DPP requests Special Criminal Court for Murphy tax evasion charges

As Mick noted at the time on Comment is Free, Thomas Murphy has previously been named as both the UK’s richest smuggler and a former Provisional IRA Chief of Staff – a claim which led to a failed libel action by Murphy against the Sunday Times in 1998, during which case Eamon Collins testified against him. At the beginning of 1999 Eamon Collins was murdered in South Armagh. Alongside, apparently, ongoing investigations, Murphy was arrested in November this year on 9 charges of failing to file tax returns and, after an additional week’s delay, RTÉ reports today that a four-volume book of evidence was served on the defendant in Dundalk District Court.. together with a DPP request for the case to be heard in the non-jury Special Criminal Court – “Judge Brennan agreed to adjourn the case to 10 January in Dundalk to allow the defendant consider the book of evidence and the DPPs certificate.” [But is he still “a good republican”? – Ed] More Below the foldAdds From today’s Irish Times [subs req]

The certificate from the DPP which directed that he be returned to the Special Criminal Court stated that it was because, in the DPP’s opinion, the ordinary courts were inadequate to secure the proper administration of justice and the preservation of public peace and order in relation to the trial of Mr Murphy.

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  • ohyeahyeah

    slab took it down from the mast. the volunteers who carried out the operation against the ruc/psni man who tried to use children as human shields near a college in derry are good republicans. long may they roll!!

  • DC

    ‘A good republican’ is what is good in Gerry Adams’ mind, to the rest of us he’s a right bastard.

  • Slugger O’Toole Admin

    Try to keep to the ball. And keep it civil.

  • Good Grief

    re: post 1 > ohyawnyawn more like

  • Irish Republican In America

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/3715205.stm

    This list of rich “underwold” people is hilarious. “London Playboy”, “Unnamed Drug Baron”!

  • parci

    Ireland’s Al Capone.
    What’s he likely to get if convicted?
    Prison? Fine? ASBO?

  • dewi

    Whatever peoples views Mr Murphy an astonishly capable bloke. In a normal world he would be running Irish railways.

  • Mick Hall

    Think what you will about Tom Murphy, he is one of the more interesting characters to come out of the long war. What one would not give to interview Tom and live to tell the tale.

    What makes me chuckle about Murphy is he looks what he is, an old bachelor from down on the border, but behind that blank look there is a great deal going on. Whilst one does not have to be intelligent to survive in his kind of business, you have to be pretty sharp and have about you a great deal more than crass brutality as some of Murphy’s enemies claim. For brutality alone would not account for the loyalty this man adheres from others, for if it was violence alone someone would have given him up decades ago.

    What strikes me about the man is that he is absolutely comfortable in his own shoes and there is nothing he needs that he has not already got, thus he makes such a dangerous foe. They will probably be singing songs about Tom Murphy long after we are all gone.

  • confused

    Mick Hall your a sad man.Slab murphy is just a crook a thief a very brutal one twenty men beating one boy to death whose going to give him up they all go down togeather then dont act soft or foolish there are no more songs its over.

  • New Yorker

    Mick Hall

    Your praise of this man is ill founded. First, there are the victims, such as Eamon Collins, whose families would not agree with your paean to the old bachelor. Second, there is the lawlessness unleashed on the local community and well beyond. Third, there is the pernicious and damaging influence on the political process.

    These days I wonder how comfortable he is and how certain he is of the loyalty of all in his circle.

  • Mark McGregor

    “”the ordinary courts are inadequate to secure the effective administration of justice”

    Why?

    Or is the OSA just being used by the DPP as a more likely method of returning a conviction?

    Its a tax case, hardly likely to need witness testimony.

  • steve

    Confused
    Nice to see every one is all convicted in your narrow wee mind

    And astonishingly with out a stick of real evidence

  • Confused

    Poor wee steve there is really nothing i can say to you except that yous are a beaten docket but oh the heartache and harm that will be done before they all go away.

  • Turgon

    This episode raises a couple of issues to my mind. Firstly I agree with steve (amazingly). The fact is that this individual is innocent until proven guilty. The fact is that the RoI is a democracy under the rule of law (whatever my criticisms of it) and the fact that there will be a trial shows that there is a legitimate government of the 26 counties of the Republic of Ireland and that legitimate government is not the army council of the IRA. The army council would not extend such things as a fair trial to the accused. That is just one of the raesons why we the decent people of the whole of Ireland are in the right and the IRA members are in the wrong.

