“will actually lead to the loss of this man`s life..”

In the current dispensation the reports of the apology from the Sunday World to Freddie Scappaticci – who took action against the paper following a report which referred to his current living arrangements and medical condition, which was covered by an injunction he secured amid fears that his life could be under threat in the aftermath of the murder of Denis Donaldson – and their payment of his legal fees of £30,000 and a £10,000 donation to a charity are notable, in particular, for the comment from Scappaticci’s legal representative, Michael Lavery, QC.

Michael Lavery QC, for Scappaticci, claimed the article contained a “plethora of information” which could give clues to where his client`s current location. He said: “So long as people keep testing the limits of the injunction they always run the risk they will go too far and on some occasion will actually lead to the loss of this man`s life.”

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  • PeaceandJustice

    Given that Sinn Fein PIRA were able to murder Denis Donaldson without any political consequences, you can understand why Freddie Scappaticci took action against the paper.

  • Elvis parker

    As a law abiding citizen I ought to sympathise with Mr Scappaticci but I’m afriad I can’t

  • Debbie

    Elvis I know what you mean.

  • RepublicanStones

    P&J;why haven’t you handed the evidence you have over to the PSNI so as to secure a conviction for the murder of Mr Donaldson by Sinn Fein?

  • Neru

    ‘Stakeknife was Stakeknife when Squinter was only a pup’. I first heard that in Connolly Station, Dublin.

    One has to ask a few questions: Is anything sacred with Squinter? Is it money? Boys a boys… the power of a few quid…

  • Republican Stones – while I can’t totally disagree with the sentiment, such evidence would have to be presented to the Gardai as the murder occurred in the Republic of Ireland. As to the successful case Steaknife….sorry Mr Scappatticci pursued; well sloppy work from the SW. I worked as a journalist, dep ed and sub-editor for 6 years (and still pen the odd column, albeit on sports) and it has to be said the SW skims the shallow waters of barely legal on too many occassions

  • RepublicanStones

    Metal, your quite correct, you’ll forgive me the foopah as my main concern these days is the PSNI or as i prefer,the NIPS. Although driving home from work outta the Pale each week, I do encounter ‘da odd bleedin Gard !’

  • PeaceandJustice

    RS – “why haven’t you handed the evidence you have over to the PSNI so as to secure a conviction for the murder of Mr Donaldson by Sinn Fein?”

    You come on here every day making allegations against everyone else in your role as a cheerleader for Sinn Fein PIRA murder and torture. I assume we won’t see any further such posts from you in the future as you will be too busy discussing matters with the PSNI.

  • Belfast Gonzo

    This means the Sunday World (and editor) has been fined a grand total of £100,000 in the last two weeks. While one must wonder at the SW’s brazen, frequently inaccurate and sensationalist coverage of certain people, there must be similar amazement at the fines levied by the State to protect two terrorists, one from each side.

    Were they both working for it? Maybe this is Scap and Kincaid’s pension fund wrapped up…!

  • picador

    The law is an ass (and a very corrupt one at that). This man is allegedly a torturer and a multiple killer and yet he has this blanket protection. Why?

  • IRIA

    I think it was likely the dissidents who killed Donaldson. Didn’t the Sunday World also expose him?

  • Dave

    Alfredo Scappaticci had this to say about the Deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland in 1993:

    “He is ruthless. I can say this unequivocally. He has the final say on an informer, whether that person lives or dies. If it is an IRA volunteer who admits it [informing] he is court-martialled. Only two key people on the Army Council – that is, Martin McGuinness and Gerry Kelly, who acts as Adjutant General-make the decision. If he is not an IRA volunteer, it is Martin McGuinness who gives the say-so. It just needs McGuinness, he has the final say. That is 100 percent. If McGuinness is not about, [E] gives the order.

    Hegarty was an affront. He [McGuinness] took it very personally. There is something quite wrong with his head. He talks to you very quietly, very softly, but he would think nothing about putting us [the three in the car] down. He would be praying in chapel one minute, go outside and think nothing about ordering a shooting. Before Hegarty was shot I knew about it. A friend of mine was to interrogate Hegarty, but McGuinness, [A] and [F] interrogated him. McGuinness ordered his shooting.”

