional distinctions between grammar and other types of schools are becoming increasingly meaningless. The 11+ selection system does however unfairly advantage grammar schools in terms of enrolment and sustainability.”

    * “We wish to state our clear opposition to the introduction of independent academic assessment tools by schools as a temporary or future means of pupil selection.”

    So not exactly an endorsement of the DUP then.

  • El Paso

    There is no such thing as a Northern Irish Catholic Bishop – the Catholic Church is an All-Ireland body.

    Catholic Bishops are called “Catholic Bishops”. The “Roman” bit is tag-on for eejits.

    The Bishops’ statement is pretty much the exact opposite to what FD presents.

    Not a bad thread otherwise.

  • Noel Treanor

    El Paso – there very much is a thing as a Northern Irish Catholic Bishop, though there are small in number. Only two dioceses are entirely in the North while three others are cross-border. Very, very specifically on the issue of education but on other social issues, the bishops with diocesan responsibilities in the North have come together as the N I Catholic Bishops.
    I shan’t wait on an apology.

  • William

    El Paso wrote:

    Catholic Bishops are called “Catholic Bishops”. The “Roman” bit is tag-on for eejits.

    Sadly El Paso, you are the eejit…the Anglican Church e.g. Church of Ireland is Catholic but not Roman, so the correct term for the church of Rome is the Roman Catholic Church. The use of the term ‘Catholic’ church is merely to try and impose a belief that they [the RC church] are the universal true church. That is fortunately not the case….that belief was overturned by the Glorious Reformation

  • Essentialist

    It is telling that when the Roman Catholic Bishops make statements on education there is invariably a mention of the term “catholic” contained therein. Is it used perhaps to appeal for some sort of wider support outside of their domain for a Catholic system of education. One need only examine enrolment of Catholics in integrated, controlled and so-called non-denominational voluntary grammmar schools to see that fear of losing influence in a secularised society motivates the Bishops more than academic selection.

  • William tells us:

    [i]”Sadly El Paso, you are the eejit…the Anglican Church e.g. Church of Ireland is Catholic but not Roman, so the correct term for the church of Rome is the Roman Catholic Church. The use of the term ‘Catholic’ church is merely to try and impose a belief that they [the RC church] are the universal true church.”[/i]

    Sorry, William, but I’m afraid that it is you who are wrong. The term “Catholic”, when used elsewhere in the name of a Church, indicates that the Church recognizes the Bishop of Rome as the head of the Church. Thus, we have the Greek Catholic Church and the Greek Orthodox Church, the Coptic Catholic Church and the Coptic Orthodox Church and some 20+ others with similar names. There are even a few Churches calling themselves Catholic which recognize the authority of the Bishop of Rome, but deny that Benedict is the true Bishop of Rome and successor of St. Peter, i.e. that someone else is the true Bishop of Rome and successor to St. Peter.

    The Orthodox Churches recognize a Patriarch as the head of the Church and each Church recognizes its own Patriarch. And, this, as I understand it is what the Anglican Church does, recognizes the Archbishop of Canterbury as the head of the the Church. Thus, it forfits the title of Catholic.

    Sorrym but, unless you are specifically talking about the Roman or Latin rite, the proper term for the Church is the Catholic Church, NOT the Roman Catholic Church.