Getting into the Sam Maguire!!

Niall in the SamGreat photograph that captures one of the reasons for the GAA’s success amongst the communities that play it – it remains close to the amateurs on the ground. For all the glamour of the All Ireland Championship, the Sam Maguire Cup has been hosted in gardens and pubs the length and breadth of the island.

  • Garibaldy

    Mick,

    I see your point on this. Equally, one could interpret it as the fact that Ireland, and especially the 26 counties, remains a gombeen society, where if you know the right person you can get access to a national treasure and mistreat it.

  • jerryp

    Garibaldy,
    Would you prefer if people were made pay,say, €10 just to have their photo taken with it and alongside a player who kisses the team crest everytime he scores,swears undying loyalty to the side and is transferred to some other side as soon as a more lucrative offer is made ? Knowing the right person doesn’t come into it.For instance,last week, the Cork county GAA board announced details of 4 training sessions for the Cork Hurlers ( in All-Ireland final on Sept.3rd ) which are open to the public.This is a great opportunity for kids to come along and mix with their heroes ( all amateur ).The players usually spend a long time after the training sessions signing autographs and having photo’s taken.Perhaps the concept of a community-based,amateur sport is something beyond the comprehension of some.

  • samuel mcguire

    Up the Dubs!

  • jaun

    “comunities”…….odd place for a plural there….

  • Chris Donnelly

    Good point Mick.

    I still have vivid recollections of the time Barry Breen brought the Sam Maguire into my school for us pupils to see up close after Down’s initial triumph in the early 90s.

    I’m hoping that I’ll live to see the day an Antrim player can have the pleasure of bringing this esteemed trophy around the county….

  • Garibaldy

    Jerry,

    It is very often about the person you know. For example how did it come about that the captain of the All-Ireland winning team brought Sam Maguire to Joe Cahill on his deathbed? Does this happen for everyone?

    In case you didn’t notice, I didn’t criticise the concept of amateur sports or the GAA. What I did suggest was that the corrupt culture that permeates Irish society also extends to the GAA. There are certainly positive aspects to the Sam Maguire turning up in people’s back gardens but let’s not pretend there are no negatives. We saw an instance of unaccountability recently that damaged the GAA.

  • Concerned Loyalist

    Another child brought up to love, honour and cherish republican murderers and hate the “godless”, “Nazi” Protestant community. Sad but true…

  • Garibaldy

    CL,

    Wasn’t Sam Maguire a Protestant?

  • overhere

    Dear Lord

    There is no pleasing some people:
    Garibaldy: if you want to see corruption just take a look at South Africa or perhaps read your bible and note the passage about moats and beams

    “Corncerned Loyalist” See above

  • Garibaldy

    I’m well aware that the ANC has sold its people down the river, and disgraced itself and those who gave their lives to see all people treated equally.

    I’m also well aware that Irish society, especially in the south, is riddled with corruption at every level from the petty to the major. At near-Italian levels. What’s worse is that there is a culture of acceptance, nodding and winking and the loveable rogue. Fuck the loveable rogue.

  • jerryp

    I wouldn’t defend bringing cup to the deathbed of a Provo murderer,but the point I am making is that the chance to have your photo taken with the trophy is one that is given to just about every school student and every club member in the winning county.For instance,there are a hell of a lot more Gardaí in the GAA than there are Provo.’s ,yet the stupidity of some is used to blacken the entire association.
    Again,knowing the right person doesn’t come into it.The GAA is far from perfect (name one organisation that is) but it has a hugely positive influence on society,especially because of it’s community basis and it’s amateur ethos.

  • chew

    I’m well aware that the ANC has sold its people down the river, and disgraced itself and those who gave their lives to see all people treated equally.

    I’m also well aware that Irish society, especially in the south, is riddled with corruption at every level from the petty to the major. At near-Italian levels. What’s worse is that there is a culture of acceptance, nodding and winking and the loveable rogue. Fuck the loveable rogue.

    in the south ?? do u mean the south of the Island or what ? tis good u refer to the ANC then again ur from a society which would have more in common with south africa in the past like them idiots u will lose ur grip with time

    Dubs for Sam

  • Garibaldy

    I meant the free state, as is perfectly clear.
    I’m unclear if the word “like” should be between idiots and u in your post, suggesting that I am an equivalent of an Afrikaaner. Can you clarify that for me?

