Paisley junior, the DUP and Hamlet

The demise of Paisley junior has indeed been pretty sudden. Fair_deal’s take below agreeing with Suzanne Breen’s suggestion that this is the DUP responding decisively to the Dromore by election is interesting though Jim Allister has noted on his own web site, that although accelerated by, this is not solely due, to Dromore. Clearly Paisley junior had become a distraction as he himself noted in his resignation speech.Some have again seen the hand of Peter Robinson (none more poetically than our own Darth Rumsfeld) in all this preparing the way for Paisley senior’s departure. The obvious lack of support given to Paisley junior by the likes of Gregory Campbell could indeed imply that this was a group knifing demanded by Robinson (et tu Brute?) Certainly this may represent a significant attempt by Robinson to put a stop to the recent problems, further isolate Paisley senior and yes, also make a positive change after Dromore. Had the DUP wanted to ensure no one drew Dromore parallels they could have finished Paisley junior’s ministerial career earlier or indeed left it a while. However, to do it now means that it is part of the response to the election. Such a major move as dumping Paisley junior after what was only a council by election has the whiff of panic about it and may also be seen as the gaining of a little more momentum by the TUV. In addition getting rid of junior will not reduce senior’s love in with McGuinness which is, I submit, an even bigger problem.

I have suggested before that Robinson has made one mistake after another in his handling of Jim Allister’s defection, the TUV and Dromore and it is possible that this is yet another error. One of the reasons for this litany of errors is that Robinson never factored into his analysis being attacked by a competent opponent from his right flank least of all a competent opponent who he helped create.

So this may be a decisive response to Dromore and a way to damage Paisley senior. Alternatively it may be another error; the unionist electorate and the DUP itself will be the judges of that. If, however, they decide the latter then Robinson should start to worry and he should remember that politically wounded (quite possibly fatally) as Paisley senior is; he might yet with his last act drive the stake into Robinson. The stage could be set for an end beyond even a Shakespearian tragedy. The closest I can think of is Hamlet. I do not know if Robinson is a fan of literature but maybe he should remember Hamlet who kills the King Claudius but having been wounded by a poisoned sword himself dies; leaving Fortinbras to claim the throne. (Dodds?)

  • willis

    I was kinda hoping for Titus Andronicus.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titus_andronicus

  • Turgon

    willis,
    Thanks, I thought about that one but the fact the DUP are not not all related put me off.

  • Turgon, Fortinbras translates as Armstrong and it seems Billy and the Paisleys have something in common!!

  • Paul P

    Turgon,

    Are you not overplaying “panic” in the DUP a bit?

    Sharp, swift action taken with the agreement of all in top tier leadership of the DUP, excluding the Rev Ian of course. I reckon DUP leaders (plural) would have been waiting for an excuse to offload Junior, especially since the revelations of him lobbying on behalf of his consituents at St Andrews.

    There is no chance of Robinson repeating the mistakes of Trimble and Empey when voters started deserting them.

    Secondly, how exactly would Paisley Snr drive the stake into Robinson? Surely he is just the figurehead leader now after all his loafing about with Marty and Bertie?

  • Hamlet, I.ii.47-9:

    The head is not more native to the heart,
    The hand more instrumental to the mouth,
    Than is the throne of Denmark to thy father.

    Can we consider what it is that makes the DUP? In the past it has been one particular brazen mouth (King John, III.iii.38), but more recently an itching palm (Julius Caesar, IV.iii.9).

    So, a few starting theses:

    A political party hangs together either by some binding ideology or (at the lowest level) because otherwise the members hang separately.

    In the present context, then, what is the ideological glue in the DUP?

    Is there any example of any political party being held together indefinitely by a cult of personality?

    That includes the cults of Lenin, Mao, Thatcher, de Valera et al.
    Is Robinson, now anointed heir-apparent, by personality, presence or sheer discipline likely to retain the DUP as an entity? To put that another way, O Peter, thou hast prevailed in right! (II Henry VI, II.iii.100).
    If not:

    Has not Allister opened a credible bolt-hole to the Right of the DUP?
    What happens if the UUP can regain credibility to the centre-right of the DUP?