    Turning to Mick Hall’s post. If Thomas Murphy is the chief of staff or former chief of staff of the IRA it initially appears interesting and ironic that he looks like a country farmer. Apart form being from South Armagh rather than South Fermanagh he could pass for any one of a number of my wife’s relatives living or dead.

    Of course the fact is that often apparent “criminal masterminds” are actually rather tediously normal people. They often lack great intelligence, good looks, even that much charisma. I know it invokes Godwin’s law but most of the Nazis were actually pretty tedious, uncultured and unremarkable people who were not noted for great intelligence. I am sure Mick Hall will concur that Trotsky was much more talented than Stalin yet Stalin won. Stalin was a pretty tedious and not especially cultured nor clever man.

    The fact is that utter ruthlessness, being in the right place at the right time and good fortune can make pretty limited people achieve by the standards of criminality if they are willing to be unpleasant enough.

    Yes if Mr. Murphy is the former or current chief of staff of the IRA he could tell many stories, They would probably be along the lines of “I shot him or her”, “I ordered him or her to kill him or her or to bomb that”, or “I told them to learn how to make a better mortar” etc., etc. Yes it might have a certain voyeuristic appeal but the most important thing would be that it would be the record of the needless and evil ending of people’s lives; people who by their living would have enriched their friends, families and indeed all our lives here in Northern Ireland just as their deaths have dimished them. People for whom (just like Mr. Murphy) Christ scorned not to die.

  • Mick Hall

    New Yorker

    What praise would that be, what paean? I never expressed my own opinion about Tom Murphy beyond saying he is one of the more interesting characters to come out of the long war, and only a fool would doubt this fact.

    Lets look at the points I made again,

    Do you really believe people in the future will not be singing songs about Tom Murphy and his ilk, if you do you have little understanding about the Irish who have a history of singing about gallant defeats/victories that often have very little connection with actual events, as we all do..

    Do you really believe people who exist in a violent environment for decades do so by brute force alone, if you do you obviously have had no experience of such men, whether they be gangsters or freedom fighters.

    Do you beleive Tom Murphy is not comfortable and more in his own shoes? if so by all means argue against the points I make, the fact you did not tells me all and I think you owe me an apology, as you have no idea what I think about Tom Murphy, you simply put your own prejudices on to me.

    confused,
    I despair sometimes as you clearly did not understand a word I wrote.

  • Mick Hall

    turgon

    You are correct in that great intelligence is not a necessity of people like Stalin etc, but in my experience these individuals who have power over other men/women often have a sharp mind not a great intellect, a mind that works quickly, they are often crafty and can read people extremely well. Most are not personally brutal although they are quite capable of being so. The reason for this is they can get other more gullible people to carry out violent acts on their behalf.

    Whilst Trotsky was a great intellectual and was not personally brutal, I do not go along with his or his heirs assessment of Stalin that he was a dullard, Stalin was I suspect like Mr Murphy a very able leader of men, something Leon Trotsky, for all his great abilities was not so good at.

    The measure of a great leader is to be one of the men but not of them if you get my drift and if like Trotsky you are head and shoulders intellectually above your peers, you are liable to create jealousy not loyalty.

    The problem with the way the media deals with such people is they almost always portray them as ranting monsters which is silly, I was listening to a secret recording of Hitler the other day and the man was charm itself, I feel the media portray them as ranting monsters because they cannot come to terms with these monsters not be that different from the rest of us in the way they intereact.

  • Dread Cthulhu

    Mick Hall: “Think what you will about Tom Murphy, he is one of the more interesting characters to come out of the long war. What one would not give to interview Tom and live to tell the tale. ”

    Yeah… great… interesting alleged smuggling murdering thugs. Bravo.

    Mick Hall: “Whilst one does not have to be intelligent to survive in his kind of business, you have to be pretty sharp and have about you a great deal more than crass brutality as some of Murphy’s enemies claim.”

    Not really — Al Capone, Bugsy Siegel, Arthur Fleggenheimer, James “Whitey” Bulger… crass brutality goes a hell of a long way in the underworld.

  • Mick

    “these individuals who have power over other men/women often have a sharp mind not a great intellect, a mind that works quickly, they are often crafty and can read people extremely well. Most are not personally brutal although they are quite capable of being so. The reason for this is they can get other more gullible people to carry out violent acts on their behalf.”