    Ian Paisley, speaking in the House of Commons debate in 2001, provided some background on the fate that befell Frank Hegarty at the hands of his fellow chuckle brother, Martin McGuinness:

    “Members should know for what type of people they are proposing to bend the rules.

    One of the saddest calamities in Londonderry was the death of Frank Hegarty, who was murdered on the instructions of Mr McGuinness.

    Mr Hegarty had worked for military intelligence and knew where some of the IRA’s most important arms and explosives were hidden in the Irish Republic.

    When the Irish police raided them the army, fearing that Mr Hegarty’s cover would be blown, pushed him away to England.

    Mr McGuinness then arrived on the doorstep of Rose Hegarty and told her that he wanted to talk about her son and how he could return.

    Twice a week for 13 weeks, Mr McGuinness dropped by, the family met him and they drank tea together.

    He assured the mother, Rose, that if Frank came home, he could sort the matter out and all would be well; a firm assurance for a mother’s heart torn about her son. She persuaded her boy to come home.

    A rendezvous was arranged by Mr McGuinness. Afterwards the body was found in a roadway in Tyrone, a bullet through the head.”

    Scappaticci, the second-in-command of the IRA’s Internet Security Unit, said “Hegarty came back because he was given assurances that he would be safe. You think life is sweet when those assurances come from the top man – Martin McGuinness. He gave his word of honour. McGuinness told Frank and his family he would be taken over the border to meet three prominent people in the IRA Army Council. McGuinness was part of the Army Council who first interrogated Hegarty, court-martialled him and then ordered him to be shot. Inside the IRA it was known from the moment those guns were found that Frankie was ‘going for his tea’. That was it. He was a dead man. It’s not important who pulled the trigger. McGuinness wouldn’t dirty his hands with that.”

    Of course, what Scappaticci doesn’t tell you is that he himself shot Frank Hegarty, and that he also shot up to 40 other ‘informers’ on the orders of the Deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland. So there you have it, a British agent who is second-in-command of the IRA’s ISU and also served on its Northern Command, has vital information about conspiracy to commit murder involving the Deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland and, oddly enough, no-one wants to arrest him for questioning about it, despite the supporting testimony of Frank Hegarty’s mother and the FRU handler of Frank Hegarty that Deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland lured Frank Hegarty to his death.

    In response to the question from journalist Chris Entwistle “How many executions would you say McGuinness has authorised over the years?”, Scappaticci replied, “He’s responsible for the majority. If you met him in his role in Sinn Fein, he is a nice plausible person. But in his role in the IRA, he is a cold, ruthless person. He sends a shiver down your back. At IRA meetings, he is businesslike. You don’t get much chit-chat out of him.”

    Indeed.

  • Dave

    ‘Internet Security Unit’ – should read “Internal Security Unit”!

  • heck

    Salvatore Gravano, aka Sammy the Bull, was a US government informant who went into the US witness protection program after selling out his boss John Gotti. He was number 2 in the Gambino crime Family. When US reporters uncovered Sammy in living in Arizona the US could not stop the press from reporting on his whereabouts or describing his life style and business activities. Nor were the US authorities able to fine newspapers for their reporting. That is called a free press.

    Now about that idiot on slugger who said he was proud to be British because it had a free press…..

  • Sounds like more late night work by ‘Martin Ingram’- the deep FRU source who fitted out Scap for much of what ‘Steak knife’ and Captain Simon Hayward had arranged, especially Frank Hegarty’s murder.

    Hegarty would not have been at risk if Hayward had not tipped off PIRA security about his being a tout by prematurely raiding the arms depots in the Republic, and whisking him off to England despite the assurances Brian Nelson had made to Hegarty.

    It’s all most convenient to blame this British betrayal and sloppy work now on Martin McGuinness, no matter who actually did in Hegarty in the end.

    Welcome back, Dave.

  • lololol

    lol @ ingram…see another one of your fru men, hitler breslin, is looking to open a 32 csm cumann in shantallow..do you guys never give up?

  • And in talking about the problems that Hayward created for Hagarty, I forgot to mention that Brian Nelson had to flee to West Germany in fear of his life because of Hagarty’s outing.

