If you go down to the beach today


http://www.goodbeachguide.co.uk/

The Good Beach Guide, published by the Marine Conservation Society came out on Friday. I’ve pasted the link, as its quite an interesting and informative site.

The good news is: 8 beaches have been recommended, an increase on 6 beaches in 2005.

The bad news is: Newcastle in County Down was issued with a warning, and its water quality was judged to be poor as a result of the discharge of raw sewage. The MCS said “Northern Ireland Water service was responsible for 23.5% of all water pollution incidents in 2005, but are now due to spend £420 million in wastewater treatment works and sewer network upgrades”

The beaches on the recommended list are: Tyrella, White Rocks (Portrush), Cranfield, Crawfordsburn, Helen’s Bay, Murlough (near Newcastle) and 2 at Magilligan.

So, if you go down to the beach today, mind how you go. It’s not always seaweed you’re stepping over, it seems.

  • West Belfast blog

    I hear scap visited portrush LOL. It was in the paper last week, but this weeks head lines are much better.
    Newcastle, is a great little place. If we had some sun, there’d be no need to go anywhere foreign.

  • joeCanuck

    Nothing changes.
    My wife and I went swimming in Newcastle on St.Patrick’s day in 1967. The sun was shining but the water was sure cold. All the shop people came out to look at these two idiots.
    Suddenly we found ourselves swimming in raw sewage.
    Never went back there.

  • West Belfast blog

    Things won’t change this year not with the weather we are having. I think we have missed the summer. LOL

  • crataegus

    Helen’s Bay and Crawfordsburn surprise me. I would not recommend anywhere in Belfast Lough.

  • joeCanuck

    I can’t really comment on the present state of those beaches, Crataegus, but back in the 70’s I lived in Bangor and spent quite a bit of time at both those beaches with my family. The beaches themselves, and the water, were both very clean and pleasant to visit.

  • crataegus

    Joecanuck

    I frequently take a walk along the shore in North Down and Newtownabbey and have seen material washed ashore that looks less than wholesome, that’s why it surprises me, but would be happy to be proved wrong.

    I have been informed that at times of heavy rain there is raw sewerage flowing into the Lough as the sewerage plants can’t store the volume of material. This is part of the problem with having a sewerage system that is not entirely separate from the surface water drainage. I am not sure of the currents but the shape of the Lough would tend to suggest that such material would take a while before it got out to sea.

    On the issue of Down coast generally some years ago I went to a lecture on the effects of radioactive leaks at Sellafield. Apparently radioactive caesium comes in on the sea spray along the Down coast. Put me right off the thoughts of retiring to a cottage by the sea, but then again when 70 I suppose it doesn’t really matter much.

  • sluggerette

    When I posted the picture this morning of the beach in Rostrevor,I was capturing the beauty of it all. I’ve changed the picture now, and this is the reality of it.

    Dreadful what we allow to happen to our own precious landscapes

  • eranu

    cant believe in western europe in the 21st century, raw sewage is pumped into the sea. fair enough in the 3rd world but its pretty pathetic in rich europe. i believe it happens around the med too?