Reeling in the years: Collapse of devolution throughout the years

The collapse of devolution has happened before in Northern Ireland and whilst we await the pending demise of the current Executive I thought it’d be interesting courtesy of AP to take a trip down memory lane to see other collapses in the past.

Direct rule introduced in March 1972. Here is the outgoing Prime Minister, Brian Faulkner protesting the British governments security policies.

Brian Faulkner following the UWC Strike in May 1974. The first power-sharing coalition between the Official Unionists, SDLP and Alliance parties is brought to an end as the UWC strike brings the province to a halt.

The pending collapse of the Trimble/Mallon Executive in 2002.

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  • Zig70

    We hug our little destiny again
    http://www.blueridgejournal.com/poems/sh-what.htm
    love the Trojan horse reference.

  • eireanne

    from the historic videos it was always unionist actions that led to suspension. maybe this time Mr Cameron will call their bluff and press on with his plan of talks about welfare reform, corporation tax and disbanding paramilitaries of all shades

  • Steve Larson

    It is and on the return Unionism is always weakened, always conceding ground and accepting reality.

    This will not change here.

  • Zeno

    Very good.

  • gendjinn

    There’s something very weird about how this is playing out. Is this kabuki with DUP/SF/UK on the inside of it, with the goal of getting the UK to implement policies such as ILA/welfare cuts/etc that the assembly can’t/won’t pass? Are the DUP/UUP being set up by the UK? Something else?

    This whole thing does not feel like any of the other brinkmanship crises we’ve been through, it just feels weird. Maybe time will tell.

  • SeaanUiNeill

    Some time back Am Ghobsmacht asked what actually was the long term strategy of Unionism. Seemingly simply standing on the defence with endless delaying actions until somehow the modern world along with Global cosmopolitanism makes old fashioned nationalism redundant. What they do not appear to take into account is that their world image becomes equally “historically situated” in this process of change.

  • barnshee

    ” Cameron will call their bluff and press on with his plan of talks about welfare reform, corporation tax and disbanding paramilitaries of all shades”

    That would ,ean adopting a very welcome unionist stance

  • barnshee

    “Is this kabuki with DUP/SF/UK on the inside of it, with the goal of getting the UK to implement policies such as ILA/welfare cuts/etc that the assembly can’t/won’t pass? ”

    You may very well be right -it was the big boys did it– we didn`t want to do it so we didn`t –it was them big boys

  • Steve Larson

    Old fashioned nationalism is dying in Britain. Britain is a busted flush with Scotland heading one way and the Tories becoming the party of ye old England.

    Even the Tories don’t seem to have much affection for the North.

    I think that they are on to a loser with that as geography trumps alot and nationalism changes it never disappears.

    Many proponents of the EU are as nationalist as I have ever seen and many of them write books slating nationalism.

  • SeaanUiNeill

    Inclined, Steve, to agree that cosmopolitanism is usually simply unconscious global-nationalism masquerading as universalist values.

    Oh, and have you read Gellner’s “Nations and Nationalism”, where in his definition, nationalism is identified as the centralising, modernising process that the EU is the most recent version of, something entirely at odds in its need to generalise with both genuine local identity and anything that could be realistically described as democratic?

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Nations-Nationalism-New-Perspectives-Past-ebook/dp/B001J54VPU/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

    As my anthropologist wife once said to me “Chauvinism knows no frontiers”…..

  • Steve Larson

    No but i will. TKS for the tip.