    Once this crisis had passed for Nelson, he came back to Northern Ireland to infiltrate the UDA, helping get rid of people like Francisco Notarantonio and James Pratt Craig in order to protect ‘Steak knife’s continuing efforts.

    Any thoughts yet about who he really is from our news hungry bloggers, especially since Ed Moloney has not yet really done anything serious about it despite all his self-serving comments about his career as a reporter?

  • Supatra

    Ah Trow Ford,
    How are you my old chum? Are you just out for the weekend or has the mental hospital released you for good? Love to meet up for a good Thai meal sometime and talk about Olaf.

  • RepublicanStones

    ‘You come on here every day making allegations against everyone else in your role as a cheerleader for Sinn Fein PIRA murder and torture. I assume we won’t see any further such posts from you in the future as you will be too busy discussing matters with the PSNI.’

    Good man P&J;so you admit that your assumption that Sinn Fein killed Donaldson, is exactly that, an assumption? With emphasis on the Ass.

  • 25

    the Sunday World has a lot to answer for,week after week they name people saying they have done this and that with no proof,if there was proof that people did something then why are they not charged with it by the police,all the Sunday World is,is a name and shame paper

    How many people have appeared in the Sunday World have been shot dead….a brave few id say!!!

    bit like when “one of the own “was shot dead while out with his wife,they say it was A,B,and C who done it,but the police cant charge the people

  • Love to meet up with you too, Supatra, so that we could talk more about what happened to Olof Palme, thanks, it seems, to Hayward and his chums like you, especially this latest bit which is catching everyone’s attention:

    http://codshit.blogspot.com/

  • Jo

    I heard earlier today the SW self promotion for an article which (based on protection rackets)
    “still has the capacity to blow the peace process apart”.

    Cheers, Jim. Here’s hoping huh?

  • Resolve

    No matter what Scappaticci did or did not do, it is simply unacceptable for the press to publish such details in the context of a very real threat to his life.

    The London courts have granted similar injunctions in respect of the Jamie Bulger murderers and also Maxine Carr (to name but two). This is hardly a new precedent.

  • Debbie

    Trowbridge,

    Are you 007 per chance?

    Had a look at your shi*e sorry site, and I’m left wondering can a cod actually shi*e?

  • Ard Eoin

    Why do people get on their high horses to defend the right to life/secrecy of a man whom it is alledged is responsible for multiple murders? If he was an agent of the crown and if he acted in the way he is alledged to have acted in the execution of informants why does anyone wish to protect him?
    He is viewed by republicans as touting scum and if the allegations against him are true he was able to act with impunity from both sides in commiting serial killings. Regardless of opinion this man has been implicated in mulitple murders and yet the british government continue to protect him. Once again when it comes to justice the government are left wanting, there can be no proper peace in the north until the british admit their role and also admit the crimes that their agents commited ‘in the defense of law and order’. The most striking news of the week was the announcement that the government are once again refusing justice to the Finucane family, now the courts serve to protect alledged agents of the crown, without justice how can the Irish people be expected to accept that society has changed? It is time that unionists accepted that they have been willing pawns in a conflict designed to maintain british rule in the north and continue the conflict until they are finished using the north as a training ground for their troops. The sooner that unionists are able to assert their independence from british misrule then the quicker we can move on to a real and lasting peace.

  • Reader

    Ard Eoin: Why do people get on their high horses to defend the right to life/secrecy of a man whom it is alledged is responsible for multiple murders?
    If you want him dead, campaign to change the law. For the moment, neither the UK nor the RoI has the death penalty, nor has Scap been convicted. Or, if it’s OK to go around killing killers, then there’s an awful lot of people on the same list as Scap – also mostly not convicted.
    And if your story is correct, then the British Government is also protecting a lot of Republicans fingered by Scap over the years. Are they on *your* list too? Or are they excluded?

  • RepublicanStones

    ‘neither the UK nor the RoI has the death penalty’

    “at least not officially anyway”

    from

    ‘Famous Last Words’
    Chapter 15
    By Dr David Kelly

  • TAFKABO

    So RS, you take people to task for making unfounded allegations, but reserve the right to make them yourself, and in the same thread no less.