    How long before we hear, from Troilus and Cressida, II.i.129:

    I will keep where there is wit stirring and leave the faction of fools.

    I know that doesn’t move the argument forward, but I found it fun.

  • joeCanuck

    “swift action” Paul P.?

    Have you been away on an extended holiday?

  • Turgon

    Paul P,
    To change plays to MacBeth

    Act 5 Scene 7
    MacBeth:….I bear a charmed life, which must not yield To one of woman born.

    MacDuff: Despair thy charm, And let the angel whom thou hast served Tell thee: MacDuff was from his mother’s womb Untimely ripped.

    Or to be more prosaic and quote H.H. Asquith “Wait and see”

  • Interested Observer

    Robinson is a sharp political operator, I can’t believe he would have let the situation around Junior develop and run for so long, before dealing with it. The DUP has been grouping around Robinson for some time now – alot of the new intake of MLA’s are all in Robinson’s camp. The Doc unfortunately has cut adrift his most loyal support base by signing the deal with SF and his subsequent behaviour.

    From Robinson’s point of view he needed the Doc until the deal with SF was done, once the Doc signed the deal he was vunerable.

    It is interesting that you rarely see Robinson photographed with SF.

  • Paul P

    Turgon,

    I have to admit you have added a whole new demension to debating on this blog!

  • red branch

    It was said that Robinson brought back Allister to prevent Boxcar Willie getting the European nomination but what he didn’t reckon on getting was Boxcar Willie with brains – and that’s what Allister is!

  • JJ

    Any ideas on who will replace him?

  • Ahem

    I think it’s perfectly feasible that even in his irrevocably decayed state, Pasiley senior could take Robinson down with him in a some sort of scorpion sting. The Punt has to be aware of that, so easing the ould fool out has to be ginerly done, by a 1000, or at the very least, a few hundred cuts. And defenestrating baby Doc, for a variety of reasons, gets you a few dozen of those cuts inflicted. It’s certainly a very useful marker laid down to Paisley senior, without strictly speaking being a formal, decalred attack on him.

    As far as ‘Robinson got Allister back in …’ goes – this is surely greatly overdone? We shouldn’t underestimate (I speculate, having zero inside knowledge) the degree to which Paisley a.) retained personal affection for Allister, and thus eased JA’s way back on that score alone & far more importantly, b.) the degree to which Paisley had then still enough nous to realise the best way potentially to rein in Robinson’s ambitions was of course to give him a plausible rival for the succession. So, strictly speaking, I don’t think it’s fair to say from either Paisley or Robinson’s perspective at the time that getting Allister back in was a culpable mistake. Robinson certainly is serious about wanting to get more ‘talent’ into Unionism, and say what you will about Allister, but he’s damn sight more able than most of the gombeen men up at Stormont.

    And one other thing: people like me, traditional – essentially Ulster – Unionists, *never* liked Paisley, but as (the Vanguard blow-in) Trimble set about handing Unionism to him on a plate, there wasn’t much we could do about it. Paisley, in his critique of Trimble’s supine and cack-handed implementation of the Agreement was unfortunately in this regard, as the electorate kept telling us in ever larger tallies, right. Thus the faux-Doc finally got to the slot he always wanted, and as I say, just as the likes of Enoch always predicted he would, Paisley immediately behaved in a way that Captain O’Neill, never mind Brookeborough, would have considered interning him for. But that was very much then. This is very much now, and Paisley’s conduct of himself in office *is* debilitating Unionism, and there are no reasonable grounds for supposing that he can ever again raise his game to even merely ‘barely adequate’. So he has to go, and the sooner the better. Hence when he does, Unionism as a whole will benefit, as Robinson will run a much sharper machine. Remove Paisley and very soon thereafter the spotlight will switch back to the understandably vast tensions within partition-administering ‘nationalism’.

