Eastwood “I still know that the constitutional position will not be changed overnight even in with the upheaval caused by Brexit”

SDLP Leader, Colum Eastwood gave an address to the D’Arcy McGee Summer School on Brexit and he made some interesting comments about how Unionist parties view comments on this subject from Nationalist leaders;

I am conscious that unionism’s kneejerk reaction to this kind of language will be naturally defensive and some will automatically assume that I am speaking about some sort of sudden re-unification to avoid Brexit.

Let me be clear – I am not.

Of course my view as an Irish nationalist is that a re-unified Ireland would be better for everyone -but that was my view pre-Brexit too.

However, I still know that the constitutional position will not be changed overnight even in with the upheaval caused by Brexit.

I also know that this change will only ever happen, and will only ever be worth having, if we can convince a significant number of those who hold a British identity in the North that a New Ireland can better provide them with opportunity, fairness and belonging.

That same argument needs to be made to many Northern nationalists too. We have a big job of work to do in order to provide that New Ireland with definition and detail.

That is exactly what we agreed to in the Good Friday Agreement and we’re sticking by it, pre-Brexit and post-Brexit. It was the Irish people, North and South, who made that decision and no Irish political party or organisation holds the authority to change that position.

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  • The worm!

    What’s that got to do with the past struggles of a farmer living about Derrylin or Donaghmore?

    What’s your point?

  • Ben De Hellenbacque

    That NI ‘harboured’ them, gave them refuge or safe haven. Delete as appropriate to emotive term.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    their country

  • MainlandUlsterman

    really? Demographics favour Union for the foreseeable.

  • lizmcneill

    No English ports between the Falls and the Shankill.

  • The worm!

    As you seem to have misread it, I’ll repeat the question.

    “What’s that got to do with the past struggles of a farmer living about Derrylin or Donaghmore?”

    I know full well what he meant thank you very much. I just see no relevance of his point to the discussion which he jumped in on.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    indeed, long may Adams linger from that point of view. He’s a millstone to the Shinners I think. I’m sure plots are afoot. Then again, who else have they got?

  • MainlandUlsterman

    problem for nationalism in NI though is that it is now dominated by SF/IRA. They fight dirty but the truth is they are a pushover for unionists. Even the DUP can run rings around them. Nationalism as you say needs to dump the damaged goods if it is serious about spreading the secessionist gospel.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    well said – SF/DUP axis has been a failure

  • MainlandUlsterman

    Isn’t the fundamental problem nationalism has deeper than even Eastwood acknowledges here? It is this: if you accept there are two national identities on the island of equal validity, what exactly is the “Irish nation” that is to be united? It used to be asserted all on the island were all one people; it is now conceded that we actually aren’t, when it comes to national allegiance. So why such an imperative to merge both groups into a new amalgam country?

  • Conor

    Ni is already in political union with a country that has political instability of a minority government and has it’s own financial problems where Ni is only 3% representation.

  • Karl

    NI will still be part of the EU customs union. It will be the price Theresa pays for not being laughed out of the negotiations

  • lizmcneill

    Well, the “United” Kingdom is hardly that either, is it?

  • sparrow

    You wrote: ‘No but it did harbour (and in some cases more than that!) the people who did.’ What did you mean by that? How did the republic ‘harbour’ paramilitaries in a way that NI didn’t?

  • The worm!

    Ah right, I get it now.

    Just to remind you, the slugger definition of “whataboutery”.

    “The respondent retrenches his/her position and rejigs the question, being careful to pick open a sore point on the part of questioner’s ‘tribe’. He/she then fires the original query back at the inquirer.”

    Yep, I’d say it fits you perfectly!

  • Ben De Hellenbacque

    What is that in an increasingly globalised context? Is it something mawkishly sentimental or is there some definable philosophy that “their country” embodies better than any other?

  • Ben De Hellenbacque

    Maybe that ‘amalgam’ idea is what the UK’s always been about. Therefore, a UI could also be an ‘amalgam’ nation and Ulster Unionists might then feel right at home. Amalgamania (now that sounds like fun) or Amalgamistan where our tribal chiefs live in mountain top hideouts.

  • runnymede

    But independent Ireland has never been cast in that light, and it’s far too late to try to reinvent it now. Post-Brexit we have seen how Ireland still obsesses about identifying itself in opposition to Britain.