    Those are the key lines of yours to focus on.

    Rather than any historical comparisons.. or, indeed, how the media may portray such individuals.

  • Turgon

    Mick Hall,
    Actually I agree entirely with that post. Often I think people want to believe that those whom they perceive as “evil” are different or “other” than them. A good example I noticed in a tabloid a few days ago was that apparently Rosemary West had a pet rodent and she was very sad when it died. This was seen as surprising. The reality is that lots of people who do utterly wicked things are very ordinary and are capable of doing nice things. Indeed I would submit we all have the capacity to do very evil things. There is of course a religious argument here but even leaving aside religion; normally good people can do utterly wicked things as one offs and indeed can become corrupted into multiple horrible acts. I would argue that it shows the Utter Depravity of the human soul but also the fact that no one is beyond the reach of Irrestible Grace. (Sorry calvinist aside).

    I suspect you are right and in a few generations some people from your tradition may laud Thomas Murphy as an IRA leader (whatever the truth or not of it) and some from mine may laud Lenny Murphy. It is, however, rather sad in my view. I would rather they did not but there seems to be a tradition of it here.

  • DC

    Mick Hall,

    Sorry, really I am but I am not about to lie down in the face of a bent, murdering, malicious men. Ripe out the content of this if you want but National Socialists come gansters don’t fool me.

    And I am sorry for the offence, if caused, really I am.

    But, efforts by the strong to dominate the weak will end. Okay.

  • DC

    Apologies for the above Pete, Mick and Mick Hall but you should know better and perhaps I should drink less during the week.

    [Done – edited moderator]

  • The Dubliner

    “The reality is that lots of people who do utterly wicked things are very ordinary and are capable of doing nice things.”

    Actually, the reality is that they are profoundly abnormal – and should never be confused with normal people. Antisocial personality disorder (“A pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others.” – American Psychiatric Association) affects about 3% of males and 1% of females, so they are common enough in society to form groups that are destructive to society while being advantageous to themselves (organised crime syndicates, murder gangs, fascist movements, etc). A sociopath is devoid of conscience and devoid of empathy. Because they lack the emotions to relate to others (who are no more than cardboard cut-outs to them), they have to labour hard at such interaction in order to be seen as normal. That is why they often appear charming: they’re mastered the art of people management through necessity. Central to that is the need to manipulate through deceit or intimidation. As Mick said, they’re expert people-readers. Someone like Murphy would be either a sociopath or a psychopath with the main difference being that the sociopath is a product of his experience and the psychopath is born that way. APD disorder is the cause of all the trouble in society (one study puts the percentage of prisoners who meet the diagnostic requirement for APD at between 80 to 85 percent).

  • New Yorker

    Mick Hall

    What I object to is contributing to the myth making you forecast regarding this individual. You can have your private opinions about such people, but on the public record making them sound like a cuddly old uncle is wrong. If you spoke of spikes through heads, torture chambers, mangled bones and the like you would be contributing to a more truthful myth than the fairy tale of the old bachelor farmer who smuggled a few litres of petrol in his old banger of a car. Modern myths are not spontaneous creations. In this case Jack The Ripper is more on the mark than a teddy bear with a cap.

    In the midst of the Garda squeezing, I doubt he’s very comfortable. It just takes one to feel the heat and squeal and the whole house collapses. And it’s not as easy to hop a jet to Bulgaria when on bail.

  • Steve

    But, efforts by the strong to dominate the weak will end. Okay.

    Sorry DC but the strong always dominate the weak, they do it with out effort or even understanding. perhaps the biggest difference between Stalin and Hitler was the ability to turn it on and off as the situation required. and the ability to do it with subtle dominance that is so under the radar that not a blip is ever raised.

    As a manager I expierement with the subtle interplay among my employees. I totally lack the charm of a true hitler but I have learned to turn the domination on and off as required, though I dont always get it right.

  • lib2016

    A bunch of religious nutters from a couple of provincial counties on a remote off-shore island manage to drag out the British withdrawal from that island by inflicting 80 years of oppression and Emergency Laws and we have this nonsense about the powers of Good and Evil and popular psychology straight out of the pages of Readers Digest.