  • Interested Observer

    Who replaces Junior is the litmus test. If a Robinson clone (as I suspect) gets the job then it is clear the Big man is on borrowed time.

    If Paisley has any clout left it will be someone like Morrow or Storey possibly Campbell as a compromise candidate.

    The next few months won’t see the internal workings of the DUP far from the news front page.

    I’m sure TUV can’t believe the impact they are having.

  • Ahem

    It’s of course the impact, and then some, the UUP could be having if they had the wit to, at least some of the time, attack the DUP from waht we will veyr loosely call ‘the right’. It worked in spades for Blair versus the Tories in both 97 and 2001, and it amazes me that the doctrinaire liberals who infest this place are so determined to stay convinced that it wouldn’t work at the provincial level.

  • GavBelfast

    I must be one of the few people who actually regrets Jnr’s departure.

  • “I have grown increasingly frustrated by this campaign of personal bitterness, of jealousy and indeed of perception against me.”

    Can someone provide some clarification?

  • Belfast Gonzo

    Turgon

    Someone has at last provided me with the perfect opportunity to misquote Shakespeare:

    Alas poor Junior, I knew of him well.

  • doctor

    Malcolm, you raised some interesting points about what exactly is holding together the DUP. I would still say Paisley Sr. If you looked at the statements coming from many prominent DUP figures just prior to St. Andrews, there didn’t appear to be a snowball’s chance in hell of a deal. When Papa Doc gave his official seal of approval, the majority of these figures suddenly fell into line, most likely out of loyalty rather than anything else. These figures probably aren’t thrilled with the Chuckle Brothers routine, but probably aren’t willing to openly revolt over against Paisley about it. When Paisley goes, I don’t see the same kind of leader loyalty whether it is Robinson or anyone else. I don’t know if it will ever get to UUP-proportions, but the post-Paisley DUP might be in for its share of divisions.

    I’m not sold on Robinson being a Machiavellian figure sharpening the knife first for Junior, now Senior. Let me correct that…he’s a Machiavellian figure, but I’m not sure that this is all a master plan to get rid of his boss. Robinson was firmly on the pragmatic wing leading up St. Andrews, with two of his biggest allies actually being the Paisleys. Robinson was up for a deal, but I don’t think he could have pulled it off without the Paisley blessing mentioned above that pretty much dampened opposition at the critical moment. If I were Robinson, I wouldn’t necessarily want to ditch Senior just yet because he’s an effective shield against a serious internal revolt. If Paisley goes now, it will be Robinson who will have to deal with the significant element of the party that never lost its initial suspicions of the agreement.

  • joeCanuck

    Very good, Gonzo.

  • joeCanuck

    Interesting and plausible analysis, doctor.

  • Buggerhed

    “If Paisley has any clout left it will be someone like Morrow or Storey possibly Campbell as a compromise candidate.”

    Either of those would be interesting choices. I understand that before 2004 Jim beat off (excuse the pun) DUP stalwarts Maurice Morrow and Paul (not a fruit but a) Berry. So Maurice might be groomed here for further afield.

    Or Storey could be groomed as next North Antrim MP?

    What happens in North Antrim at the next GE is anyone’s guess. I wonder when Sr steps down/is thrown out, will a new MLA be co-opted?
    If so will they or Jr run for Westminster?

    Lastly, anyone got any idea whether Gregory is a Dodds or Punt supported?

  • Buggerhed, it looks as if the ‘lazy journalists’ have answered Gregory’s prayer:

    “Having said that, planning applications submitted by the developer in question have caused difficulties for many people in the past. Many of them have been in my constituency, and I have represented constituents in opposition to some of those applications. However, this planning application is completely separate and different to any of those. I have never come across any planning application, either from this applicant or anyone else, of this nature. There are no similarities in that respect. Given that background and that context, however, this entire process, from today, must be subjected to the closest possible scrutiny. If it were not, I would totally and unequivocally oppose it without reservation.