    The idea that Sinn Fein and their ilk could even try push a genuinely pluralist agenda is pretty fanciful.

  • Ben De Hellenbacque

    No-one in the brotherhood/sisterhood plots against il capo dei capi! I suspect that Gerry Adams might actually live for ever.
    There is one NI political party that has defied the tendency common to most cults of withering on the vine once their Messiah has been shown the door. But then extreme Unctionism only has bad dreams despite all they’ve ever wanted already being achieved.

  • sparrow

    Nice sidestep. Any chance you could now answer the question, or alternatively, withdraw your statement that the republic ‘harboured’ paramilitaries?

  • Sub

    Their sense of supremacy perhaps

  • Ben De Hellenbacque

    What are you trying to say now? That there is only one Unionist in Fermanagh, he is male and his name is James?

  • Sub

    The major flaw in your argument is believing the UUP are moderates. Mike Nesbitt anyone?

  • Ben De Hellenbacque

    Um, have you ever crossed the border?

  • The worm!

    For goodness sake it’s hardly earth shattering news that republican paramilitaries come over the border from the republic, attacked protestants in country areas, and scuttled back over again.

    Well come to think of it, maybe it is earth shattering news if you are less than 30 and have only ever believed the shinners version of history.

    If so, I apologise for the shock!

  • The worm!

    Play your silly immature games with someone else.

    Intelligent discussion, which you can be capable of, fine.

    But this nonsense……………………………..!

  • Ben De Hellenbacque

    Of course it is!

  • Ben De Hellenbacque

    Now you know that Unionists are big enough and cuddly enough to speak for themselves.

  • Brian Kann

    A significant number still won’t vote SF, although I’d bow to the stats on whether SF “cannabalise” the outwardly nationalist vote in respect of the SDLP/PNP, as DUP do to the outwardly Unionist vote in respect of the UUP/TUV/PUP. At least historically, the top dog in nationalism wasn’t always a hardline party and there has been considerable churn and change over the course of NI history on that front. You can’t really say the same for Unionism – objectively speaking.

    At the same time, I do appreciate why Unionists want to turn everything back to SF/IRA even if they don’t really figure in the context of the article above.

  • Conor

    I disagree, independent Ireland has a constitution to support different identities and not for one homogeneous ethnic group. Even the tricolour is a representation of both traditions an “amalgam”. I agree the story has got distorted by tribalism.
    Irelands Brexit stance I don’t believe is opposition to Britain but just assertion to maintain as many rights as possible for Irish business and citizens

  • james

    Mike Nesbitt? An extremist, you say?

  • james

    Indeed. The IRA campaign of ethnic cleansing along the border was particularly intense down here.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nZ11H0wR-hQ

  • The worm!

    Yes but at least it has control of it’s own financial affairs and it’s economy is much larger so they don’t notice us as much.

    However, that’s straying unnecessarily far from the original post.

    The fact is, no one should knock independence as they can have no idea what form an independence deal would take. Looked at seriously I believe it’s the one outcome that really could have something for everyone.

  • The worm!

    Dreadful.

    I bought cattle off people along the border, both South Tyrone and South Armagh, and the situation was identical.

    Their own farmyards were essentially no-go areas after dark, they truly lived life under siege.

    I suppose if any comfort can be taken, it’s the fact that the terrorists savage but cowardly campaign hasn’t gotten them any nearer to their ultimate goal. And most of them will probably go to their grave seeing Northern Ireland still under British rule.

  • Sub

    Perhaps i should have framed that better as you have seemed to have missed my point. i mentioned Nesbitt as an example of what happens to a Unionist leader who tries to think outside the tribal box.

  • Hugh Davison

    But it’s not ‘their country’. Other people live there too. There’s no willingness to find a solution that works for everybody. And it’s always ‘yous’ns can like it or lump it’.
    They are doing the same with Brexit. UK creates the border problem and now it’s Irelands to solve. And many of these diehards are farmers, living off the EU purse. But ‘we’d rather eat grass’.

  • Hugh Davison

    When I was growing up, the Pope was the big bogey man. Now it’s Gerry Adams. Children still!

  • Hugh Davison

    Interesting. Would you stay in the EU, if that were possible?

  • sparrow

    So when you say that the republic ‘harboured’ paramilitaries, what you mean is that some republicans used houses in the republic as a base from which to plan and launch their attacks, and then to return to as safe houses? That’s fine. By that definition, NI also harboured paramilitaries then. I’m glad we’ve sorted that one out.