  • Mick Fealty

    Can I just say that St Pauls (Holywood/Bangor) are playing at 6.30 tonight in Holywood. If I’ve understood this correctly, they are one point away from their first ever promotion from Division 4 to 3, along with their arch rivals from the north of the county Bredagh.

    It’s a long way from the day when by everyone’s reckoning we beat Ballinahinch, and a near riot ensued because the ref had miscounted the points and put them ahead by one. A long and vociferous protest forced a compromise, and we got a draw out of him.

    Now, instead of relying on the local soccer clubs to give them their training the local facilities are in use most nights and right through the weekend.

    It is great that there is such tremendous focus and local pride, it is the GAA at its best. But it is also noteable that in an area where community relations are generally very good, there is virtually no crossover participation from the unionist community.

  • Realist

    A writer from Annsboro, Co Down to the Irish News today made a very interesting observation.

    He/She informed readers that:

    “Sinn Fein now calls the shots in four or five of our leading GAA Clubs”

    “These Clubs are no longer exclusively devoted to the principles of the GAA but are also used as recruiting dens bt covert Sinn Fein members beavering away to their own agenda”

    He/She asks, “with all their wealth, why doesn’t Sinn Fein build their own halls or club houses?”

    Community based amateur sports, providing you adher to the republican agenda.

    Unionists need not apply.

  • Peking

    “But it is also noteable that in an area where community relations are generally very good, there is virtually no crossover participation from the unionist community.”

    Catch yourself on. This is the GAA we’re talking about here. The organisation that hosts parades, gatherings and god knows what else for the provos, and you’re wondering why unionists won’t go near it.
    Maybe this could be presented as more proof of the Protestant lack of culture.

  • Mick Fealty

    Peking,

    Whilst I most decidedly did not apportion blame, nevertheless you make a valid point. Institutionally the GAA does not yet appear to be ‘up’ for serious cross community engagement, though there are some moves on the edges that indicate some would like to move that way.

    I know several Protestants who have played GAA at junior level, but the wider culture of the organisation routinely squeezes them out before they get to play the game seriously. I know more who routinely watch the game on television, but would not go to a match because they perceive the organisation roughly in the way you describe.

    However it is not really a problem for Unionists. Neither is it a problem for Nationalists who believe that cross community engagement is an minor irrelevance.

    In the strict context of NI neither is Rugby cross community in the way that soccer, cricket (in western parts at least) and a range of minor sports are, but it does have broader support in the rest of the island, and is one of the few codes capable of unifing sporting sentiment across the island.

    All of which leaves the GAA (for all its grace, beauty and amateur integrity) as something of a sporting anomaly.

  • Alan Law

    I always thought it odd that the singing of the Irish National Anthem at Croke Park, was a sort of karoke affair.
    The words go up on the big screen….just a little, sure we’re oirish, but just not sure of the lingo!

    Alan

  • chauncy

    Was not Jack Boothman (former GAA President) Protestant?

  • Peking

    “Was not Jack Boothman (former GAA President) Protestant?”

    Well that’s everything sorted then.
    The same way as Sir John Gorman being both Catholic and unionist proves that unionism is non-sectarian.

  • chauncy

    Fair point, Peking, in a way, sort of..though my question, was merely that i.e. a query..

    I wouldn’t have gone so far as to say that Jack Boothman being a Protestant proves that the GAA is non-sectarian though..

    For what it’s worth, I think there is a very different perception of the GAA either side of the border – though I think that points been made elsewhere.

    Where I live everyone plays everything, no questions asked about religious affiliation. Many of the same people play both rugby and GAA and follow both – no, it’s not Disneyland, it’s Munster..

  • Patrique

    There is a big, big world outside Belfast, if you could only see it.The GAA is played in 32 counties, and with the exception of part of Belfast, and a couple of wing nuts in other parts of the north, it is a sport for all. Billy Wright played Gaelic football.

    As for the crass statement about another child brought up to hate prods etc, the majority of children, and adults, in the Republic know absolutely nothing about N.Iteland, and care even less. But that would be part of that bigger world.

  • Liam Gordon

    This corruption rant is nonsense Mr G. One metric is provided by Transparency International: the RoI ranks 19th clustering with ‘corrupt’ countries like the US, France and Belgium (mid 7.0) with your comparable, Italy scoring 5.0, ranking 40th.
    http://ww1.transparency.org/cpi/2005/cpi2005.sources.en.html

    On what basis do you link Italy to Ireland? And how do you get from a wee kid enjoying a moment of fame to “Ireland is corrupt”?