    These perceptive words will have been noted!!

  • So it’s all a matter of:

    Bonny sweet Robin is all my joy

    Ophelia in Hamlet, IV.v.127, and look what she got for her troubles.

    Glad to see those thoughts from Ahem @ 10:05 PM:

    I’ll be with you again
    In a trice,
    Like to the old Vice,
    Your need to sustain;
    Who, with dagger of lath,
    In his rage and his wrath,
    Cries, ah, ha! to the devil.

    (Twelfth Night, IV.ii.132-8)

    and doctor @ 11:00 PM:

    Bully, doctor!

    Merry Wives, II.iii.18.

    Pertinent analyses, both.

    Whichever way one adds it up, I do not see the present DUP holding together, and not just for reasons of personal ambition. As it is composed, the DUP is an unstable coalition of the townlands’ “No surrender!” and urban opportunism. I assume Robinson to be the main exponent of the latter:

    Am I politic? Am I subtle? Am I a Machiavel?

    Merry Wives, again, III.i.103.

    And, if he’s not, then the game is surely up, for the forces behind the smooth face of Allister have the potential to hoover up the backwoodsmen vote, leaving Robinson as Trimble was.

    Then it comes down to delivery. So far it’s been clear sailing, but NI (like Scotland: read between the lines in Gordon Brown’s apparent support for local tax-raising powers) is not going for ever to be isolated from the economic storms outside. And the life-expectancy of the Treasury cheques are being curtailed by the month. I doubt that Robinson’s successor will have has many goodies to dispense. Who gets the blame?

    Looking beyond the Paisley years is the current vogue, but for the DUP:

    Alas!
    There is no more such masters: I may wander
    From east to occident , cry out for service,
    Try many, all good, serve truly, never
    Find such another master.

    Cymbeline, IV.ii.370.

    Hey, not bad for 4am!

  • In the previous, forgive my failure to agree a subject and verb. As for the same in Bill, that’s down to him.

  • USA

    I come to bury Junior, not to praise him.
    Julius Caesar
    I’m so glad this scumbag has been forced to resign. Typical that he blamed everyone else for HIS conduct.
    No shame in him.

  • Jo

    Paisley’s conduct of himself in office *is* debilitating Unionism

    How?

    Remove Paisley and very soon thereafter the spotlight will switch back to the understandably vast tensions within partition-administering ‘nationalism’.

    To what end? You would like this to be expresed in violence?

  • Ahem

    Yeah Jo, well done for uncovering me. All that previous, tediously consistent flim flam about constitutionalism, and opposition to terrorist murder – all a cover. Alternatively, take the pills Jo, they really are for your own good.

  • Dewi

    Topical Should be a good read.

  • Jo @ 12:09 PM:

    You would like this to be expresed in violence? [sic]

    Why bother asking such a question? Anyway, the general mood is that “violence” is now reduced to the weirder fringes, on both sides. As a result NI in general, and even the old hot-spots in particular are better than (say) Manchester (GB) on an average Saturday, and one heck more so than Birmingham (Alabama) any time. With rare and noteworthy exceptions, they always were.

    The grim times are not going to return: too many of the former bad-boys have their fingers in the pie and snouts in the trough. It is the duty of the smart-arses who frequent Slugger and similar haunts to try to keep them as clean as may be. We’re not doing too badly, either.

    So, if you seriously believe the peace of the North depends on the infinite survival of the Reverend Doctor, presiding over a spoils-culture and kleptocracy, start a campaign to have him stuffed and mounted, a simulacrum as our local Lenin. Meanwhile, most of the North has discovered something like a working democracy, for all its faults, and the beginnings of a practical economy. Quite obviously, despite the griping that is endemic among all our local psychologies, that’s the way people like it.

    Look, the Spring has sprung. I’ve got daffodils and birds-nesting in my garden. So be of good cheer.

