Time for compromise (rules)

October is compromise season in the GAA, as you probably know. The annual double-header against the Aussie footballers gets the most publicity, but the games against Scotland’s shinty players are interesting too. Ireland lost the first game 20-17, but this Scottish report on the game is worth reading if you’re a hurling fan.

  • looking in

    Good to see shinty getting some coverage. Scotland’s performance is good given that the level of amateur “professionalism” in GAA makes fair comparison difficult.

    Oh.. and the caman is a tricky stick to master unlike that big dinner plate called a hurley… 😉

  • Todd

    Last I knew abou this comp was that only the weaker counties in Ireland were allowed field players as the GAA want to give them some exposure.

  • looking in

    Indeed Irish news says it is for players from counties that played in christy ring and nicky rackard cups…whatever they are?

    But, I think it confirms that the level of amatuerism is trying to be matched rather than getting the semi-pros of big counties to play.

  • crow

    Games like hurling and gaelic football, as great as they are, are ultimately doomed unless they can be exported. Sports in many respects are just like languages. This competition and the Aussie compromise games are a good start but the GAA should really be doing more to promote these games outside of Ireland.

  • bob

    “Games like hurling and gaelic football, as great as they are, are ultimately doomed unless they can be exported”

    Doomed !

    Millions of spectators, huge sponsorship, Croke Park & a huge increase in club membership

  • Setanta

    Any one know anything about Shinty.

  • Headmelter

    When and where is the return match?

  • maca

    “Games like hurling and Gaelic football, as great as they are, are ultimately doomed unless they can be exported”

    Firstly, I disagree, Gaelic Football seems stronger than ever in Ireland, although hurling is suffering a bit.
    Secondly, the GAA are promoting the game outside of Ireland. There’s numerous clubs all over Britain, and in the past few years there has been new clubs emerging in Europe. And don’t forget the NAGAA in the US, and the clubs in other parts of the world like Australia, Japan or Argentina.
    The sports are slowly gaining a foothold in these places, however what is needed to move things along is major international exposure. The GAA should be working more on that IMO.

  • aonghus

    I know nothing about shinty,
    but these people do

    Oh, look, they use a dead language on their homepage!

  • looking in

    Any one know anything about Shinty.

    Go visit the camanachd web site

    When and where is the return match?

    It is an annual end of season affair.

    [80’s Ben Elton]Little bit of local political comment – funny, whilst ulster scots (laird et al) love to get tarted up in tartan, highland dance, pipe bands and get all misty eyed, there is never any mention of shinty. Always amuses me that specific selectivity. Wonder why…..? 😉 [/80’s Ben Elton]

  • looking in

    Nice one aonghus!

  • Baluba

    Jeezuz, the camáin that the scottish lads use are brutal if the catch you across the shins! More like a 9 iron than a camán. They can strike the ball quare and fierce too off the deck.

    The footy will be difficult this year. The Aussies have picked a small, fast, skilful team and Kevin Sheedy is a legendary coach in their code having been at the Bombers (the Kerry of Aussie Rules) for about 30 years!!!

    Expect Ciarán Mac Donald to get special attention in the midfield. I’m sure he’ll give as good as he gets. Benny Coulter should stick a few in the onion for us and hopefully Joycey has big games too. Seán Marty Lockhart will likely torment the life out of anyone who looks dangerous in the forward line.

    There are 3 very fast, very tough Sydney Swans players on the team (this years premiership winners) who will be hard to stop.

    Big jobs for Cavanagh and Dooher!!!

    Éire abú!!!!

  • Ringo

    Indeed Irish news says it is for players from counties that played in christy ring and nicky rackard cups…whatever they are?

    They are the second and third division inter-county competitions – the Liam McCarthy being the top division.

    What I’d like to know is, considering there were Ulster lads on the side, what does the Ulster-Scots Agency make of it all?

  • Mick Fealty

    I agree that GAA is very healthy in Ireland, but it doesn’t mean that there is no merit in seeking to export it. The Australian ladies team is made up of people for whom Gaelic is only their third choice. And yet they were skilled enough to beat a senior club team in Co Dublin recently.

    It would be wrong to turn away from the kind of buzz that comes from internationalising the sport. There’s an argument too that the Compromise Rules test matches should be used to more aggressively promote to the profile of the GAA in Australia or Scotland. I’ve not seen Shinty, but certainly the opinions of some Aussie players I’ve spoken to is that Gaelic is a more skilful, graceful game. It’s easier on the bones too for the over thirties.

  • maca

    There already is some degree of contact between GAA & Aussie Rules clubs in Europe. They should work together to develop the sports. Compromise Rules itself could actually gain some recognition as a real sport rather than simply an annual experiment.