  • Most cups will usually end up in every school in the country. If that is corruption what is not corrupt

  • Garibaldy

    That survey rates Ireland there, others have rated it as around the same as Italy. I saw reports at the time, but amn’t going to chase references as I haven’t time.

    To be clear, I’ve no objection to the GAA, its ethos, or its outreach programmes, and fully support taking Sam or the Mc Carthy to schools. What I am slightly curious about is how the most prestigious cup in Ireland ends up in people’s back gardens with their children climbing inside it. Hardly respectful of a valuable item, with immense cultural significance. And indicative of the cute hoor gombeen attitudes of lots of Irish people.

    I’m saying it’s symptomatic of systemic corruption problems in Irish society. Ireland is comparable to Italy in people’s attitudes to ignoring or getting round the rules. We’ve seen the various tribunals on a huge range of issues, the recent reports on the Gardaí (and I know of several instances of low-level corruption there and in the police in the north myself), the continued election and popularity of numerous corrupt politicians etc. And there are a lot of stories to come out of the north regarding corruption in planning and such like as well. Never mind the whole black economy issue, where people fund paramilitarism and organised criminality. To suggest Irish society north and south is not riddled with corruption is to bury one’s head in the sands.

    My code for this is ‘soveit27’. A timely reminder of the dangers of corruption.

  • Chris Donnelly

    Mick

    You raise a valid point about unionist participation in the GAA and nationalist (northern)participation in Rugby.

    Much of it is to do with schooling, as indeed it is in the south of Ireland. The school you attend will often dictate sporting preferences. The strongest GAA schools are obviously catholic Grammar schools, given that the major underage tournament in Ulster involves 6th year pupils.

    Very few non-grammar schools have succeeded in making an impact on the GAA scene, with La Salle’s recent successes an exception. Most of the secondary schools- both state and catholic- opt for soccer as the game of choice, whilst many protestant/ state grammars have a long tradition of playing rugby.

    I’ve always felt that protestant participation in GAA and northern catholic participation in rugby would need to start at school level if it is to seriously get beyond being simply a spectator sport for the relevant community in each case.

    And that will be quite a challenge, given how reluctant most sports teachers are to depart from the traditional sports in their respective schools.

    None of this is to diminish the political and historical reasons why rugby and GAA have failed to ‘cross’ the divide here, but it certainly is a major obstacle.

  • Liam Gordon

    Or to put it another way…’I think it therefore I don’t need anything to back it up’.

    Sorry Mr G- even the OECD & UN are very comfortable with the TI’s survey and link to it from their websites. Ireland is less corrupt that Italy (by quite a margin) and ranks with the US.

    As for the Cup- there are two. A copy does the rounds whilst the orginal is under lock and key. Seems like a very logically appraoch for the rampantly corrupt “cute hoor gombeen” Irish. Having a duplicate Cup is systematic of …pragmatism? logic? a desire to share but a concern for a “valuable item, with immense cultural significance”.

    Better head in the sand with facts than head in the clouds with none?

  • Garibaldy

    More like I read it a while ago, in a newspaper, but wasn’t paying much attention at the time and have little to no chance of finding it. Even granting that Ireland is less corrupt than Italy, it’s still a corrupt society, as has been demonstrated beyond all question by the sort of things I quoted in my last post. Are you seriously questioning that corruption is rampant north and south? You say I have no facts. It seems to me you’re ignoring a lot of evidence.

    And as for the US and corruption – we all saw an election being stolen not 6 years ago right in front of the eyes not only of the Americans but the entire world. Harldy a poster boy.

  • Liam Gordon

    This picture sums up everything that is right about the GAA- access, connection, “no airs-nor-graces”. No prancing primadonnas.

    All tempered by the pragmatism of using a duplicate Cup.

  • Liam Gordon

    Sure you did not hear it from a bloke down the pub?

    What’s that noise? Goal posts being moved? Ireland clusters with the ‘could do better’ countries. Not as corrupt as you seem prone to believe but Ireland is no Iceland.

    You’ve gone quiet on the misuse and abuse of the Cup:
    “What I am slightly curious about is how the most prestigious cup in Ireland ends up in people’s back gardens with their children climbing inside it. Hardly respectful of a valuable item, with immense cultural significance. And indicative of the cute hoor gombeen attitudes of lots of Irish people.”