  • Ahem

    Malcolm, that’s a nice, optimistic take on the present, but it’s just not true, *yet*. Baby Doc resigned because of sleaze, that’s all, nothing more consequential than that. Can you seriously imagine any Sinn Fein minister resigning over ‘mere’ sleaze, let alone anything rather more morally or legally serious? We’ll get to where you want us to be when the same rules apply to Sinn Fein as they do to everyone else – and that’ll only happen when Sinn Fein start behaving like everyone else. I’m not expecting them to become functioning, constitutional democrats any time soon. Nor for them to develop a sense of shame, let alone guilt, let alone action-demonstrated remorse. And as for the permanent personnel overlap between the, *bad* Provo mafioso, and, the ‘good’ elected politicians, do you see that ending any time soon?

  • Jo

    Apologies for any misjudgement, but when I see gloating at the prospect of Paisley’s removal, the destablising of the devolved arrangements and exascerbating tension in nationalism (and republicanism) against a background of heightened dissident republican violence, I think I see a nostalgia for when things were more black and white.

    But hey, my medication doesn’t appear to have dulled my self-awareness to the stage it appears to have reached with others.

  • George

    “this is the DUP responding decisively to the Dromore by election.”

    This can only be the case if it seems as if Paisley Jr is the first victim of a DUP revamp to address issues that are disillusioning voters. It doesn’t so I can’t see how the resignation of Paisley can be seen as a decisive response.

    Certainly this may represent a significant attempt by Robinson to put a stop to the recent problems, further isolate Paisley senior and yes, also make a positive change after Dromore.

    Or it could be seen as events moving ahead of the DUP and Paisley being forced out by the court of public opinion. Of course Robinson and others may be able make some hay here.

    Had the DUP wanted to ensure no one drew Dromore parallels they could have finished Paisley junior’s ministerial career earlier or indeed left it a while. However, to do it now means that it is part of the response to the election.

    Has the election really had that much of an impact? I know among those who are political it might seem like a big deal but has your average man and woman given it a second thought?

    So this may be a decisive response to Dromore and a way to damage Paisley senior. Alternatively it may be another error; the unionist electorate and the DUP itself will be the judges of that.

    These are not mutually exclusive. It could also be an error and a decisive response to Dromore and a way to damage Paisley.

    Robinson should start to worry and he should remember that politically wounded (quite possibly fatally) as Paisley senior is; he might yet with his last act drive the stake into Robinson.

    All this talk about how capable Robinson is. Yet he still warily circles the approaching 82-year-old Paisley with trepidation.

    Robinson has been a main player in the DUP for the guts of 30 years and still he waits. He will pay the price for that I feel.

    He has ambition but no guts.

  • pith

    The Allister/Paisley Jnr/Dromore saga has exposed Robinson as a second-rate strategist. Maybe he is an example of the battle being better than the victory but he seems to have failed to make the transition from running a party of opposition to running a party in power. His mediocre performance as a minister adds to the perception that he is out of his depth.

    He may also suffer from having been papabile for far too long.

    Has anyone mentioned All’s Well That Ends Well yet?

  • overehere

    “me thinks the lady doth protest too much ” Ahem

  • Ahem @ 12:52 PM:

    I sincerely apologise for being optimistic on a fine bright day: I promise to be more bilious in future.

    Your posting is based on a couple of assumptions.

    Both seem based on what you imply is my fault: double standards. Fair enough. The trouble is that I’m trying to work out which NI leader has never been caught on camera holding a gun, has never incited violence, has ever “demonstrated remorse”. Trying to pretend otherwise is double-standards.

    Then we have the monocular vision of “sleaze”. I feel that the whole Paisley/Causeway/Sweeney nexus goes rather beyond that overused term. We are not talking just brown-paper envelopes here: it is political machination and manipulation on an advanced scale. That is why, to take one example, some of us are concerned with the thought-control implicit in the “Young Earth” nonsense.

