Politicians and how we treat them online

“Politics is a rough old trade”, John Major noted in his concession speech in 1997. I suppose it comes with the territory of being a politician, you put your name out there and you should be willing to take some flak from the public. Now, this is not a piece defending politicians I have to stress. I read dozens of news stories everyday and lament the missed opportunities and failures of leadership that we often see on our TV screens. …

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Has the new media revolution changed anything about the way we do politics?

FitzJamesHorse has some provocative thoughts on politics and the internet – not to mention the continuing ridicule of Loyalism. He comes to the ‘sage’ conclusion (again) that bloggers don’t matter. But Facebook and Twitter and YouTube do, he says. Actually, these are all, in whichever form, micro blogging platforms. In all cases, the primacy of conversation and the capacity to network information and comment are the main shifts from older ‘one to one’ or ‘one to many’ forms of communication. Has the …

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New media is forcing politicians to engage (and the way we will do politics to change)

So the Oireachtas report on the Growth of Social Media and tackling Cyberbullying has gone for a sensible approach to the issue of the internet and cyberbullying. Karlin Lillington in the Irish Times contrasts a measured report with a sometimes hysterical reaction in parliament: One of the more ludicrous sideshows in the online bullying debate surrounding the Oireachtas hearings and submissions and the consequent report, however, was the regularity with which politicians made the story all about them. They too, …

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#DigitalLunch: Why do Politicians Lie?

Starting 1pm join us for #DigitalLunch on why Politicians lie… Plenty of links and stories at the event page on Google Plus, here. If you want to make a point in person, you can jump in but you will need to register with Google Plus first (easier than it sounds). See you soon… Mick FealtyMick is founding editor of Slugger. He has written papers on the impacts of the Internet on politics and the wider media and is a regular …

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Britain and Ireland: Innocence versus experience?

Fascinating couple of pieces on the major shift in British politics in the last decade, which would seem to be a shift in preference towards young and inexperienced leaders… First this paper from Phillip Cowley of Nottingham University on the rise and rise of career politicians… In a précis on his university’s school of politics blog: The current trance of leaders are not as exceptional in their youth as they are in their inexperience. It is not the case that …

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Will any other NI party leaders stand down before 2015?

table showing NI politician ages

Later on today, we’ll have a clearer picture about the candidates that will be seeking to become SDLP leader and deputy leader. The SDLP will be hoping that its membership will democratically elect someone who can steer the party away from decline (or what Seamus Mallon described as “the low rung on the ladder” on last night’s Hearts and Minds) and back towards sustainable growth. The party will be longing for a stable leadership in the run up to the …

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Slugger Awards: More new categories please?

Work on the new Slugger Awards has been in abeyance, partly because of an enormous workload over November.  For reference you can check out the post from when we first called for new categories last September. But we’re keen to get the new categories tied down quickly over the next week or so. To recap, we are asking you to tell us what qualities or aspects we should be rewarding in politicians, the media and public bodies. It’s your chance to …

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Blog tip #1: Spin doesn’t work!

In the countdown to the Irish Blogger Conference (registration now open), we have a tip a day from Slugger on how and why politicians should consider blogging. Popular Blogs are popular because people feel they get the straight dope, if not the last word on the question. Conventional party spin only works within the controlled space of the lobby, and the time constraints of print deadlines. Blogs blow that space wide open, and that conversational zone their stories become iterative. …

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