    The unionists got away with it for so long because they were useful to the British Conservative Party. It had nothing to do with their vicious hypocrisy or their gift for playing the Pharisee.

    As for South Armagh? Like every large council estate or other semi-independent area there are local hardmen. South Armagh has never had good government nor acceptable policing so the figures there are more powerful and have more popular support but in essence it’s still the same, and if you’re a democratic like me you believe that local people will sort it out if they are given the chance.

    Since the Harvard experiments we all know what we’re capable of. Special Branch jumping on the legs of children until they snapped like twigs were’t monsters unfortunately and the guys from South Armagh I went to school with are probably no less and no more capable of violence than they were.

  • lib2016

    The point is that no-one should be above the law and the closer we get to that ideal the better.

  • Lurker

    the brilliant primetime investigation into oil smuggling on Monday seems to have had its effect.
    Showing that oil smugglers could be tailed and nailed and challenging the police to do the same, arrests followed within 24 hours. Brilliant!
    And showing that hoodlums like Hoey and Hanratty had been getting light sentences from local courts, it has perhaps forced the decision to take Slab to Dublin.
    And the man is an anomaly. Probably he is ‘comfortable in his own shoes’. He has a confident world view which justifies what he does. Preserving that, I suspect, requires a limited imagination.
    Maybe a long spell in jail will prise open that imagination, as it has doen for so many others.

  • Mick Hall

    Some good posts here,
    just to clarify my point about ‘old bachelor’ etc, i made that point in the hope readers might understand that one takes a person on their looks at ones peril.

    DC
    Fair enough.

    Dread
    You really are getting your opinion of people like Al Capone, Bugsy Siegel, Arthur Fleggenheimer, James “Whitey” Bulger from the media.”

    Take the recent portrayal of Bulger in a Movie, it was so far off the mark it was ridiculous. Mind you it has done the crook a great favor for if anyone were to run into him they would not be able to recognize the guy from the movie. Are these people violent yes, but like the rest of us they have a depth of character beyond that fact.

    Turgon explains this better than I.

  • steve

    A long stretch in gaol for tax evasion?

    What did those 2 brothers with the hotels get?

    If slab gets anymore then he isnt getting justice he is getting punished beyond whats normal for crimes he has never been convicted of

  • Joey

    It’s actually nonsense to dismiss Nazism as enforced by normal, ‘common’ or average people. What distinguished it, i.e. allowed the juggournaught to move so far through Germany and beyond into Europe was that its adovocates were precisely drawn from the more able sections of German society. This was often not from the elites, but the often poorer, dynamic deizens of Germany who were frustrated by what they considered their land had given them. Thus much has been written about the masters of the concentration camps blasting Wagner out over the killing zones and being, on the whole, very well-educated and innovative people. Unforunately.

    Turgon should think how it sounds: if only Nazism and the wretched ‘Slab’ – idiotically seen as ‘fascinating’ by someone on this thread – were ordinary/easy to get rid of. If only. These people cannot inflict misery on the scale they do to so many people if they are simple, normal beings. It is this exact misunderestimation – witness Stalin – that accounts for their nasty triumph.

  • Dread Cthulhu

    Mick Hall: “You really are getting your opinion of people like Al Capone, Bugsy Siegel, Arthur Fleggenheimer, James “Whitey” Bulger from the media.” ”

    Yeah, gee, Mick… given my interest in history, I couldn’t possibly have done *ANY* research into Prohibition and the fall of the Irish mob, beyond watching a few old Edward G. Robinson and James Cagney movies…

    Johnny Torio, Capone’s boss and mentor, freely acknowledged that Al was a violent man with what we call in the gentler twenty-first century, “impulse control problems.” Similarly, Benjamin ‘Bugsy’ Siegel, occasionally charming, was better known for his outbursts of nigh-psychotic rage, hence the nickname. Fleggenheimer, better known as “Dutch Schultz,” was so fond of solving his problems with a gun that his compatriots in the underworld felt it necessary to eliminate him to prevent him from
    “rubbing out” Special Prosecutor Thomas Dewey and was known to once walk into a police station, offering a new house to the cop that killed “the Mick” aka ‘Mad Dog’ Coll, another hood for the wall of shame, best remembered for machine-gunning a few kids in the effort to eliminate a mobster known for his generousity to children. As for Whitey, thirty some odd personal murders — some business, some not, along with a collection of rapes, drug-dealing and assorted mayhem, not to mention the which he ordered, amount to the fact that he was a violent hood who got where he was and stayed there by willing to stab backs and cut throats. Although, I will grant, Whitey’s ability to play all sides off against each other gives you half a point on this one, but only half.

