Why Shankill ‘walk of shame’ won’t be the last one…

THE detection skills of the PSNI know no bounds, with an early assessment – a mere two weeks after the event – that paramilitaries may have been behind the Shankill ‘walk of shame’. This might sound like the cops are stating the bleeding obvious, but it’s a major advance from what the Secretary of State (left) said on Wednesday, when he told Nigel Dodds that “the possibility of paramilitary involvement is still being considered”. Now we already know the NIO’s job is shielding terrorists from the law, but what are the police seriously going to do about a couple of possible hoods being told to admit their alleged crimes in public? How long do we have to wait before the PSNI press office issues its ‘No complaint has been received about this incident’ statement?

  • BG, perhaps you should have noted that we probably still have ‘political policing’ ie the NIO, assisted by Dublin, limits the actions of police officers.

  • heck

    BG

    these are loyalist patamilitaries. Surely you don’t expect the PSNI/UVF to take action against them.

    Does the name haddock mean anything?

  • joeCanuck

    He did point that out, Nevin.

    we already know the NIO’s job is shielding terrorists from the law

  • I was just adding the third side of the triangle, Joe – and noting the Dublin dimension!! Presumably the CPS is also so ‘restrained’ 😉

  • or PPS

  • joeCanuck

    Ok Nevin. Understood.

  • lib2016

    These guys weren’t even illegal until a decade and a half ago, and as we see in the education debate, the unionist middle class don’t give two balls of glue what happens on the Shankill. The loyalist population has been abandoned by those who should have been their leaders.

    This is about reaping what you sowed. Not about blaming a police service which is trying to rehabilitate itself after years of being used as the armed wing of a political party.

  • “as we see in the education debate, the unionist middle class don’t give two balls of glue what happens on the Shankill.”

    That’s crap. The reason for opposing Ruane’s reforms is because they will replace selection by merit with selection by wealth. Socialism my arse.

    “a police service which is trying to rehabilitate itself after years of being used as the armed wing of a political party.”

    Eugh. Change the record.

  • BG, Minister Goggins is Minister of State, not SoS.

  • K man

    Political idealism and the usual slugger rants aside, theres a bigger picture here.

    Who actually is bothered by the local community saying “enough is enough” and parading two thieving scum bags in public?

  • lib2016

    K man,

    The problem with vigilante justice is that it inevitably becomes mob justice with the mob being led by it’s own worst elements. The countless number of houses burned out on council estates with totally innocent families left homeless because one of the household is deemed, rightly or wrongly, to have upset the local gang leaders is proof of that.

    This version of ‘justice’ comes straight from our prisons with one thug looking down on another thug to justify their own amorality. No, I don’t want a convicted sex-criminal living next to me but I object to a convicted extortionist or other gangster taking to himself the right to judge either of us. Next he’ll be coming for me because I haven’t subscribed for the vigilante Christmas fund. That’s why so many of us object to the ‘walk of shame’, not because we’re noble but because we know the type of people behind it.

  • “That’s why so many of us object to the ‘walk of shame’, not because we’re noble but because we know the type of people behind it.”

    Why don’t these objections always register in the alleged privacy of the ballot box? It seems the ‘vote of shame’ can be worn as a badge of honour.

  • lib2016

    Nevin,

    I assume that you are accusing nationalists of voting for violence, something I reject since its only since the ceasefire that Sinn Fein support has grown. I can only speak for myself, until the ceasefires and for some years after I voted SDLP. Some years later I saw that the SDLP leadership were growing older and no longer had a radical tinge to their politics. I had met a few active Sinn Fein members over the years and been impressed by their idealism and capability and the fact that they were quite ready to discuss the past, their part in it, and the need to move on from the physical force tradition and embrace real politics.

    The hardmen were either changing or getting squeezed out, though I don’t deny that they are still a problem in some areas, just as there are still quite a few policemen I wouldn’t like to meet on a dark night. By that time the GFA had been signed and unionist resistance to its implementation had become clear.

    Sometime around the turn of the century I realised that we were in for a long peace and that Sinn Fein were going to be the leading nationalist party for the foreseeable future.

    I was always aware, of course, that Sinn Fein had opposed vigilantes, contrary to British propaganda, though republican activists had certainly been involved in vigilante behaviour then as now. Now, with Sinn Fein backing the PSNI I consider that I have been proved right and that the process of changing the republican movement is still ongoing. Centuries of oppression won’t disappear overnight and nationalist areas have the same problems as urban areas anywhere. Hopefully nationalists and loyalists together will be greater than the sum of their parts.

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