    As for proper Parliamentary “standards” I draw attention to Alistair Graham’s statement this morning.

  • Paul P

    Pith,

    “His mediocre performance as a minister adds to the perception that he is out of his depth.”

    Even Robinson’s fiercest political opponents concede to his ability as a minister.

  • Ahem

    Malcolm, you’re being over-sensitive – I wasn’t having a go at you, I was of course having a go at the pretendy politicians of what is still overwhelmingly Sinn Fein-IRA. Baby Doc could have sold his mother’s intenral organs on the internet and used the money to buy donkey porn, to sell onto trainee nuns, and it *still* would hardly compare to what the IRA end of Sinn Fein-IRA have got up to. Get het up about Baby Doc of course, but equally, and acting according to precisely the same moral precepts guidng you there, be determined to hold Provo ‘politicians’ to account. The most cheering thing about the getting of Paisley mi is that the moral, political, and one day even legal noose draws slowly but ever tighter round the necks of the killers in office.

  • pith

    Paul P,

    “Even Robinson’s fiercest political opponents concede to his ability as a minister.”

    Have the Paisleys actually conceded that?

  • Jo,

    Pity there’s no medication to cure you of liberal self-righteousness.

  • Jo

    I think its a genetic condition, actually, by way of a counterbalance to that enduring remnant of homo sapiens neanderthalensis – that appears to survive to the present 😉

  • It was Sammy Mc Nally what done it

    Can’t really see why he has gone – lobbying for a constituent is not a hanging (resigning)offence.

    The renting of the flat from his father in law seems a bigger issue – but this affects DaddyDoc as well. DaddyDoc would never have agreed to dispense with Jnr unless it was something more serious than we can see, nor would Jnr agree to go.

    TUV have the DUP by the political balls – Jnr, being on the right of the party would help to fend them off.

    If he has gone for over this well fair play to the DUP for acting on a realtively minor issue –
    FF could well do with adopting the far higher standards that exist North of the border.

  • cut the bull

    I am sure a lot of disgruntled DUPmembers will be singing this song. Especially those forming an orderly que for the abonded junior ministerial post.

    The day Daithí caught you telling lies

    A long, long time ago…
    I can still remember
    How your bullshit used to make me smile.
    And you knew if you had a chance
    That you could lead people on a merry dance
    And, maybe, they’d be happy for a while.

    But Daithí made you shiver
    uncovering every spoof you delivered.
    Bad news on the DUP doorstep;
    You couldn’t take one more step.

    I can’t remember if I cried
    When I read about how you lied,
    But something touched me deep inside
    The day your credibility died.

    So bye-bye, Junior Minister, you can’t stop telling lies.
    you drove Gregory, Peter and Nigel crazy
    cos you were telling lies.
    And them good old boys, screamed its time to say goodbye
    Singin’, “this’ll be the day, you tell your last lie.
    “this’ll be the day that you tell your last lie.”

    Did you ever read the book of love,
    And do you have faith in God above,
    yes the Bible tells you so?
    Do not tell lies NO, No, No,
    Can any body save your mortal soul,
    And can you learn how tell the truth real slow?

    Well, your Da knows we’re not mad at him
    `cause he believes lies are sins.
    But he’s standing in Jepettoes shoes.
    Man, I hope he digs you black and blue.

    You were a lonely teenage broncin’ buck
    you frowned on men with a pink carnation and a pickup truck,
    But closet party members, were happy you were out of luck
    The day Daithí caught you telling lies.

    I started singin’, bye-bye, Junior Minister, you can’t stop telling lies.
    you drove Gregory, Peter and Nigel crazy
    cos you were telling lies.
    And them good old boys, screamed its time to say goodbye
    Singin’, “this’ll be the day, you tell your last lie.
    “this’ll be the day that you tell your last lie.”