    The sharp guys — the guys who really truly on the ball, were guys like Owney Madden and Roger “Terrible” Touhy — names that never reach the ear of the casual student of crime — are the one’s with some real depth.

    Mick Hall: “Take the recent portrayal of Bulger in a Movie, it was so far off the mark it was ridiculous.”

    That’s because it wasn’t a portrayal of Bulger. The shape of the role was partly inspired by Bulger, but the plot was Hong Kong cinema and “portrayal” was almost pure Jack Nicholson ad-lib.

    Mick Hall: “Mind you it has done the crook a great favor for if anyone were to run into him they would not be able to recognize the guy from the movie.”

    Not really, partly given the above (i.e. the movie wasn’t a bio-pic) and partly given the dynamic that no publicity is good publicity, at least when you’re a crook. Hey, one of the confirmed sightings of Whitey arose because someone saw a wanted poster of him posted as a background prop in one of the “Hannibal Lecter” movies.

    Mick Hall: “Are these people violent yes, but like the rest of us they have a depth of character beyond that fact. ”

    I would argue that they are primarily violent individuals. The folks who weren’t violent, or preferred brains to thuggery — Torio, Madden, Frank Costello (ironic, given the movie) — were pushed to the side by the megomanical thugs.

  • Mick Hall

    Dread

    No one on this thread has denied the people we are discussing can be extremely violent, that is a major part of their trade after all. I myself made that point specifically in a post. What I and others have said is that it is not all they are about and it is for other reasons beyond the violence alone what helped them rise to the top of their ‘professions’.

    Leave those who work out side the law and have a look at people who are given a license by society to be violent. Generals for example, you would not consider that they were violent psychopaths who only got to the top of their profession due to their brutality, yet violence is the main element of their work.

    Why should it be different for those that operated beyond the law? After all much the same abilities are needed in both groups, although I doubt you and others on here would agree.

    Of course people like Torio, Madden, Frank Costello would never have got to the top of their profession if they were not brutal thugs and for you to suggest they weren’t makes me feel this is not your best subject.

    You seem to believe believe there is a difference between Frank Costello ordering an underling to beat someone to death with a baseball bat and say Al Capone who supposedly actually did the dirty deed himself, I do not.

    That fact is these three in the long run lacked the leadership qualities to keep their ‘soldiers’ [for want of a better word] on side, it had little to do with their business acumen.

    I fear we are going to have to differ on this, all the best.

  • Dread Cthulhu

    Mick Hall: “What I and others have said is that it is not all they are about and it is for other reasons beyond the violence alone what helped them rise to the top of their ‘professions’. ”

    I would tend to disagree, given that more restrained individuals, such as Madden, were able to reach equal pinnacles and that, without their propensity for violence, most of the individuals in question — Capone, Fleggenheimer, etc., would have been little more than street hoods. Capone, for example, was brought in from New York by Torio to act as his bodyguard and hatchet man and, it is theorized, to eliminate Torio’s uncle, ‘Big Jim” Colisimo. He did not build the rackets he inherited from Torio, who “retired” after coming very close to death in a hit made by the North Side O’Bannions in retaliation for the death of Dion O’Bannion. His expansion was through the violent elimination of rivals, including the Sicilian Genna brothers and both O’Bannion organizations. There may have been a superficial charm, but it was mostly a facade. Capone was a shark — good at violence, but there was no real there there. Add a little narcissim and a dash of psychosis and meglomania, but that is about it.

    Without Torio’s beneficience, Capone would have been just another unemployed syphilitic thug.

    Mick Hall: “Of course people like Torio, Madden, Frank Costello would never have got to the top of their profession if they were not brutal thugs and for you to suggest they weren’t makes me feel this is not your best subject. ”

    Ah, but there is an order of magnitude (at least) between Torio and Capone or Costello and Siegel. Well, that and the lack of mental deficiency.

    Like Capone, Costello inherited his position, in Costello’s case, from Luciano. Costello, however, was not interested in being the biggest boss, but in keeping the peace and achieving semi-respectability. Yes, he “made his bones,” but there is no record of him personally participating in the beating death on underlings, as did Capone to two of his previously favored underlings, suggesting at least a rudimentary realization of the downside of “the Chicago way.” He became involved in charity events and society, right up to his Icarian fall with the Keflauver hearings.