  • The worm!

    Can’t imagine so, but as we are (sadly) talking entirely hypothetically then there should obviously be nothing automatically ruled out.

    Personally, I am continually bemused by the Scottish nationalists who campaign for “independence” yet also wish to remain answerable to a much more belligerent master with the EU.

    Also bear in mind that a good deal of supposed pro-EU sentiment here is actually anti-UK sentiment, so with the UK question being dealt with in some form by independence, there’s no guarantee that there would even still be a majority wanting EU membership.

    However if EU membership was the difference between it happening, or not happening, then you’re in to “lesser of two evils territory” with all the dilemmas that throws up.

    Who knows, all hypothetical.

    I just think it has merit as a basic principle.

  • The worm!

    NI didn’t “harbour” them, they lived here!

    That’s no great secret either.

    But still of no relevance whatsoever to what we were discussing.

  • Trasna

    No knowledge of Irish history then

  • Trasna

    If compensation is being paid out, surely it ought to be paid out go unionist to move to the UK. Isn’t that what normally happens when the colonists move out.

  • Aodh Morrison

    Yes. Have you?

    Reflect back on ‘Ireland 2016′. What narrative was being celebrated? Which was, at best, ignored?

    That shouty guy in uniform much featured in the media gave no time to extolling the virtues of the Irishmen who wore the uniform of the RIC did he?

    The Irish State is centered on a monocultural and single political cultural narrative. Unionists in the early 1900s, as they are now, are the national outlaws. Their rejection of Irish nationalism is their original sin.

    Nothing wrong with that as far as it goes, Ireland made itself in the image of its victors, and of course today the Republic is in transition to a very different place than that dreamed of by the’Men of ’16’.

    Yet while in referendum it may (quite properly) cherish some of the island’s minorities the ‘oldest minority’ remains beyond the (green) Pale.

    To deny that is to deny the reality of the pillars that support the structures of the Irish State beyond the (often) softer words of contemporary politicians and commentators.

  • Trasna

    How is Ireland obsessing about its identity?

  • Trasna

    Is that really different from the Murder Triangle?

  • sparrow

    They lived in the Republic too, so applying your own logic, the Republic didn’t ‘harbour’ them either. See what happens when you start to analyse something, rather than just throwing emotive words about?

  • 05OCT68

    Where would the “haters” move to?

  • 05OCT68

    You left out a never.

  • eamoncorbett

    Yes that’s about the size of it.

  • Sub

    And yet Unionism continues to wallow in a cess pool of sectarianism in the six counties rather than be part of a 21st european state.

  • Sub

    Its quite a bit different Fermanagh had the lowest number of deaths of any region in the North during the troubles.

  • Mach1965

    I did and you made it about Gerry Adams.

  • The worm!

    Yes it did harbour them as they were attacking civilians in Northern Ireland, the fact that they lived there hardly helps!

    But anyway, why all the attempted word plays? Is it to try and avoid facing up to another shameful and unjustifiable part of recent republican history, and in this case the part played in it by the Republic?

    Whether you want to try and deny it or not, it happened, and if you watch the spotlight video which James has linked to, you’ll see that it happened pretty much as I described.

  • james

    Your comment is that a leader should resign over a poor election result.

    Mine was that there are leaders who are guilty of much worse – and haven’t resigned.

    See the connection?

  • Timothyhound

    I sincerely think you’ve misunderstood Ireland’s identifying in opposition to Britain. The vast majority of those I know in the Republic genuinely identify as Irish and European. There are clear close cultural ties with Britain (and indeed the US to some extent). I suggest you take a visit to say Galway – a small, thriving tech driven European and Irish city with no animosity towards Britain or indeed Northern unionists. Sinn Fein do not define Ireland – no party does. In the event of reunification the likelihood is that Sinn Fein would disappear or be subsumed by Fianna Fáil. Take a visit and see for yourself.

  • sparrow

    The IRA launched attacks from the Falls Road. Was the NI state harbouring them? Did the NI state harbour the Shankill Butchers or the Mount Vernon gang?

  • eamoncorbett

    There is a Northern Ireland forum called Stormont which could be called a dead letter.