    Now for at least ten years you’ll be on our own
    And moss grows fat on a rollin’ stone,
    But that’s not how it used to be.
    You’re a clown jester sang, a shame to our queen,
    In quoting your lies you were obscene
    And a voice that came from you and me,

    Oh, and while Peter was looking down,
    The jester stole his thorny crown.
    The courtroom was adjourned;
    No verdict was returned.
    And while lennon read a book of marx,
    The quartet (Peter, Gregory, Nigel and Jeffrey) practiced in the park,
    And we sang dirges in the dark
    The day Daithí caught you telling lies.

    We were singing,
    bye-bye, Junior Minister, you can’t stop telling lies.
    you drove Gregory, Peter and Nigel crazy
    cos you were telling lies.
    And them good old boys, screamed its time to say goodbye
    Singin’, “this’ll be the day, you tell your last lie.
    “this’ll be the day that you tell your last lie.”

  • cut the bull

    Helter skelter in a summer swelter.
    Your Da should have sent you to a fallout shelter,
    Once high and mighty, now falling fast.
    You’ve landed foul on the grass.
    All the lies you tried to pass,
    you’re the jester kicked out on your ass.

    Now the half-time air was sweet perfume
    While the party played a marching tune.
    We all got up to dance,
    Oh, you not staying as a minister no chance!
    `cause the players tried to take the field;
    The marching band demande that you yield.
    Do you recall what Daithí revealed
    The day he caught you telling lies?

    We started singing,
    bye-bye, Junior Minister, you can’t stop telling lies.
    you drove Gregory, Peter and Nigel crazy
    cos you were telling lies.
    And them good old boys, screamed its time to say goodbye
    Singin’, “this’ll be the day, you tell your last lie.
    “this’ll be the day that you tell your last lie.”

    Oh, and there we were all in one place,
    A generation lost in space
    With no time left to start again.
    So come on: Ian be nimble, Ian be quick!
    Your like Pinnochio, a lying prick
    Cause lies are the devil’s only friend.

    Oh, and as I watched you on the stage
    My hands were clenched in fists of rage.
    No angel born in hell
    Could break that satan’s spell.
    And as the flames climbed high into the night
    To light the lies as you talked shite,
    I saw satan laughing with delight
    The day Daithí caught you telling lies

    He was singing,
    bye-bye, Junior Minister, you can’t stop telling lies.
    you drove Gregory, Peter and Nigel crazy
    cos you were telling lies.
    And them good old boys, screamed its time to say goodbye
    Singin’, “this’ll be the day, you tell your last lie.
    “this’ll be the day that you tell your last lie.”

    All the party sang the blues
    And we prayed for some happy news,
    But luck just smiled and turned away.
    I went down to see your Da
    Where I’d heard about more lies years before,
    We all agreed that you couldn’t stay.

    And in the streets: the Shinners screamed,
    With laughter they cried, was it a dream.
    But not a word was spoken;
    The DUP fundamentalists haerts all were broken.
    And the three men the Shinners admire most:
    The father, son, and the holy ghost,
    They caught the last train for the coast
    The day Daithí caught you telling lies.

    And they were singing, bye-bye, Junior Minister, you can’t stop telling lies.
    you drove Gregory, Peter and Nigel crazy
    cos you were telling lies.
    And them good old boys, screamed its time to say goodbye
    Singin’, “this’ll be the day, you tell your last lie.
    “this’ll be the day that you tell your last lie.”

    They were singing,
    bye-bye, Junior Minister, you can’t stop telling lies.
    you drove Gregory, Peter and Nigel crazy
    cos you were telling lies.
    And them good old boys, screamed its time to say goodbye
    Singin’, “this’ll be the day, you tell your last lie.
    “this’ll be the day that you tell your last lie.”

  • mags

    Morrow isn’t remotely a credible candidate. Re the rest – the Punt’s influence is high but remember that Paisley has sole nomination rights and the choice likely to reflect his and jnr’s views not the Punt’s.

