Silence in the Ulster air

Alan in Belfast has already picked up on the Northern Ireland confidential blog. I love the latest post – we’re just so much more civilized here!

  • monaman

    Here, or is it there?

    You partitioned Ulster, remember.

  • PeaceandJustice

    To monaman – Ulster as in Northern Ireland. Or maybe you prefer the 9-county version drawn up during Elizabethan times. While some sporting groups use the Elizabethan Ulster, you should remember that Ulster has changed in size over the generations.

  • monaman

    P&J;,

    “While some sporting groups use the Elizabethan Ulster, you should remember that Ulster has changed in size over the generations.”

    Tell me, P&J;, when you fed that line to the UVF men of the wee three (2000 in Cavan alone) back in ’22, how did it go down?

  • Quiz Master

    Peace and Justice down the barel of a loyalist gun has gone quiet

  • PeaceandJustice

    To monaman – you can’t deny that Ulster has changed over the centuries. It’s interesting that you support the lines drawn up by English officials during Elizabethan times.

    To Quiz Master – I don’t and have never supported terrorism of any kind. Can you say the same?

  • John Hussey

    Good to see Michael Shilliday with his finger on the PULSE of topical issues as usual…

  • monaman

    P&J;,

    answer the question, you straight-talking Ulster Prod you.

  • PeaceandJustice

    To monaman – ask sensible questions and you will get answers. Around the time the border was set up many people may have had a different definition of Ulster. The point is – and I repeat – that Ulster has changed over time. You obviously have a deep affection for the lines drawn up by English officials during Elizabethan times.

  • Alan

    Ulster is nine counties and NI is six of those counties. NI isn’t Ulster, it’s part of Ulster.

    I wouldn’t say to a Cavan, Monaghan or Donegal man they aren’t Ulster men because NI Protestants think they can claim “Ulster” as a Protestant province when there’s as many Catholic Ulstermen.