  • Hugh Davison

    I’m bemused by this ‘belligerent master’ depiction of the EU, which has never declared war on anyone and which has done a lot to protect the rights of ordinary citizens.
    However, in the hypothetical case we’re talking about, the border would be as soft as it is today, we could both be in Schengen and you wouldn’t have to queue to show your passport at Amsterdam, Paris or Berlin. What’s not to like?

  • Mach1965

    Yes, I do. A lot of the posts on slugger are opinions and analysis cloaked in whataboutry.
    I apologise reading back I let myself get drawn in. It was a reaction to why a blog that was about something completely different always being dragged towards SF, DUP and the usual tribal politics.
    As I said above if I’ve offended anyone I genuinely apologise.

  • eamoncorbett

    Would you think that running rings around your coalition partners is a recipe for good government especially when your partners can just collapse the whole thing. Remember that under the GFA direct rule can only be temporary, in effect that means that every effort has to be made to reinstate the assembly which can then be collapsed at any time . NI has an extremely difficult political problem which will never disappear while the present constitutional arrangements exist.
    You’re probably right there won’t be a United Ireland anytime soon , but if there is no compromise on the constitutional issue going forward then NI will reach political paralysis if indeed it’s not already there.

  • Mach1965

    I don’t know if plots are afoot but I do believe his “tenure ” is coming to an end. I read an interview he gave a few months ago, were he said he and MG had agreed to step aside. MG’s death scuppered that plan. However he also said he would be running in the next GE.
    So does that mean he only gives way to someone more palatable to the southern electorate I.e. Mary Lou.

  • The worm!

    Plainly we would have very differing views on the EU.

    However, that’s a completely different debate altogether.

    Like I said, I think the principle of some type of independence throws up many positive opportunities.

  • Kevin Breslin

    How did “unionism” in Ireland begin?
    Ireland was a seperate nation to the United Kingdom and then it joined the UK. Was Lord Castlereagh not a unionist?

    People could still maintain unionist politics even without the union.

  • Gavin Crowley

    Ireland 2016 where I live (Kilkenny) amounted to
    1. A reconstruction of a trench from the Somme and actors in British uniform on the streets.
    2. My primary school children prepared for an event where the proclamation was read and the flag raised by reading it and learning a bit about the signatories, studying a list of British army servicemen from the parish who served in WW1 and looking for their family links to them.
    3. Reprints of local newspaper articles from those times – including the King’s visit to Kilkenny on holidays.

    Overall it warmed up that vestigial British bit in me. The most lasting effect came from seeing that the descendants of the most notable Protestant family in the area, who provided the officer element of the WW1 list, are all still here, intermarried and intermingled with everyone else.

    The national coverage made me mourn for the Sherwood Foresters and the children who lost their lives in the Rising. Much of the rest passed me by.

    You wrote:
    “Reflect back on ‘Ireland 2016’. What narrative was being celebrated? Which was, at best, ignored?”
    What was being ignored?

  • Conor

    I don’t think there is any clear consensus and I would beg too differ with yours.
    https://www.google.ie/amp/s/amp.independent.ie/irish-news/1916/british-government-praises-ireland-for-inclusive-1916-centenary-celebration-34574864.html
    This is not the impression of the the government or the sos had.
    The Irish heritage minister with department responsible for this commemoration is ulster Presbyterian and of unionist OO heritage. The Irish government I believe was aiming to be sensitive too all sides and ensure those with backgrounds not supporting the side of independence in the commemoration definition. The Rte coverage highlighted in interviews from inside Gpo relatives of British soldiers killed in the rising. Families of these soldiers also highlighted their families pain throughout the decades since.

  • T.E.Lawrence

    When is Donald Trump paying compensation to all those Colonist Irish Americans to return home to mother Ireland ?

  • T.E.Lawrence

    Direct Rule was only a temporary measure back in 1972 and lasted 26 years ! Could Republiism sustain such a period again without descending into violent conflict ?

  • Toye native

    If there was a UI, you would need another plantation in ulster for unionists to get the numbers.
    You can have unionist politics, but you still won’t be a unionist without the union.
    That’s way you will never get a UI , only slim chance is if Ireland join with the UK.

  • mickfealty

    Not necessarily MU. That’s a counsel of despair which I don’t think either fits the problem or allows for an autonomous resolution (ie, within nationalism).