  • darth rumsfeld

    All I used to remember about Hamlet was a poor joke when he meets his sister and says “I didn’t know whether to shake your hand Ophelia” (say it out loud), so I naturally dashed to the Rumsfled library for the play, and found..

    “Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
    the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune
    or take up arms against a sea of troubles
    and by opposing end them”

    then in an early folio-
    “Dromore’s the thing
    wherein I’ll catch the conscience of the king”

    and the son’s bitter assessment of the dad-
    “Oh what a noble mind is here o’erthrown”

    “A certain convocation of politic worms are e’en at him” – clearly a reference to Lisbon

    and that planning application “scandal”-
    “When sorrows come, they come not single spies,
    but in battalions”

  • Blooper

    Jim Allister and the TUV would hate to see Paisley Snr. go – hence Allister’s protestations that its about “policy” not persobnalities – could have fooled me with the stuff he’s been spouting for the last 6 months.

    Truth is that DUP supporters have been hacked off at the chuckling imagery and the whiff of sleeze aroung Junior – remove those issues and Allister has very little to go on.

    These two things need to be accompanied by a re-shuffling of the deck in terms of media profile of the DUP.

    Someone who voted for Harbinson and who previously was a UUP voter who moved with Jeffrey Donaldson told me the reason he voted for Harbinson was not to tear down Stormont but to send a message to the DUP to pull up their socks and knock the chuckling on the head.

  • Ahem @ 01:46 PM

    Malcolm, you’re being over-sensitive
    Aw, how touching. However as the Wabbit would say of Elmer Fudd: “Eeeeerh, ‘e don’t know me vewy well.”

    it *still* would hardly compare to what the IRA end of Sinn Fein-IRA have got up to.
    Quite possibly, but more monocular vision.

    I trust I am not alone is agreeing with the Economist, a fortnight ago, on the “victims unit” and the botched appointments of the commissioners:

    Sectarian sympathies still hold back attempts to move on

    HEALING the wounds incurred during Northern Ireland’s “Troubles” was bound to be slow, but the latest attempt to do so may actually have set things back a bit…

    … Unionists argue that relatives of paramilitaries should not be equated with those of their victims. Republicans, who identify more closely with the hard men of their movement, like to blur the distinction.

    It is becoming clear that many murders from the time of the Troubles will never be prosecuted, so fine words and a little money may be the closest thing to justice that many victims and their families receive.

    My real sickener? Last year I heard a UDA sympathiser/DUP voter/Free Presbyterian worshipper claim that, on a man-per-kill basis, the Prod paramilitaries had been at least as productive as PIRA.

    Why can it not be generally accepted that PIRA (with some help from the other side) achieved the ultimate self-negating Pyrrhic victory: the creation of the world’s first (and still most efficient) surveillance society? And then had to move on?

    There are many joys in living in the past, but the point of view Ahem @ 01:46 PM represents is:

    … weary, stale, flat and unprofitable.

    Hamlet, I.ii.133

    Better to go with young Omelette again:

    Sure, he that made us with such large discourse,
    Looking before and after, gave us not
    That capability and god-like reason
    To fust in us unused.

    Ibid, IV.i.36-8

  • Ahem

    Malcolm’s astonishingly orgiinal, free thinking and radical stance:

    it *still* would hardly compare to what the IRA end of Sinn Fein-IRA have got up to.
    Quite possibly, but more monocular vision.

    Er, no, wait, that’s just the usual old Nationalist mantra. Because of course, as Malcolm knows full well, it’s precisely because it’s not at all possible that Junior’s ‘crimes’ are comparable to, oh, Marty’s that we know which one of us has monocular vision, and which one of us can see two things, compare them, then make a moral distinction. If you want to insist that Junior’s sleaze in any way equates to Martin’s murdering, go right ahead, though I begin to see why you’re quite so touchy.

  • martin

    I wonder Papa Doc has an undated resignation letter from Robo in his top drawer. Would be a bold act to sideline Robo for a few years !

  • ahmet