  • I think that this thread shows the hollowness of protecting covert agents from disclosure for fear that a free discussion of what they did might result in their being killed – what has been used in spades by reporters like Ed Moloney and Peter Taylor in covering up The Troubles.

    The agents should have thought of this risk when they took the job, and planned accordingly.

    We cannot have a free society – one where there is free discussion for purposes of real democratic government – when the most important players are protected under a veil of secrecy.

  • RepublicanStones

    Sorry TAF, but P&J;said that Sinn Fein murdered Donaldson as if it was a statement of FACT. Read post 1 of this thread. You can allege away so long as you admit thats what it is, an allegation.

  • Ard Eoin

    Reader
    My question was why are some many people keen to defend his right to life/secrecy? If you have taken this as a call for his execution then you are misinterpretating my sentiment. This man is being protected by the british state when he should be tried for his crimes, but the state don’t want to try him as it will open the lid on british policy in the north and reveal it for what it was.

  • Resolve

    Ard Eoin

    What you say may (or may not) have the merit you think it does, but none of your points address the main issue.

    Fundamental Human Rights are exactly that – fundamental – that is, they apply to saints and sinners alike. You may not go along with this philosophy, but such an understanding has been developed over centuries of honest reflection. If they are compromised, then it is not too long before we compromise the very society we set out to protect.

  • Ard Eoin

    Reslove
    My point is that the brits are protecting someone who they alledgedly allowed to commit multiple killings. Is the most fundamental of human rights not the right to life? The british government is complicit in collusion and murder of people whom they would class as their own citizens, not only that but if all of the stories regarding stakeknife are credible they also allowed Francisco Notarantonio to be sacrificed in order to keep their key asset in place. Society has already been compromised by the actions of the british government, and in their continued protection of their alledged agent whilst refusing to give the victims of this man justice they are continuing their war-crimes against the Irish people.

  • And don’t forget that the real ‘Steak knife’aka DUKE had set up Captain Simon Hayward on a false charge of drug-trafficking in Sweden because of all the killings he had done in Northern Ireland, especially the Shoot-to-Kill ones in South Armagh in the fall of 1982, and what the Provos had learned from Michael Bettaney while he was on remand in Brixton for spying for the Soviets.

    And DUKE doesn’t look anything like Freddie Scappaticci.

    This is the compromise that MI6 and the FRU had worked out with ‘Steak knife’ when he discovered that Simon Hayward was working with his brother Christopher in trying to assassinate Gaddafi when the mission now was to capture his weapons on the Eksund for the Provos.

    Simon Hayward tried to get his buddies back in N. I. to assassinate ‘Steak knife’ while his appeal was pending, but Brian Nelson and the FRU redirected it against Notarantonio.

    In short, the Brits were as deep in shootings as the Provos were, but we have never learned half of the story because of their most corrupt media.

  • Dave

    Ard Eoin, who promoted Frank Hegarty to the role of Quartermaster in Derry when he was a British agent? That would be Martin McGuinness. Now if you want to betray the location of your stock to arms to the authorities without getting fingered for the betrayal, then a good way of doing it is to appoint a British agent as Quartermaster. Then you can make a big song and dance about how betrayed you were and swear vengeance on the culprit, being quick to kill him before he and others cop-on to the bigger picture. Likewise, who kept Scappaticci on in his role as the IRA’s counter-spy officer despite being one of the IRA’s most senior spies in the employ of British Intelligence? Standard protocol is to rotate those roles to avoid long term infiltration of them, yet this was not done under the McGuinness/Adams leadership. Why not? If your means of detecting British agents within your organisation is controlled by British agents, then it doesn’t take a genius to figure out that your organisation will soon be heavily infiltrated by British agents. Was that the result of an act of monumental incompetence by the McGuinness/Adams leadership or was it by design? Why did McGuinness insist on increasing the violence in his role as OC of the IRA’s Northern Command and in his role as a member of its 5-man Army Council when he was warned (by Brendan ‘The Dark’ Hughes among others) that the IRA did not have the capacity to do this, leading to disastrous results for them… not least the members in Tyrone? Who Ok’ed the murders of fellow IRA that Scappaticci carried out in his role as ISU man/British agent? That would be, as Scappaticci said, either Martin McGuinness or Gerry Kelly (with Martin McGuinness Ok’ing the majority of the murders). If you want to know about collusion, look to those who are now administering British rule in the United Kingdom and who were given an electoral mandate to do so by Nationalists.