    The Dissenter has an excellent long form blog in which he quotes Clare O’Halloran on the unaddressed tensions within modern northern nationalism:

    ‘a united Ireland would end divisions in Ireland and between Ireland and Britain’ when the truth was that ‘such divisions centred on the very question of unity’.

    This is, I think, what Colum is slowly if a little awkwardly working towards addressing. The challenge is, in the words of Colum’s best leadership campaign line to ‘make Northern Ireland work’ whilst simultaneously making the benefits of cross border cooperation much more self evident to those much less bought in.

    Nationalism suffers none of the cringe that Unionism has been prey to over the peace process years, but then again Unionism has none of the glib hubris that Nationalism (of the northern type) acquired from it’s own ungrounded (and unwarranted) certainties of it’s own inevitability myth.

    That myth is the biggest liability to the prospect of a UI because it assures the CNR community that rapprochement is unnecessary for the acquisition of such, when in fact it is a prerequisite.

  • T.E.Lawrence

    https://www.unioinstvoice.com/2017/08/21/news-the-video-republicans-tried-to-hide/ The 2 tribes are further polarised as ever they where before – look at the next generation coming up.
    solution – here’s your house and here’s mine !

  • Kevin Breslin

    1. The Plantations did not cause the Union of Britain and Ireland, they happened centuries before Ireland joined the union.
    2. A united Ireland is of course possible if the political will is there, just like Ireland rejoing the U.K. or Scotland joining with England, or West Germany and East Germany etc.
    3. If there was a United Ireland don’t you think that people within it could still have the political aspiration that that nation rejoins a union with Britain?

  • Toye native

    Protestant unionists are descendants from the plantations.
    Unionists, NI and UK are one.
    Your 3rd point is a good point, that will only happen if the eu falls apart, and Dublin needs the UK for financial reason’s

  • Aodh Morrison

    It’s without doubt positive that your personal experience provided those you know of with a more rounded historical reflection. I would of course challenge the implicit message that the Easter Rising and WWI are in anyway comparable.

    However I was referring to the official events in Dublin. As the tanks and armoured cars rolled by, as the soldiers marched, where were the words to match the UK Head of State’s fine words on her visit to Ireland: “there are things that were done (by the British) that should have been done better, or not done at all.”?

    As the President of Ireland stood to honour an armed insurrection by a self-selecting micro-group without any democratic mandate whatsoever where was the nuance or measured tones lest other similar extant groups take comfort from those Presidential words?

    Where was the recognition that those Irish people in 1916 who freely choose a unionist political dispensation were of equal merit and are equally worthy of remembrance? What fine words did the Irish Head of State reserve for the unarmed Irish police officers murdered in the first minutes of Easter by the ‘gallant heroes’ of 1916?

    Of course it was not as jingoistic or triumphalist as it could have been (we have Sinn Féin for that stuff). As I said in my original post modern Ireland is a very different place than that imagined in the minds of the violent men and women who stormed the post office (!) in Dublin in 1916.

    Let’s not kid ourselves that official Ireland affords equal respect in remembrance of the two traditions on the island. Yet that’s ok, to the victor the spoils. Perhaps there will be more moves to encompass a wider narrative. I’m open to that possibility and will welcome them if they materilise.

  • Aodh Morrison

    Interesting that you felt the need to single out the religious antecedents of one government minister. Is that individual’s background germane to her official responsibilities?

    If, as you seem to suggest, the Heritage Minister was the Protestant/unionist voice did the religion (or none) of other members of the Government inform their approaches also in your opinion?

  • mickfealty

    I’d almost say it’s been prey to a deliberate subversion of its own messages. Republicanism, I’d suggest, needs to have a good old fashioned domestic over that.

  • Conor

    In response to yours original assertions
    “That shouty guy in uniform much featured in the media gave no time to extolling the virtues of the Irishmen who wore the uniform of the RIC did he?

    The Irish State is centered on a monocultural and single political cultural narrative. Unionists in the early 1900s, as they are now, are the national outlaws”; clearly my pointing to different cultures within the executive of the state is counter to this. It is not monoculture. The narrative surrounding this commemoration was clearly looking at wider British context and involvement of RIC and British regiments balanced with the revolutionary movement.
    I would expect any minister of any cultural background to maintain the balanced view to those of all sides of the revolution .
    However, if government functions for this were all devised by those of republican 1916 heritage this would be a travesty for ensuring transparency of a balanced narrative being portrayed.
    I would hope that the religion or cultural background of any politician would not influence policy but unfortunately this is what defines NI politics.