    Do you withdraw this bizzare comment?

  • wes

    Quite a number of Catholics schools now play rugby, as well as Gaelic & Soccer in the North.

  • Liam Gordon

    Re: US election. I dislike Bush but he won, as far as I can tell, fair and square under the US electoral college system. Furthermore, about a year after the election, several newspapers accessed all the ballots ruled on by the SCOTUS (recount halted): even the most “Gore friendly” count left Gore short of winning Florida.

    Shambolic? Certanity.
    Corrupt? Mmm- probably not.

  • Garibaldy

    Liam,

    What about the people removed from the electoral roll – who coincidentally were overwhelmingly ethnic minorities and Democrats – because companies hired by Republicans in positions of authority “accidentally” mixed them up with people with convictions? They were removed without being told or given the chance to appeal.
    Never mind the corruption of the entire US system due to the need to keep donors sweet for the hundreds of millions spent on re-election. Remember what happened Bill Clinton’s healthcare reforms? American political corruption goes a lot deeper than a few thousand disputed votes.

    On the goalposts, I did for the sake of argument concede that you may have been correct about the Italy issue, but that does not change the fact that Ireland is substantially and disgracefully corrupt, north and south. That was the point I was making, and there’s more than enough evidence for it to be undeniable. Could do better is certainly understimating the problem.

    As for the topic at hand, in the first comment on this thread I acknowledged that Mick had made a valid point, and the flexibility and community nature is one of the GAA’s main strength. As for the cup, I clearly had neglected the copy issue. But there’s still symbolism, and I don’t think that the Sam Maguire (original or copy) should ever be the plaything of the winning county and its team to show round their mates (or their political associates) like a souvenir from holiday. I know from family connections of people using it to drink beer from etc when it was brought round to their house. And that attitude is indicative of a wider problem in Irish society.

  • Heinrich Himmler

    Ahhhh

    Seeing that photo brings back many fond memories of my time spent with the Hitler Youth playing NAZI sports.

  • Anna Dale

    I heard a while ago that Methodist College Belfast were thinking of starting up a GAA team amongst their latest intake of silver-spooned darlings.

    This kind of knocked me out of my usual state of apathetic cynicism.

    Not because they were so liberal to reckon that such a blatant expression of Irishism was OK-Yah in Northern Ireland 2006, but I thought at the school level the posh schools, the likes of St Malachys, the mirror of MCB on the other side, kind of ran scared of getting too involved with the proles from the AndiesTown etc kicking shit out of their own little silver-spooned darlings and didn’t really get too involved with schools gaelic sports

    Or maybe I’m guilty of being classcist or some other crime that I haven’t yet learnt the definition of.

  • Patrique

    Ireland is the most corrupt place in the world, or certainly 2nd after the good old US of A.

    Al Gore was announced the winner of Florida, by a street, and then 45 minutes later, “Oh, we might have made a mistake”. George Bush did not win Florida, and I watched the thing all night long. The US president election fixed live on TV.

    Most of the parents of Methody children are from Andytown, now living in Malone, hence the Gaelic team.

  • Mick O’Heir

    Joe Cahill was most likely the original mole in the IRA. Look at Bullet head’s record. He blew his own cover after internment by giving an on the run iterview in Ballymurphy. This allowed him flee south where he stuffed up the Claudia and other operations and where he went on a weak-willed hunger strike. No doubt Gerry Adams, his MP and suspected MI5 agent, whose son kicked ball for Antrim, allowed this hurler on the ditch look on Sam before he went to his eternal damnation.

    The attitude of the Loyalist apologists here to a kid getting close to a trophy shows how they can have no part in a united Ireland as they are only a libility.

    Also, when Tyrone were all Irleand champions, the guy in charge of the cup brought it to all comers. Dedication they call it. It is a trait found in the GAA but not so much in the mercenary sports it competes with.

  • Nic

    I do tend to agree with at least the substance of Liam Gordon’s points on corruption in Ireland.

    What Eoghan Harris calls Moby Dick and other mortals call the silent majority should not be underestimated.
    Yer typcial tiger cubs is “nothing more” than a ‘burbie with a massive mortgage, horrendous fuel bills, 60 hour working week and a 2.5 hours a day commute. Who’s constantly reminded they never had it so good. Yer not on the dole any more, is the subliminal message.