    One last point in regard to this thread’s title, as the post about Frank Hegarty shows, reasurrances from Sinn Fein that people are not under threat from the IRA are absolutely meaningless. As Scappaticci said, “See if someone in the IRA says, ‘I swear to God,’ or, ‘I swear on my mother’s life,’ then you know you are getting double-crossed. That’s the code word. You say, right – bolt. Bolt.”

  • Resolve

    Ard Eoin

    As a matter of journalistic ethics (not to mention their obligations under a.2 ECHR – right to life – and a.8 ECHR – privacy, etc)…

    Do you, or do you not, think that the press (or broadcasters) should be legally permitted to release the details of Scappaticci’s whereabouts, knowing all the time that there is an imminent threat to his life which may be prompted my such publication?

    It’s a simple question…

  • Ard Eoin

    Resolve
    If the press wish to release the details “knowing all the time that there is an imminent threat to his life which may be prompted my such publication” then they know the repurcussions they will face. Are you trying to tell me that if some hack from the SW knows where he is that others don’t? The threat to his life was brought upon himself and his paymasters and as the saying goes ‘live by the sword, die by the sword’. This whole argument revolves around the rights of the individual, in this case a man who alledgedly spied on his comrades and sent numerous people to an early grave. In a war if a soldier is caught spying for the enemy he is shot, the SW are just doing what can be expected from a tabloid, trying to sell papers with sensationalist journalism. I don’t care where he is, be it blackpool or southern italy, I am sure you have heard as many rumours as I have, but what I do care about is the way he was alledgedly allowed to murder with impunity at the behest of his british masters. Everything else concerning this individual is basically a smoke screen to hide the undeniable truth – the british government colluded with paramilitaries for their own gain and did not care a jot for the basic human rights of anyone in the north of Ireland.

  • Resolve

    Ard Eoin

    The issue of the British government’s reluctance to make amends for their part in this whole saga is a very separate issue from that which prompted the beginning of this thread.

    You say:

    “SW are just doing what can be expected from a tabloid, trying to sell papers with sensationalist journalism”

    But press freedom is not unqualified, nor should it be. There is a simple matter at hand here, and that is the boldness of the SW in testing the limits of the restraint imposed upon them by law. In these circumstances, such a breach could have fatal consequences, and as such must be treated with gravity.

    I agree with you that this relatively benign point fades into insignificance when one reflects upon all that has gone before (and all that has not yet come to light). However, you make the valid point that if the SW know others are bound to know too. If others do, and have chosen not to act, then there is no threat to this life anyway. The granting of this benign and specific injunction does nothing to affect the British government’s stance on the broader issues at hand.

  • Resolve

    Ard Eoin

    The issue of the British government’s reluctance to make amends for their part in this whole saga is a very separate issue from that which prompted the beginning of this thread.

    You say:

    “SW are just doing what can be expected from a tabloid, trying to sell papers with sensationalist journalism”

    But press freedom is not unqualified, nor should it be. There is a simple matter at hand here, and that is the boldness of the SW in testing the limits of the restraint imposed upon them by law. In these circumstances, such a breach could have fatal consequences, and as such must be treated with gravity.

    I agree with you that this relatively insignificant issue fades into insignificance when one reflects upon all that has gone before (and all that has not yet come to light). However, you make the valid point that if the SW know others are bound to know too. If others do, and have chosen not to act, then there is no threat to this life anyway. The granting of this benign and specific injunction does nothing to affect the British government’s stance on the broader issues at hand.

  • Debbie

    I agree with resolve, what ever he has done, or has been accused off is not the issue here, although I can understand why some would think it. But his right to privacy and protection is the same as any other citizen. Lets face it fact is fact he has never been put infront of any court. But whether he has or not is still a moot point, resolve is right – press freedom is not unqualified.