  • Baluba

    Shit, you’ve been talking to different Aussies than me!!! I lived in the Godforsaken place for two years and have to go back in June for another two for my sins and the prevailing attitude was that our beautiful game was soft and disorganised (that one really made me laugh when you watch them chasing after the ball like hyenas after an injured antelope).

    The lads I plyed it with though did say it was faster, more aerobic and relentless. They never ever said it was more skilful, but we all know that it is! ;o)

    I love Aussie Rules with a burning passion by the way (almost as much as football and not quite nearly as much as the game of legends – hurling!!!)
    Gaelic games are healthy as hell. Damnú on the rest of the world. If you look on GAA.ie it’ll tell you every registered club in the world, they’re everywhere! Argentinian hurling club!?! Madness.

    I wouldn’t bother my arse spending GAA money on abroad. Compromise Rulles is great fun, but Ireland’s the home and the hub of Gaelic games!!!

  • maca

    Feckin Aussies, they have almost 20 metres of goal width to aim for and sometimes they still miss. Skillful, sheez! I hope you put them straight out there Baluba.

  • maca

    By the way, anyone heard of the Gaelic Football game coming out for playstation? An Aussie Rules game has been adapted to make a Gaelic football game, i’d love to get my hands on it.

  • John T Tim

    Here’s the scoop (release date 11th nov)

    “For the first time ever exclusively on the PlayStation 2, take to the field in this fully licensed GAA Gaelic Football challenge. Experience the skill and excitement of one of the world’s oldest games as you battle for victory with your favourite County teams.
    Kick it over the crossbar for Kerry, or score a goal in the net for Dublin. Whoever you support they’re all here. Hours of action packed gaming as you fight your way through to the finals!

    Game Features:

    All 32 County Teams (plus London & New York) in the Latest Strips
    Realistic On-Field Play
    Full Match & Player Statistics
    Stunning Croke Park & Various County Grounds
    Live Commentary From Ireland’s Leading Gaelic Football Media Personalities
    League, Provincial & All Ireland Championships
    Real Time Lighting & Shadows on Players
    Gaelic & English Languages
    Decals (Mud, Bandages) Appearing On Players Throughout The Match
    Superb 3D Graphics & Motion Capture Animations”

  • maca

    Cool. Thanks John.

  • looking in

    Jeezuz, the camáin that the scottish lads use are brutal if the catch you across the shins! More like a 9 iron than a camán. They can strike the ball quare and fierce too off the deck

    Indeed – most players still don’t wear helmets – a school friend lost an eye at age of 16/17….and without pads shins just accumulate notches up the bone….Shinty players often play golf and their swing is interesting – but they hit golf ball a mile as well!

    On the popularisation – i think both shinty and GAA are fine – keep the identities – most shinty players would play a couple of other sports as well – so it is good to see GAA ridding themselves of only-GAA fixation – my partners father was chucked out for playing football in sixties!

  • Ringo

    Heard Sean Kelly there recently saying that some school boards in Canada had adopted Gaelic Football for their PE curriculum – supposedly the way it used hands as well as feet was one of the main attractions in terms of kids development.

    As for the need to go abroad – they have already spread their tentacles about as far as possible – something like 7000 people participated in the Asian Gaelic games in China last month. But there will never be a big breakthrough beyond the Irish sphere of influence in my opinion.

    The two games cannot be lumped in together anyway. Lets face it, GAA football is frequently scrappy, labourious and when detached from personal affiliation no better to watch than than rugby or soccer. Hurling on the otherhand is on a different level. It is rare to get a well matched game played at anything from intermediate club grade upwards that isn’t completely engrossing – Riverdance with sticks.

  • Baluba

    Maca I was e-mailed the new ad for the game recently I’m trying desperately to find it for you and it’s hilarious. Bear with me.

  • Ringo

    Decals (Mud, Bandages) Appearing On Players Throughout The Match

    I wonder if your goalkeeper can gouge The Gooch’s eyes out when the ref’s back is turned?

  • maca

    Ringo
    “Riverdance with sticks.”

    I didn’t think it was possible but you’ve just put me off hurling! 🙂

    Baluba
    That’d be great. GRMA.

  • Ringo

    maca –

    don’t blame me – it was Liam Griffin who coined the phrase!

  • maca

    “don’t blame me – it was Liam Griffin who coined the phrase!”

    Bastard! 🙂

    I found the Gaelic football game online, available for pre-order: £30, free delivery. Time to tell the missus what i want for christmas 🙂

  • Donnie

    Time to tell the missus what i want for christmas 🙂

    It’s the only way Longford are going to get a sniff of Sam!

    By the way it’s mandatory that u-18 hurlers wear a helmet now.

  • maca

    Donnie
    “It’s the only way Longford are going to get a sniff of Sam!”

    I can’t even respond with a witty comment, the truth hurts too much.
    At least Longford Town are doing ok in the soccer 🙂