    This 99% are in the main law-abiding, without major political connections, powerless to change things on their own and haven’t the time or the energy (see above) to organise politically. They just have to take whatever crap their udc or the dail throws at them.

    Ireland’s problem with perceived corruption is actually a frustration at a lopsided economy that even in the good old tiger days was overly dependant on and dominated by builders and plumbers. Who consequently get all the press. And we all know how they operate, and the kind of image they project, eh?

    It’s enough to make yer blood boil, isnit? Two more a dem, George, and turn on the Sky Sports, willya? Cheers.

  • Liam Gordon

    If you are convicted of a felony in the US you often lose the right to vote. Is that what you are going on about? And look if people are dumb enough not to be able to vote correctly…I’m afriad it is hard to have much sympathy.

    Most US citizens are opposed to a European-style medical system- Mrs. Clinton badly misjudged political opinion. The $$ fueled lobbying wouldn’t have worked if a majority had support the Dems in 1994.

    According to the evidence (only evidence) provided, Ireland is less corrupt than Japan, Spain and Israel; and much less corrupt than Italy, Greece and Taiwan. Ireland is comparable to such dastardly countries as Belguim, France and the US. All and all- could do better.

    Help me understand why giving access to a duplicate Sam to the supporters who follow the team, is indicative of a corrupt country? About two years ago I sat next to a duplicate Stanley Cup- does that make the Canadians corrupt? I seem to remember the English rugby team bashing up the World Cup in a drunken binge- thus England must be more corrupt since they we using the original?

    I’m coming to the conclusion that you are a prude- heaven forbid people should enjoy themselves. The down to earthedness is the magic of the GAA. As I said ‘no airs nor graces’.

    I think you are caught in a time warp- Ireland was a bit of a disaster 20 years ago re:corruption. Now, the country is in B/B+ range and is progressing nicely to the loft heights of Iceland.

  • Brendan, Belfast

    Chris Donnelly wrote
    “I still have vivid recollections of the time Barry Breen brought the Sam Maguire into my school for us pupils to see up close after Down’s initial triumph in the early 90s.”

    of course Chris, Down’s initial triumph was in 1960 – but i take your point!

  • Mick Fealty

    Then 61 and 68!! But I think Chris was refering to the first of two in the 90’s: 91 and 94. I’m just old enough to remember most of that 68 team playing Cavan in Casement.

  • Donegal-John

    When Donegal won the All Ireland in 1992, I and a few friends went to the local pub to take part in the celebrations.

    when we entered the pub we were approached by a couple of thugs who told us that we had no right to be here,due to the fact that we were protestants this forced us to leave.

    This is certainly not a sport for all.

  • Donegal-Sam

    Donegal-John, I was there that night and you weren’t asked to leave because you were a Protestant but because you were a spoofer that kept annoying people. I see things haven’t changed much there then…

  • Fer fecks sake

    “And indicative of the cute hoor gombeen attitudes of lots of Irish people. ”

    For fuck sake, you must be a twisted hoor yourself if thats what you take from a photo of a child inside the Sam Maguire.

    Sam Maguire travels the lenght and breadth Ireland constantly and can be seen and accessed by everyone who wants to see it. Simple as that. It is a credit to the GAA that the grassroots at small GAA clubs can have access the second greatest prize in Ireland (first being the Liam McCarthy cup of course!)

    A few years ago it was on display at my GAA club. I didnt bother going to see it, I’m a hurler, I dont care for football that much actually.

    And it must stay somewhere while its on its travels. And I’m sure some family gets the privilege of having it in their house for the night before it moves on. Imagine that, the “cute gombeen hoors”.

  • Michael Robinson

    “And indicative of the cute hoor gombeen attitudes of lots of Irish people. “

    I’ve just received a copy of the August 06 Ulster Rugby Supporters Club Newsletter and if I tell you there is a photo with the caption…

    “For 6 year old Ellie from Coleraine it was an opportunity to be photographed IN the cup rather than with it!”

    … you can probably guess what the photo is of… (although this is the Celtic League cup rather than the Sam Maguire)

  • Sydney Exile

    Mayo Mayo Sam Maguire is going to Mayo.
    Take that you Dirty Dubs.
    Oh to see the Hill !!!!
    Come on the Kingdom you are next.