    Likewise Madden is more interesting not because of his violent salad-days with the Gophers, a NYC street gang, but for the fact that, like Henry Morgan a couple centuries before, he got to semi-retire and enjoy his ill-gotten gains and the evolution from street-hood to labor-slugger to hi-jacker to one of the bosses of the Combine to semi-respectable retiree in Hot Springs, Arkansas, all while staying under the radar, unlike, say, Capone. Of the Combine, there is no one more interesting than Madden — the man behind the man, save, perhaps, Joe Kennedy, who became the ultimate man behind the man, despite *his* involvement in the Combine.

    There is no equivalent evolution in Capone or Bulger or, arguably, Murphy — just a lust for power and seemingly blood.

    Mick Hall: “You seem to believe believe there is a difference between Frank Costello ordering an underling to beat someone to death with a baseball bat and say Al Capone who supposedly actually did the dirty deed himself, I do not.”

    In that sense you’re wrong — I don’t believe there is any difference on that front. The difference lies in what they did when the attained power — Costello sought to restrain the violence of the Mob, cognizant of the perils. Capone, if he was still alive by this late date, was barely cognizant of anything, his brain having been eaten away by tertiary syphilis. Capone did not have the brains to realize the dangers of the lime-light and the self-defeating nature of the violence he employed, even when he had his full, albeit limited, faculties.

  • Rory (South Derry)

    Now have you all finished spouting off at the mouth or do we have to listen to more drivel!

    The little FANTASY WORLD that is the Peace Process via the GFA was only made possible because the Slab rubber stamped it!

    The Volunteers on the Ground were convinced by The Slab and The Slab only!

    So whatever else he has done – SO What isn’t every other member of PSF/PIRA a gangster as well?

    Get off the soap box muppets!

  • Reader

    Rory SD: The Volunteers on the Ground were convinced by The Slab and The Slab only!
    What’s your point? Even if there was an amnesty in the GFA (and there wasn’t), there wouldn’t have been ongoing immunity. And if there had been ongoing immunity, I wouldn’t have voted for the GFA (which I did). And if Slab is who and what you say he is, then what he actually convinced the volunteers to do was to ‘cease all other activities’. Unless that statement was a lie. Do you think it was?

  • Dread Cthulhu

    Rory (SD): “Now have you all finished spouting off at the mouth or do we have to listen to more drivel! ”

    You don’t have to anything, Rory.

    Rory(SD): “The little FANTASY WORLD that is the Peace Process via the GFA was only made possible because the Slab rubber stamped it! The Volunteers on the Ground were convinced by The Slab and The Slab only! ”

    Unless Slab was promised that he could continue to run his little illegal empire unimpeded (and, frankly, if he was, I hope he got it in writing…), then that might have been a wee bit short-sighted of him.

    Now, take your chorus of “Slab Uber Alles” and goose-step off, Rory.

  • The Dubliner

    Rory, are you praising Mr Murphy for supporting a process that you consider to be a sell-out? If the process is a little fantasy world, then why are you praising him for supporting it? At least be consistent.

    In fact, all PIRA did was agree to stop killing members of Her Majesty’s security and armed forces in return for the privilege of serving in Her Majesty’s government. Murderers don’t deserve the public’s praise for desisting from the dismal practice of murder – even if they have murdered 38 Catholics and 2 protestants since desisting from the murders of said security and armed forces.

  • Mick Hall

    Dread,

    Interesting post, I do not think we are that far apart as I agree with your point made here. “a superficial charm, but it was mostly a facade”

    Rory

    Leaving aside the old bollox you raise an interesting point, as you probably know it have been common gossip for some time within some republican circles that slug and others may well end up on jail. Now as you have pointed out with out Murphy and one or two others the so called peace process would never have been a runner. So one would have thought the British State would have continued to treat Murphy with kid gloves, which in the last few years seems to have been what they have been doing.

    So the question is why now! what has changed to make this ton of bricks fall on his head. Is it that he has out lived his usefulness what with SF acceptance of policing etc; and as with many who believe there are teflon men he has got above himself. I have my own opinions on this but I am more interested in hearing from other sluggerites.