  • Aodh Morrison

    You’re suggesting that Ms Humphreys is a unionist? I’m sure I read somewhere that she has said in the past that she is “a proud Irish republican”.

    Does Fine Gael know?

    Can you point me in the direction of any public statement she has made disavowing Irish nationalism?

    Perhaps you’re making a sectarian point? As a Presbyterian (the only one in the Oireachtas I’m told) maybe you’ve appointed her by default as a unionist cultural spokesperson.

  • Conor

    There is no sectarian point, quite the opposite. We all have an inherited cultural heritage, this to some extent or another partly defines who we are. My heritage partly biases or influences my view of the world as does yours.
    100 years on from revolution those directly involved around 1916 are not party to what gets commemorated.
    if all those that influenced the commemoration were only descendants of Gpo volunteers that would be lamentable.
    Those that were in the somme at the time, those totally ambivalent, those in the RIC and those that signed the Ulster covenant should have their heritage acknowledged in a more accommodating Ireland. The easy option for Irish state government would have been to give oversight to the most outright republican dimension. This did not happen.
    As Gavin highlighted below also the wider British and pro Union dimension is what resonated in the commemoration.
    In a post conflict society I would hope to see all society happy at where it is but proud of its history and cultural norms and those norms respected and be respectable by the rest of society.

  • Roger

    UKNI is just a region; if they were harbored it was by the UK.

  • Roger

    You think some of them mightn’t?

  • Roger

    Ireland doesn’t allow cession of parts of its territory.
    UK does.
    The territory of the former UKNI would not be the same when part of IRL.

  • Kevin Breslin

    The Republic of Ireland exports zinc and Northern Ireland exports rock salt, they both literally sell part of their terrain.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    I agree with a lot of that but wouldn’t see the idea that nationalism requires a fundamental rethink as a counsel of despair, even for committed united Irelanders. Is it not unavoidable that the united Ireland project recasts itself as one of the creation of a brand new country, an experimental union of two peoples, rather than basing it on the debunked concept of a single “Irish people”?

  • MainlandUlsterman

    As Ben says, the UK is an amalgam to its core. It’s never really claimed to be one of the world’s more homogenous states.

    I’m not saying the island of Ireland can never turn itself into a British-style post-nationalist state in the future. Indeed that is the form of united Ireland most deserving of being taken seriously. I’m saying nationalism as it stands now needs to fundamentally change its worldview and attitude to those of British allegiance in NI to build a case for such an Ireland. Seems a long way off tbh.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    on heterogeneity Ireland has long talked the talk but it has not walked the walk – not towards P/U/L people anyway

  • MainlandUlsterman

    very well put, Aodh

  • MainlandUlsterman

    No I don’t think running rings around nationalist leaders is healthy. I’m saying that’s been a big problem with SF, they give unionists little or no incentive to reach out because they make it clear they are out to damage us not create a shared future. Same can be said of DUP. Neither party deserves government right now. If they grow up then maybe.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    I was asked what unionists would lose in a united Ireland. Answer: their country, the UK with NI in it.

    I wasn’t implying NI only belongs to unionists or anything of that sort. But they would be losing something, the same thing indeed, one’s country, that is why Irish nationalism exists. Nationalists I’m sure can empathise easily with that.

  • MainlandUlsterman

    Nationalism switched from SDLP to SF well before unionism switched from UUP to DUP …

  • MainlandUlsterman

    It’s still the UK, which includes a changing UK. We all change all the time.

  • mickfealty

    I’d agree with that. But those are some of the terms that Adams and Co use to make any arrangements they make provisional until the establishment of that new country. There has to be continuity with the past and willing confluence between north and South if it’s going to work.

    Willingness is critical, and this is where Graham’s ‘stalker’ image fits current nationalist behaviour for me.

    I thought that was one David’s stronger points in a good exchange with Graham, that counting the Catholics was exactly the wrong way to go. The myths (in the best narrative sense) are important, but they have to be recast more broadly in a functional way.

    This is exactly why I keep banging on about narrative and story, and back referencing Bryan Delaney’s warnings about the need for vigilance over the stories we chose to tell.

  • The worm!

    No, i don’t believe so.

  • Roger

    To sell something is not to cede territory…