  • sam brown

    Unionists should come to terms with the fact that they are a despised minority and that GAA is the biggest gamr on this island of ours, as witnesssed by the crowds in Croker. It is good that the rugby and soccer crowds havr to go begging to the new sporting masters of Ireland. Whatever about rugby, soccer is a total joke. They couldn’t even afford a cup, let along a good manager. How many supporters did Dublin Uttd aka Home Farm have again? 200?

    Go back to England and take your stupid games with you.

  • chauncy

    Sam,

    Did you forget to take your daily ration?

    But then, you’re trolling…so, I wonder if there’s any point asking you what people might constitute the majority, in your opinion, if unionists are a despised minority? Do the rugby and soccer crowds you refer to form part of this majority?

    How come I’ve missed out on this hierarchy of yours which has the GAA at the top?

    Since when does the ‘island’ belong to you and whom do you purport to represent?

    (FYI My kids play both GAA and soccer, my brother rugby…)

  • Dec

    Not because they were so liberal to reckon that such a blatant expression of Irishism was OK-Yah in Northern Ireland 2006, but I thought at the school level the posh schools, the likes of St Malachys, the mirror of MCB on the other side, kind of ran scared of getting too involved with the proles from the AndiesTown etc kicking shit out of their own little silver-spooned darlings and didn’t really get too involved with schools gaelic sports.

    You’ll find St Malachy’s has always had a football team, often populated with ‘little silver-spooned darlings’ from Ardoyne, the Bone and the New Lodge (at least during my day). Not necessarily a very good one, mind.

  • John Hurson

    As i’m the person who took this photo, and had it on the flickr web site, it has totally amazed me the reaction from the small minded people who have commented on it. Of all the posts, how many of them are relevant to the photo.
    This is a photo of a 4 year old boy who is sitting in the Sam and enjoying every minute of it. Now, what harm is he doing to the cup? And so what if I was able to have the cup in my back garden? Isn’t that not what the cup is for? Is it not an amazing thing that people have the chance to have the cup in the comfort of their own homes? Honestly, how many of the negative posters here have witnessed their county win an All Ireland, and had the pleasure of seeing it cross into their county the day after?
    He also has a photo with himself in it 2 years ago alongside the manager, Mickey Harte. So, in the space of his 4 years, he has had the chance to sit in the cup twice. I had to wait 35 years to see the cup in Tyrone. This kid has a memory etched in his head forever, and no doubt will go on to become a footballer himself, and a supporter of the GAA. This is what makes the GAA a very important aspect of our lives in Ireland and futher afield.
    So, wise up, grow up, and get over your jealousy and just enjoy the photo for what it is. A very happy 4 year old Tyrone boy sitting in the Sam, in Tyrone. It is a disgrace that some of you morons have turned it into a political rant. You are very sad lonely people, who are getting left behind in the new Ireland. I feel very sorry for you……..

    John

  • One of the reasons the South is so successful is their ability to “get round the rules”.

    When Tyrone won Sam, there was a systematic campaign, very deliberate, of bringing the Cup to as many primary schools and old and infirm people as possible.

    Far from being ‘corruption’, this is just good marketing by the GAA. It could be a hundred years before we win the thing again; and it ensures a stronger team in the future to take on the Dublins and Kerrys of this world if as many Tyrone people as possible share in our occasional successes and hopefully grow up to play for Tyrone.

    GAA people mostly are country Irish people remember; not into stiff display. Don’t judge us through a prism of 1950s British culture; don’t confuse affectionate informality with disrespect.

    As for you needing to be someone “special” to pose beside the Cup, well that would defeat the point of deliberately bringing the Cup to as many people as possible. Tyrone houses are full of photos of ordinary Jos, many of whom never kicked a ball in their life, proudly posing beside Sam. It was easier to bump into Sam than to avoid him. These photos, contrary to what non-GAA people might think, are not the exception for GAA insiders. They’re two-a-penny photo-opps, available to anyone who reads the papers and bothers to show up at one of the many public airings of the Cup.

    Local school kids are trained in their primary school by one of the Tyrone senior team trainers every week. I suppose G. might see that as being corrupt” as well. I’d say it’s great professionalism and commitment by the GAA.

    We all know Ireland is corrupt; just as England isn’t; cash for honours anyone?

    To debase a serious point about corruption in public life by dragging the GAA into it shows how little Garbledaldi knows about the GAA.

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